Bevin In Charge = $113 Million Shortfall

A federal appeals court has reinstated a claim for damages against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples during the summer of 2015. [John Cheves]

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is so terrible at leadership that Kentucky’s going under again. Kentucky’s budget director is predicting the state will suffer a $113 million revenue shortfall when the state’s fiscal year ends June 30. [C-J/AKN]

The burden of substance abuse disorders can fall heavily on the families and friends of those who battle addictions. But society also pays a great deal through increased crime. Treatment programs can reduce those costs. [NY Times]

Surprise! The fat, old, white racists of the Bowling Green Daily News are still panicking over President Barack Obama and are trying to suggest he’s still gonna take yer guns. It’s this special brand of stupid that keeps Kentucky in the dark ages. [BGDN]

Trump on Tuesday called for a “good shutdown” in September to fix the “mess” in government. [The Hill]

Mary Beth Burkes lives in Buchanan County, Va., a depressed coal-mining region where 1 in 4 families lives in poverty and where her autistic son gets extra help in the after-school program at his school. [WFPL]

A pro-Donald Trump biker gang’s physical handling of protesters at a weekend rally could add to the president’s legal woes, with one attendee considering a fresh lawsuit as protesters already suing over violence at rallies last year plan to cite the recent events as proof of an ongoing pattern. A federal judge late last month ruled that Trump’s calls of “get ’em out of here!” may have constituted “incitement to riot” at a March 2016 rally in Louisville, Kentucky, at which three protesters allege in a lawsuit they were assaulted by Trump supporters. [Politico]

The sequel to a successful spy film will focus heavily on bourbon distilling, and Louisville-based Brown-Forman Corp. is taking advantage of the exposure. [Business First]

A Texas police department has changed a key detail in the shooting of an unarmed black teenager, amid mounting calls for the officer to be arrested. [BBC]

The University of Kentucky announced on Monday afternoon that Commonwealth Stadium will become Kroger Field. [WKYT]

African-Americans are generally living longer than in 2000, but health disparities mean they are still more likely to die at a younger age on average than whites, a federal study showed on Tuesday. [Reuters]

A federal judge has ruled that Lexington cannot enforce a recently passed ordinance that restricts where advertising and other unsolicited printed materials can be delivered. [H-L]

Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to President Donald Trump who generated controversy for his alleged ties to a Nazi-aligned group, is expected to accept a new role soon outside of the White House, according to multiple reports. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Coal Will Never Be Kentucky’s Savior

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

The Courier-Journal/A Kentucky Newspaper has a long history of victim-shaming and character assassination. United didn’t have to pay for it – the C-J/AKN did it for free. The paper loves to shitsack murder victims, people of color, members of the LGBTQ community. And when you call their shitty reporters like Morgan Watkins out, they roll up with their bloated, lazy, heterosexual, white male staffers to yell at you in attempt to justify their nonsense. Not everyone there is terrible but they certainly do this shit with regularity. [Raw Story]

Letcher County officials are desperate for revenue to counter a crippling drop in coal severance tax collections, but deadlocked Monday evening on approving a business license fee on extractive operations such as oil and gas wells and coal mines. [H-L]

In 1996, Josie Slawik sat in the headquarters of the National Domestic Violence Hotline in Austin, Texas, and waited for the phone to ring. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Exorbitant drug prices, high deductibles and the need to jump through hoops to get procedures covered. Those were some of the realities of today’s health insurance landscape decried Saturday at a sidewalk town hall in downtown Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Doors are kicked in, belongings are tossed on the street or carted off to high-cost storage, and evicted families are forced to move into another squalid rental or worse. That may sound like an endpoint, but often it’s just a wrenching start, leading to a deeper morass of lost jobs, missed school, family breakups, hunger, depression. [Smithsonian]

The Richmond Planning and Zoning Commission is trying to chart a road map to the city’s future, and it’s asking residents for directions. [Richmond Register]

