Can You Believe Flipping Stan Chesley?

When the candidates for lieutenant governor meet to debate at Midway University Thursday, Heather Curtis will not be among them. [H-L]

On December 14, 2006, Stephen Sheller filed his first case against Johnson & Johnson. The client was a New Jersey boy who had taken Risperdal beginning in 2001. When he had met the boy and his mother, Sheller thought the case would be about diabetes and weight gain. But then she and her son became traumatized by his growing breasts, and in August 2004, he had radical surgery to remove them. [HuffPo]

Former superstar lawyer Stan Chesley, who was disbarred for bilking former clients in Kentucky’s notorious fen-phen scandal, has sued five of them — and their lawyer — to try to avoid paying a $42 million judgment they won against him. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton came out Tuesday against the Keystone XL oil pipeline, making the highly anticipated announcement after years of pressure from environmentalists opposed to the politically fraught project. [The Hill]

Eastern Kentucky University ranks second among Kentucky’s six regional universities in the most recent rankings from College Factual, a web site (it’s “website” but these people are still in the dark ages) that uses outcomes- and value-based data to guide students through the college selection process. [Richmond Register]

U.S. stocks dropped on Tuesday as a selloff in commodities dragged down materials shares and Volkswagen suppliers’ shares dropped following the German carmaker’s emissions scandal. [Reuters]

She’s already spent five days in jail, and now a Kentucky clerk could be back in court soon for altering marriage license forms issued to same-sex couples. [Ashland Independent]

Many Catholic colleges leave low-income students with big debts. And wealthy Catholic schools that provide generous support don’t enroll many poor students. [ProPublica]

Martha Blakley and her husband, Arnold, volunteered on Saturday with the Barren County Community Emergency Response Team to help with the Trashmaster’s Classic — the annual lakeshore cleanup on Barren River Lake. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Four couples have asked a US judge to order Kentucky clerk Kim Davis to reissue their marriage licences after she altered them to remove her name. Ms Davis, an elected official, opposes gay marriage and has said that her Christian faith should exempt her from signing those licences. [BBC]

A family is raising questions after a newly released autopsy in a deadly police shooting. Joshua Blough was shot three times, including once in the back, by two Elizabethtown officers. [WLKY]

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Tuesday the greater sage grouse does not need protections under the Endangered Species Act. [NPR]

Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R-Alien) was all smiles Tuesday morning as he walked up Broadway in downtown Lexington, warmly greeting the throng of Kentucky reporters waiting for him. [H-L]

The amount of money the world has pledged to divest from fossil fuels now exceeds $2.6 trillion, a group of policymakers, philanthropists and activists announced Tuesday. The figure is 50 times higher than the $52 billion that had been divested exactly one year ago. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Circus: Act 2 Begins Now

The city of Somerset agreed to drop its lawsuit challenging the authority of the state auditor’s office to do special examinations of cities, officials announced Friday. Auditor Adam Edelen’s office will bill Somerset $50,000 to cover the costs of doing the exam that led to the lawsuit, said Edelen’s assistant auditor, Libby Carlin. [H-L]

An extraordinary meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered Down Under. The prehistoric beast was certainly no match for T. rex, but with its huge hook-like claws it must have been pretty ferocious. [HuffPo]

Five months ago, Matt Bevin was almost an afterthought in the Republican primary. Today, the Louisville businessman is still something of a mystery – but he’s more likely than not to be the next governor of Kentucky, and he even says so! [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you didn’t already know that Mike Huckabee is crazier than a shithouse rat. Mike Huckabee on Thursday said the Dred Scott decision denying U.S. citizenship to African-Americans is the law of the land. [The Hill]

Of course Tom Riner connected backward-ass hater Kim Davis with the Liberty Con Artists. Leave it to Riner to be worried about Davis losing everything and not about the LGBT folks across the Commonwealth who face job loss and homelessness as a result of their sexual orientation. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republican anti-gay bigotry threatens the First Amendment. We’re looking at all of you Republicans who are afraid to stand up to your colleagues. This past June, in the heat of their outrage over gay rights, congressional Republicans revived a nasty bit of business they call the First Amendment Defense Act. It would do many things, but one thing it would not do is defend the First Amendment. To the contrary, it would deliberately warp the bedrock principle of religious freedom under the Constitution. [NY Times]

Few new superintendents have started the job with as many major projects and problems as Michael D. Taylor, who came to the Fairview independent district this summer in the wake of two state investigations. [Ashland Independent]

Mitch McConnell said in an interview Friday he will back a plan to fund the government into December with no conditions, rejecting in his strongest terms yet calls from within his party to defund Planned Parenthood as part of a larger budget bill. [Politico]

