The Frankfort Gagfest Begins Today

Basically, Kentucky’s economy is and always will be a dumpster fire in some awful Covington back alley. [H-L]

A clip of Donald Trump is featured in a purported new recruitment video released by Al-Shabaab, the terrorist group based in Somalia. [HuffPo]

Frankfort is looking at tougher penalties to fight the appearance of flakka. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama defended his plan to take executive action on guns on Monday, saying the proposals are within his legal authority and consistent with the Constitution. [The Hill]

Under President Dwight D. Eisehower, the nation prepared for the 50th birthday of the National Park Service with a spending splurge that refurbished Independence Hall in Philadelphia and helped complete the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and the 469-mile Blue Ridge Parkway. [Richmond Register]

Inside the backward ideology driving the right-wing terrorists who captured an empty federal building. [ThinkProgress]

Heh – the Bowling Green Daily News is ready to go back to the 1950s. You know, simpler times when segregation was more accepted and women weren’t permitted to work. [BGDN]

U.S. authorities took 121 people into custody over the weekend, primarily in Texas, Georgia and North Carolina, as immigration authorities moved to deport families who entered the United States illegally after May 2014, officials said on Monday. [Reuters]

When Glasgow Police Department Chief Guy Howie made his roughly 15-minute presentation at Monday’s city council meeting, it was the second time the council had heard it, with the first time being in a closed session immediately beforehand that lasted nearly 90 minutes.[Glasgow Daily Times]

Ben Carson said on Monday that he is open to reconsidering recent moves to lift a ban on gays and lesbians in the military and to allow women to serve in combat, while his new campaign manager said the idea of women serving in combat roles is dubious. [Politico]

Thousands of recommendations that could save taxpayers tens of billions of dollars are gathering dust, the watchdog arm of the federal government says. [Ashland Independent]

President Barack Obama says the tighter gun laws he will announce this week will “save lives” and potentially spare families the agony of bereavement. [BBC]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

According to a comprehensive report from The Washington Post, nearly 1,000 Americans were shot and killed by police in 2015. That startling number aside, another surprising finding from the data is just how little the FBI truly understood the breadth of police shootings in previous years. [HuffPo]

John Yarmuth Stands Against Xenophobia

There’s at least one person from Kentucky in Washington who isn’t a first-rate bigot:

“As we saw in Paris, the threat of terrorist attacks and radicalization of European nationals is a global security threat. We must continue to work with our allies to combat ISIS and other jihadists who seek to harm and kill innocent civilians. Here at home, the federal government needs to ensure that everyone entering the United States poses no threat to the American people.

“Today, I opposed a misguided bill that uses bureaucratic delays to shut down our Syrian and Iraqi refugee programs, while failing to provide any security improvements to our vetting process. I supported an alternative proposal that improves our vetting process for refugees from all countries with active terrorist networks, not just Syria and Iraq, increases Congressional oversight of these programs, and continues to help families fleeing horrific violence.

“We all saw the heartbreaking and tragic photo of a dead three-year old Syrian boy who had washed ashore in Turkey this past September. His mother and sister also died as they desperately tried to find safety in Greece. More than 70 children have drowned since that photo was taken. The war in Syria has killed at least 250,000 people, including more than 12,000 children. This is a humanitarian crisis.

“As we work to strengthen our security, our answer cannot be to abandon the innocent victims of the same terror we strive to defeat. Our nation was founded with the idea that life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are inalienable rights, endowed, not by Congress, but by our creator. We became the wealthiest, most powerful nation the world has ever known as we welcomed the tired, hungry, and poor. These are the values that made us great, and in the face of terror, we cannot turn from them. We must hold them close or risk losing them forever. I’m proud to represent a city that has embraced those ideals, a city that celebrates its rich history of welcoming refugees from around the world. Today, I stand with the people of Louisville in refusing to turn my back on those in need.”

Unfortunately, the rest of the bunch — literally every member of the house and senate from Kentucky — are losing their minds over brown people who are being slaughtered.

Yet you wonder why Kentucky can’t have nice things.

That KSP Situation Is Absolutely Fascinating

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray’s inauguration fund has paid a $510 fine for filing financial records 46 days late. [H-L]

President Barack Obama apologized to Doctors Without Borders on Wednesday for the American air attack that killed at least 22 people at its hospital in Afghanistan, and said the U.S. would examine military procedures to look for better ways to prevent such incidents. [HuffPo]

A lawsuit filed by a woman exonerated of a murder after serving eight years behind bars offers new details about how she alleges an overzealous Kentucky State Police detective framed her. [C-J/AKN]

Top House Democrats are accusing the chairman of the House Oversight Committee of refusing to share the unedited footage from the recent undercover videos targeting Planned Parenthood. [The Hill]

U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Louisville, is predicting low voter turnout for March’s Republican presidential caucus next year. Yarmuth expects turnout will be “pretty pathetic” because voters in the state have no history with caucuses. [WFPL]

U.S. stocks ended stronger after a volatile session on Wednesday, led by a rebound in biotechnology companies that pushed the S&P 500 to its highest level in three weeks. [Reuters]

An attorney for former Glasgow Fire Department Sgt. Roger Hampton has filed documents with the Kentucky Court of Appeals that attempt to get the case regarding his firing dismissed. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A new study published last month in Sociological Forum has found two important connections that demonstrate how discrimination has a negative impact on the health and well-being of transgender people. [ThinkProgress]

Casey County Clerk Casey Davis says his office is now issuing marriage licenses. [WKYT]

Verizon is merging its cellphone tracking supercookie with AOL’s ad tracking network to match users’ online habits with their offline details. [ProPublica]

When best-selling author Neil Gaiman was asked to give advice to aspiring authors at Western Kentucky University’s latest installment of the 2015-16 Cultural Enhancement Series on Tuesday night, his first piece of advice was only one word. [BGDN]

After years of drug addiction, Jayne Fuentes feels she’s close to getting her life back on track, as long as she doesn’t get arrested again — but not for using drugs. She fears it will be because she still owes court fines and fees, including hundreds of dollars for her public defender. [NPR]

With platoons of Republicans running for president, the Democratic National Committee has had too much on its plate to spend much time commenting on Kentucky’s gubernatorial race. [H-L]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]