Trump’s missile strike on Syria has drawn favorable reviews from critics and only scattered criticism from Democrats. Yet unlike other Republican presidents who enjoyed a boost in the polls from their military actions, early signs suggest Trump may not be politically rewarded. [The Hill]

Morehead State University President Dr. Wayne Andrews was recognized for his 12 years of service to the university and community at Thursday’s Morehead-Rowan County Chamber of Commerce meeting. [The Morehead News]

It was one of the uglier scandals of the Bush administration: Top officials at an agency dedicated to protecting whistleblowers launched a campaign against their own employees based on suspected sexual orientation, according to an inspector general report. [ProPublica]

Sheila Minor with Barren River Refuge Inc., an organization working to establish a homeless shelter in Glasgow, spoke to members of the Cave City City Council on Monday about the need for the shelter. “People — I don’t know if they don’t want to believe or if they just don’t believe that Barren County has a homeless problem, but we do,” Minor said. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In the latest move by a major automaker to enhance its American manufacturing operations, Toyota said on Monday that it would invest more than $1.3 billion to upgrade its assembly plant in Kentucky. [NY Times]

Eight female inmates at the Boyd County Detention Center were rushed to the hospital Saturday night after they allegedly snorted heroin inside the jail and overdosed. [Ashland Independent]

Attorney General Jeff Sessions will end a Justice Department partnership with independent scientists to raise forensic science standards and has suspended an expanded review of FBI testimony across several techniques that have come under question, saying a new strategy will be set by an in-house team of law enforcement advisers. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin’s administration is looking for expert tax lawyers, apparently in anticipation of a possible special law-making session to overhaul Kentucky’s tax code later this year. [H-L]

Several times a week, a U.S. Air Force pilot takes off from the Royal Air Force base in Mildenhall, England, and heads for the northernmost edge of NATO territory to gather intelligence on Russia. One of these pilots is 40-year-old Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Webster, a veteran of many such expeditions and a hard guy to rattle. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Republicans Don’t Care About Poor Kids In Louisville… Or Anywhere In Kentucky

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Donald Trump brought Sen. Rand Paul to his Virginia golf course on Sunday to talk health policy with the outspoken critic of the failed plan to repeal and replace so-called Obamacare. [H-L]

It took far more than a year before presidents from Ronald Reagan through Barack Obama earned the disapproval of a majority of the public, according to Gallup. It took Trump just over a week. [HuffPo]

A federal judge in Louisville said in a ruling that then-candidate Donald Trump incited the use of violence against three protesters when he told supporters at a campaign rally a year ago to “get ’em out of here.” [C-J/AKN]

Texas Roadhouse Inc agreed to pay $12 million to settle U.S. claims that the steakhouse chain refused to hire people age 40 and over to work as hosts, servers and bartenders. A consent decree resolving the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s lawsuit against the Louisville, Kentucky-based chain was filed on Friday with the U.S. District Court in Boston. [Reuters]

Disconnection and poverty plague thousands of kids in Louisville. Some 160,000 Jefferson County children live in poverty and about 11,400 young people between the ages of 16 and 24 are out of work and not attending school, according to a new report released Wednesday. [WFPL]

It is no fantasy to say the drip-drip-drip of the Trump-Russia investigations is draining this presidency of political capital. The president’s historically high disapproval rating — 51 percent in the latest McClatchy poll — tells the same story. That’s why astute Republicans are starting to look out for themselves. [The Hill]

Madison County took the next step Friday toward fulfilling Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor’s dream for an innovative, comprehensive attack on the substance abuse epidemic. [Richmond Register]

During the first public Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about Russia’s meddling in the presidential election on Thursday, former FBI special agent Clint Watts explained how Russia and the Trump campaign team up to weaponize fake news. [ThinkProgress]

The $28 million construction project for the new Maysville Community and Technical College-Rowan Campus, located in the John Will Stacy MMRC Regional Business Park on KY 801, is on schedule, according to director Russ Ward. [The Morehead News]