Some Louisville workers haven’t seen their pay grow fast enough to keep up with the national inflation rate during the last five years, an analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show. [Business First]

Shell Oil Co.’s president Marvin Odum made the trip on Sept. 2 from Houston to this northern-most town in the United States, a spot whose traditional name, Ukpeagvik, means “place where snowy owls are hunted.” [WaPo]

The attorney representing a former Glasgow Police Department chief, Guy J. Turcotte, in his civil lawsuit against the City of Glasgow and interim GPD Chief James Duff argued Friday in Barren Circuit Court that excessive media coverage made it impossible for his client to receive a fair trial in the county. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. prosecutors sought to drop wire fraud charges on Friday against a physicist at Temple University in Philadelphia, nearly four months after he was accused of sharing proprietary U.S. technology with China. [Reuters]

Here’s your NO SHIT, SHERLOCK moment regarding schools rating themselves too high in program reviews. [H-L]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

Rough Week For A Former Fletcher Guy

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

Federal regulators have proposed that equipment used to haul coal in underground mines be required to have technology designed to prevent miners from being run over or crushed. [H-L]

Warren Buffett doesn’t think any Americans should be poor anymore. In an economy that produces over $54,000 in gross domestic product per capita, the billionaire says, regulators must rein in the fast-widening gap between the poor and the super-rich. [HuffPo]

The Securities and Exchange Commission has accused former Kentucky Lt. Gov. Steve Pence of fraud. The civil charge against Pence, who also is a former U.S. attorney, accuses him of making misleading statements to auditors when he was the majority shareholder and chairman of a staffing services company called General Employment Enterprises. [C-J/AKN]


WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two arrests in an animal cruelty investigation in Florida has ties to a similar case in Kentucky and other states. One of the two womens’ many aliases will sound familiar. [WLEX18]

The bipartisan leadership of the House Energy and Commerce Committee is asking the Food and Drug Administration how it monitors the safety of the popular blood thinner Coumadin, particularly in light of deaths and hospitalizations of nursing home residents taking the drug. [ProPublica]

Louisville Metro police are conducting a death investigation after a 50-year-old woman was found dead in West Louisville, but neighbors said they don’t believe her death was an accident. [WAVE3]

More than 90 percent of Americans support expanding background checks on gun purchases. Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is one of those supporters — but only when it comes to his own state. [ThinkProgress]

A Warren County couple will soon open the doors of Drake Country Store for their fourth stint as owners. [BGDN]

In July, the BBC published a video showing that not only are US workers not guaranteed vacation time by law, but that 40% choose not to take all of the days to which they are entitled. [BBC]

A report from the Kentucky State Police released late last month revealed that in 2014 there were 127,326 reported vehicle collisions within the state. That figure is a 3.3 percent increase from the number that was reported in 2013. [Times-Tribune]

After faring poorly in recent polls amid a crowded GOP presidential field, Jeb Bush has begun aggressively courting former US diplomats, who he hopes will make public endorsements for him and encourage wealthy American expats to donate to his campaign. [Mother Jones]

Predictions on how long it takes Salato to let the bobcat and bald eagle die? [H-L]

Jeb Bush is copying Donald Trump — and Hillary Clinton, and President Barack Obama. [HuffPo]

The Kim Davis Media Circus Continues

Shouts of joy erupted outside the Rowan County Courthouse Friday morning as William Smith and James Yates obtained a marriage license in Rowan County Friday morning from deputy county clerk Brian Mason. [H-L]

U.S. job growth rose less than expected in August, which could dim prospects of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike later this month, even as the unemployment rate dropped to a near 7-1/2- year low of 5.1 percent and wages accelerated. [HuffPo]

The city is asking residents to help Louisville’s homeless veterans take better care of their feet as more former military service members living on the street come forward. [C-J/AKN]

Many in the West are backing an effort to keep the greater sage grouse off the endangered species list. By saving the bird, they feel they can save the culture and customs of the West as well. [NPR]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

Murder rates have increased sharply across the US in 2015, with at least 30 cities reporting a rise in violence. [BBC]

Residents offered their two-minute takes in Lexington Thursday on a thousand-page federal coal mining regulation that’s been years in the making. [WFPL]

It was a show of respect to Native Americans when President Obama on Sunday restored the name of the nation’s tallest mountain, formerly called Mount McKinley, to Denali. So it makes a lot of sense that presidential candidate Donald Trump didn’t like it. [ThinkProgress]

Rowan County residents James Yates and William Smith Jr. were the first same-sex couple to obtain a marriage license in their home county. It was also the first license issued in the office since a controversial U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June. [Ashland Independent]

Holding hands, James Yates and William Smith Jr. entered the media-filled courthouse shortly after 8, and began the process of applying for a marriage license for at least the sixth time. By 8:15, the couple had obtained their license. [Jim Higdon for the WaPo]

James Yates and Will Smith Jr. walked out of the Rowan County Courthouse this morning at 8:30 a.m. with their marriage license. [The Morehead News]

The US military has reopened a criminal investigation into some of the most serious accusations of war crimes against US forces in Afghanistan since 2001. [The Nation]

Fascinating how quickly the powerful few give up on talks of holding the University of Louisville Foundation accountable. [H-L]

The GOP presidential candidates love to warn voters of the threat of Islamic terrorists. Not a day goes by without Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) bemoaning the threat of “radical Islamic terrorism.” But amid all of the fear-mongering about terrorists, it might be wise for presidential candidates to be able to identify the names of actual terrorists, like the head of the Islamic State, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, and the head of al Qaeda, Ayman al Zawahiri. [HuffPo]

A Fun Terry Holliday Fluff Piece For Ya

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Burst pipes. Backed-up toilets. Cranky elevators. Those are the typical types of calls property managers receive on weekends. [H-L]

More than 15 years have passed since this small a share of Americans didn’t get medical care they needed because of the cost, a new federal government report reveals. [HuffPo]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

In late July, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a 2016 federal agency funding bill that came with instructions to the Internal Revenue Service to vastly expand the paperwork for the Earned Income Tax Credit. [Mother Jones]

This fluff from KET about Terry Holliday will make your eyes bleed. What the living eff? That entire thing is a case study in intellectual dishonesty. [KET]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

A new report from Citibank found that acting on climate change by investing in low-carbon energy would save the world $1.8 trillion through 2040, as compared to a business-as-usual scenario. In addition, not acting will cost an additional $44 trillion by 2060 from the “negative effects” of climate change. [Think Progress]

At 4.7 percent, Madison was among the 11 Kentucky counties will the lowest jobless rates in July. [Richmond Register]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday threw out a judge’s ruling that would have blocked the National Security Agency from collecting phone metadata under a controversial program that has raised privacy concerns. [Reuters]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made his first stop in Hazard since taking that position. [WYMT]

Legal watchdogs are calling on the Supreme Court to weigh in on whether it is constitutional for police to have access to telephone records without first obtaining a search warrant. [The Hill]

Watch a group of scared white people couch their fear of the gays in religion. [H-L]

This is the biggest duh ever. DUH. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Is Still The Absolute Dumbest

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

College students this past fall likely borrowed the least amount for higher education in five years, federal data show, amid declining overall enrollment and a drop in lending to students at for-profit schools. [HuffPo]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s break with President Obama on Arctic drilling this week represented a public shift left for the Democrat, a move greens say could be the start of a push to shore up support among environmentalists ahead of primary season. [The Hill]

Maintaining a healthy heart or testing for those who are suffering from heart-related illness became a lot closer and simpler for Richmond residents Tuesday after the opening of KentuckyOne Health’s Heart and Vascular Imaging Clinic. [Richmond Register]

“The Wire” creator and former Baltimore Sun reporter talks about a historic public housing fight, race and what makes white people go “batshit, batshit crazy.” [ProPublica]

A “Stand Fast Kim” banner attached to a plane rippled across the sky above thousands of roaring religious freedom advocates at the state Capitol. [Ashland Independent]

Every year, 40 percent of the food grown in the United States ends up in the garbage. A lot of that waste happens at the consumer level — according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), about 25 percent of the food that Americans buy is thrown away. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky Senator and Republican Presidential Candidate Rand Paul visited Corbin Friday where he had a chance to meet with local citizens. [Times-Tribune]

Donald Trump on Saturday sought to give Jeb Bush a black eye over a black hand. Trump wailed on the former Florida governor for a Photoshopped picture in a campaign leaflet sent out by a pro-Bush super PAC that shows him with a black left hand, and his body apparently super-imposed on a picture of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. [Politico]

As required by state law, the Rowan County Board of Education has scheduled a public hearing in the board’s meeting room on Wednesday, Sept. 2, at 6 p.m. [The Morehead News]

The US government is launching a $5m (£3.2m) initiative to combat the use and trafficking of heroin, with a focus on prioritising treatment rather than punishment. [BBC]

But they can still access every other horrible site on earth. A website that helps married people have affairs is now off limits to Kentucky state employees on their state-issued computers and phones. [H-L]

If you are running for office as a Republican today, you have to mention your reverence for the Constitution at least as much as you mention your love for Ronald Reagan. But Republican politicians have a few glaring blind spots when it comes to the Constitution. One of those is the 14th Amendment, a pillar of our inclusive democracy, a key component of which Republican presidential candidates are now asking us to ignore or change. [HuffPo]