The husband-and-wife team of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump, now both senior federal government officials, has been alongside Trump as the White House has hosted dozens of chief executives and a handful of world leaders in recent weeks. [NY Times]

Cortni Crews was named assistant superintendent of Barren County Schools at a press conference Friday afternoon at the BCS central office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At the Boys and Girls Club in this rural city in southern Oklahoma, the director is unsure how he will stay open if Trump’s proposed budget goes through, eliminating money for several staff positions. [WaPo]

The coordinating agency for Kentucky’s public colleges and universities is expected to set a 3 to 5 percent limit on tuition increases for the upcoming school year. [Linda Blackford]

This is what happens when you mix corruption with stupidity. Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt still doesn’t agree with the vast majority of climate scientists who say humans are the primary cause of climate change. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Monday Ought To Be Relatively Gross

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

A business owner and his two firms fined by the state for illegal dumping of radioactive waste have all filed for bankruptcy in federal court. [H-L]

Paul Ryan and the rest of the Republican Party either don’t understand how health care and health insurance work or they’re deliberately lying. Our money’s on lying. [HuffPo]

Mike Pence came to Kentucky and lied about the Affordable Care Act’s impact on the Commonwealth. Because that’s the New Republican way. [C-J/AKN]

Jared Kushner is keeping parts of his real estate empire. Given Kushner’s vast portfolio as an adviser to the president, it’s not clear how he’s going to avoid issues that could affect his bank account. The Trump administration has declined to give details. [ProPublica]

Kentucky is known for many things — horses, basketball, Ale-8-One, hot browns and, of course, moonshine. And for the Arvin family, moonshine has become more than a sweet beverage. [Richmond Register]

What was that, again, about Republicans not being atrociously racist? [The Hill]

Donald Trump’s resolve to shakeup the Environmental Protection Agency by slashing its budget and shrinking government regulations has states that rely heavily on EPA funding on edge. [Ashland Independent]

A group of states renewed their effort on Monday to block President Donald Trump’s revised temporary ban on refugees and travelers from several Muslim-majority countries, arguing that his executive order is the same as the first one that was halted by federal courts. [Reuters]

Attorney General Andy Beshear on Thursday called for a $142 million reduction in the Kentucky Utilities’ rate request that’s pending before the Public Service Commission. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A new analysis from the Congressional Budget Office also predicts $337 billion in deficit reduction over the same period. [WaPo]

Budget shortfalls at the University of Louisville are starting to have firsthand impacts on students. [Last] week student employees for the Brandeis School of Law were let go from their jobs. [WAVE3]

What a dark history. Rare, century-old photographs help illustrate the story of 272 slaves sold by Jesuit priests to secure the future of Georgetown University. [NY Times]

Hold on to your wigs. Donald Trump plans to hold a rally in Louisville’s Freedom Hall on Monday, March 20, the president’s website said. [H-L]

The Republican plan to repeal and “replace” the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of Americans without health coverage by 24 million and reduce the federal budget deficit by $337 billion by 2026, according to a Congressional Budget Office report published Monday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Cheeto Mussolini Really Stepped In It

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

A national science panel is about to dig into an issue fraught with controversy in Eastern Kentucky: Does living near surface coal mines increase the risk of health problems? [H-L]

Stephen Bannon, President Donald Trump’s chief strategist and the driving force behind the administration’s controversial ban on travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries, has a favorite metaphor he uses to describe the largest refugee crisis in human history. [HuffPo]

If you hadn’t noticed, Frankfort Republicans are trying to resegregate Louisville. Because of course they fucking are. [C-J/AKN]

The F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, asked the Justice Department this weekend to publicly reject President Trump’s assertion that President Barack Obama ordered the tapping of Mr. Trump’s phones, senior American officials said on Sunday. Mr. Comey has argued that the highly charged claim is false and must be corrected, they said, but the department has not released any such statement. Mr. Comey’s request is a remarkable rebuke of a sitting president, putting the nation’s top law enforcement official in the position of questioning Mr. Trump’s truthfulness. [NY Times]

When a Kentucky legislative committee approved a bill to let liquor store owners transport alcohol across county lines, Wesley Morgan was pleased by the time and money he would save as the owner of four Liquor World outlets in the state. The RPK has eschewed ethics for as long as the KDP. AKA forever. [Richmond Register]

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who during his confirmation hearings repeatedly vowed to promote human rights as a core American value, alarmed human rights advocates when he did not appear in person to present the State Department’s annual human rights report, released Friday. [WaPo]

The state House of Representatives passed measures Thursday to provide school districts extra money for transportation costs and to teach work skills and drug prevention as part of the public schools’ curriculum. [Ronnie Ellis]

Fewer than 24 hours after President Donald Trump condemned a recent wave of anti-Semitic attacks and spoke of allying with Muslim nations, a top White House aide returned to the administration’s unfounded claims that some of the anti-Semitic incidents may have been faked and declined to explicitly say whether the president believes Islam is a religion. [Vox]

While winter turning to spring is typically a great sight for farmers, many across Kentucky and the United States are worried about this year’s crops and who will be working the fields. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Before heading off to his so-called “winter White House” in Palm Beach, Florida, on Friday, WATB Donald Trump summoned some of his senior staff to the Oval Office and went “ballistic,” senior White House sources told ABC News. [ABC News]

Two House bills sponsored by state Rep. Danny Bentley, R-Russell, that aim to combat a statewide drug epidemic are headed for the Senate. [Ashland Independent]

The White House has been accused of withholding information from Congress about whether Donald Trump or any of his campaign affiliates have ever received loans from a bank in Cyprus that is partly owned by a close ally of Russian president Vladimir Putin. [The Guardian]

The 2017 General Assembly enters its final phase Monday as Republican leaders prepare for Gov. Matt Bevin a stack of legislation on university funding, religious expression, medical malpractice, workers’ compensation and many other subjects. [John Cheves]

President Harry Truman famously had a sign on his desk that read: “The buck stops here.” If Donald Trump’s brief history as commander in chief is any guide, he might want one that says: “Actually, it stops with the generals.” [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Turns Out It’s Possible: Matt Bevin Got Even More Embarrassing

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

The valley along Looney Creek in Harlan County was a wooded wilderness in 1917 when U.S. Steel, hungry for coal to make steel during World War I, bought 19,000 acres and set about creating the largest company-owned coal town in the world. [H-L]

OMG hold on to your wigs. Former President George W. Bush took President Donald Trump’s administration to task on Monday. [HuffPo]

Bratcher faced intense questioning and criticism from community members worried the bill is half-baked, stands to resegregate schools and constitutes government overreach. [C-J/AKN]

Matt Bevin isn’t just dumb – he’s as corrupt and backward as Donald Trump. He lies more than Trump, which is borderline astonishing. Errr… it would be. But this is a man with black children who pursues policies that disproportionally harm black people. [Faux Spews]

Just in case you missed Matt Bevin lying about how the Affordable Care Act has helped Kentucky. [WKYT]

It cost New York City about $24 million to provide security at Trump Tower, President Donald Trump’s skyscraper home in Manhattan, from Election Day to Inauguration Day, or $308,000 per day, New York’s police commissioner said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Restaurants open with the intent to serve, but two restaurants in Madison County have taken the idea of service to heart and have built their business models around offering everyone a place at their tables. [Richmond Register]

No going to church, no going to the store. No doctor’s appointments for some, no school for others. No driving, period — not when a broken taillight could deliver the driver to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. [NY Times]

Because all people experiencing depression and other issues show outward signs??? An inmate who hanged himself in the Greenup County Detention Center earlier this month had shown no signs of distress, jailer Mike Worthington said Friday. [Ashland Independent]

When your mind goes so far right-wing that you can’t discern humor. This is hilarious and terrifying. [WaPo]

Revising the health care law from the previous presidential administration was the primary issue U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie was interested in discussing during one of his stops in Glasgow on Wednesday, but he also touched on political topics ranging from Russia to Mexico. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Remember when Jack Conway said this sort of thing was fine and the Kentucky media turned a blind eye? An investigation by Fox 25 in Oklahoma has confirmed that Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt used a private email account to conduct official business while he was the state’s attorney general, directly contradicting what he told the Senate during his confirmation hearing. [ThinkProgress]

With the General Assembly controlled by business-friendly Republicans, electric utilities might have sensed an opportunity to ram through legislation to limit the growth of independent solar power in Kentucky. [H-L]

Jewish facilities around the nation were rocked by yet another wave of bomb threats Monday, forcing evacuations in at least 12 states. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

RPK Panics Over Bevin’s Insane Speech

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Bevin’s so scummy he can’t even figure out what’s going on with his lies. “The backlog is gone,” Bevin said. “And congratulations to all those who helped to make sure that that happened.” However, the backlog is nowhere near gone. [John Cheves]

In a major setback for the Trump administration, a federal appeals court on Thursday declined its urgent request to restore the controversial executive order restricting refugees and travel by immigrants from a number of Muslim-majority countries. [HuffPo]

Casey Lozier has lived on nearly every street in Pleasant Ridge. He climbed trees in his front yard on Fairfield Avenue. Settled down with his young bride on Halcyon. And celebrated Christmas Eve at his late mother’s house on Butler. [C-J/AKN]

He’s too stupid to comprehend how the three branches of government work. Trump lashed out at an appeals court decision on Thursday rejecting his administration’s case to reinstate his travel ban, calling the ruling “a political decision.” [The Hill]

Calling his bill “a work in progress,” Senate President Robert Stivers, R-Manchester, told the Senate Local and State Government Committee on Wednesday it will set up a process to protect universities from the sort of dysfunction suffered by the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump’s “wall” along the U.S.-Mexico border would be a series of fences and walls that would cost as much as $21.6 billion, and take more than three years to construct, based on a U.S. Department of Homeland Security internal report seen by Reuters on Thursday. [Reuters]

The Republican Party of Kentucky wishes it could gut Louisville but it’s going to fail every time it tries. Democratic leaders on the Louisville Metro Council are criticizing an effort from state lawmakers to reconfigure the power structure of the city’s government gives too much control to those outside the city. [WFPL]

Yes, Democrats can be as stubborn as Mitch McConnell. If Chuck Schumer and his Senate Democrats choose a path of obstructing President Trump’s agenda, they will have learned from the best. [ProPublica]

Perhaps trying to digest news from Gov. Matt Bevin’s Wednesday evening State of the Commonwealth speech calling for more tax revenue, it was a relatively slow day for state lawmakers Thursday. [More Ronnie Ellis]

Trump loves to set the day’s narrative at dawn, but the deeper story of his White House is best told at night. [NY Times]

The Edmonton City Council has amended its alcohol ordinance so the expiration dates of local and state alcohol licenses correspond. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Trump made a whopper of a claim on Monday, suggesting that the media is deliberately ignoring terrorist attacks. The kernel of the idea appears to have come from — or at least been propagated by — one of his favorite news sources: the conspiracy theory website InfoWars. [WaPo]

Jeff Hoover said many of the 64 Republicans in the Kentucky House of Representatives have little interest in raising taxes. “I think it would be problematic for a lot of our members at this point,” said Hoover, R-Jamestown. “But we have a tremendous financial problem facing this state in the form of funding our pension systems … it’s something that obviously we’re going to look at when he gets the proposal to us and it’s a tough issue.” [H-L]

In his first call as president with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump denounced a treaty that caps U.S. and Russian deployment of nuclear warheads as a bad deal for the United States, according to two U.S. officials and one former U.S. official with knowledge of the call. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]