Another Day, Another Frankfort FBI Investigation Because Kentucky = Corruption

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

The FBI is conducting an anti-trust investigation into state contractors involving road work. [H-L]

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) began an all-night protest on the Senate floor late Tuesday, promising to speak “as long as I’m able” in protest of the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. [HuffPo]

They carried black coat-hangers and signs that said things like “Think outside my box.” And they chanted slogans like “Mister, mister, hands off my sister” and “My body, my choice.” [C-J/AKN]

It was no secret during the campaign that Donald Trump was a narcissist and a demagogue who used fear and dishonesty to appeal to the worst in American voters. The Times called him unprepared and unsuited for the job he was seeking, and said his election would be a “catastrophe.” Still, nothing prepared us for the magnitude of this train wreck. [LA Times]

A summit on addiction held last winter at the University of Louisville has produced a slew of recommendations for overcoming the heroin and opioid epidemic in Kentucky. [WFPL]

A couple of weeks ago, for the first time ever, I represented an undocumented worker in deportation proceedings. Or rather, I tried to. My attempts to navigate this system were not what I would call successful. Part of this may be due to the fact that, though I have been a practicing attorney for 10 years, this was my first go at immigration law. But another part of it—most of it, I’d venture—is due to the fact that the U.S. immigration system is designed to be opaque, confusing, and inequitable. [Dan Canon in Slate]

Madison Circuit Judge William G. Clouse on Monday ordered a year’s delay in the trial of Raleigh Sizemore and Gregory Ratliff in the murder of Richmond Police Officer Daniel Ellis. [Richmond Register]

For years, Tammy and Joseph Pavlic tried to ignore the cracked ceiling in their living room, the growing hole next to their shower and the deteriorating roof they feared might one day give out. Mr. Pavlic worked for decades installing and repairing air-conditioning and heating units, but three years ago, with multiple sclerosis advancing, he had to leave his job. [NY Times]

Even in a state with a long history of tobacco culture and a high percentage of smokers, public support for a statewide smoking ban is growing. [Ronnie Ellis]

Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, is currently in Iraq as a White House envoy in a further expansion of his role as shadow diplomat. [WaPo]

The two families who actually showed up Monday morning to protest in front of the Barren County Courthouse had their own sets of circumstances to work through with the state agency that investigates child abuse allegations, but their stories had one thing in common: They don’t like the way the job has been done. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The United Arab Emirates arranged a secret meeting in January between Blackwater founder Erik Prince and a Russian close to President Vladi­mir Putin as part of an apparent effort to establish a back-channel line of communication between Moscow and President-elect Donald Trump, according to U.S., European and Arab officials. Prince’s sister Betsy DeVos serves as education secretary in the Trump administration. [More WaPo]

The Kentucky State University Foundation has paid nearly $85,000 to a Washington, D.C. public relations firm that reports only to the Kentucky State University Board of Regents, working independently of the president and the school’s public relations staff. [H-L]

Ten weeks after the Trump administration unceremoniously pushed out several top-level State Department officials, their positions remain unfilled, and more than half of the positions listed on the agency’s leadership chart are vacant or occupied by temporary acting officials. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

Why On Earth Is Rand Paul So Nervous?

Rand Paul spent four years in the U.S. Senate accumulating millions of dollars to support his re-election campaign, but when it came time to actually run, much of the money was gone. [H-L]

Kurdish fighters said they had taken the town of Bashiqa near Mosul from Islamic State on Sunday as coalition forces pressed their offensive against the jihadists’ last stronghold in Iraq. [HuffPo]

Go looking for Donald Trump’s Kentucky, and you might find yourself on Terry Wright’s front porch. [C-J/AKN]

Joel Benenson, a campaign strategist for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, said early Sunday that the Republicans are promoting a conservative activist’s videos out of desperation as the presidential election draws closer. [The Hill]

The state Energy and Environment Cabinet announced Friday that it has reached an agreement in principle with Advanced Disposal Services Blue Ridge Landfill Inc. on penalties and remediation for the illegally dumping of low-level radioactive fracking wastes at the Blue Ridge landfill in Estill County. [Richmond Register]

Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton maintained her commanding lead in the race to win the Electoral College and claim the U.S. presidency, according to the latest Reuters/Ipsos States of the Nation project results released on Saturday. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin paid Raceland-Worthington High School a surprise visit on Thursday. [Ashland Independent]

For decades, it’s been widely understood that religious conservatives are a force to be reckoned with in American politics. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky State Police is investigating an officers-involved shooting that left an Edmonton man dead just before 1 a.m. today, according to a KSP press release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

North Korea has conducted an unsuccessful test launch of an intermediate ballistic missile, the US military says. [BBC]

Rowan County Fiscal Court has amended its animal control policy after recommendations from a feline foster group. [The Morehead News]

Even by the blustery standards of this notoriously squall-swept land, Aug. 7 was a particularly gusty day. [WaPo]

Watching the live stream Thursday as the University of Louisville reacted to the NCAA notice of allegations that alleges U of L committed four level-one rules infractions relating to the school’s “escorts in the basketball dorm” scandal, one thing struck me as funny. [H-L]

Republicans who back Donald Trump and are now expressing shock and consternation at his trashing of the democratic process shouldn’t be surprised. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Anyone Remember The Iraq Quagmire?

A federal grand jury has indicted two men who are accused of distributing elephant tranquilizer that resulted a string of overdoses in Rowan County. [H-L]

When Sarbast Salih and his men enter a house formerly held by ISIS, they don’t go through the front door. Instead, they shimmy in through a window. [HuffPo]

When Pierce Mumaw’s students ask who he’ll vote for in the upcoming presidential election, he’s unapologetically honest about his conservatism. [C-J/AKN]

Haha, they think he’s from Ohio. Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Ohio) on Saturday dismissed Donald Trump’s repeated claims that the November election will be rigged. [The Hill]

If you think this isn’t a Larry Clark-Damon Thayer good old boy political situation, you’re part of the problem. What this story doesn’t mention is that Thayer is advised by RPK’s spokesperson, who advocates for the repeal of label taxes and all that. Fun how that’s all overlooked. Thayer wanted it in the bill. [WFPL]

The U.S. economy is on track to grow at a 1.9 percent annualized pace in the third quarter following the September data on domestic retail data, the Atlanta Federal Reserve’s GDP Now forecast model showed on Friday. [Reuters]

The removal of sludge from the city of Ashland’s water reservoir, a process that hasn’t taken place in eight years, is set to begin. [Ashland Independent]

It took Nick Alati half a day to cast a ballot in Arizona’s August primary — and his vote didn’t even count. [ProPublica]

Local historical figures will come to life Nov. 4-5 in South Central Kentucky Cultural Center’s Harvest of History, a living history event that doubles as a fundraiser for the cultural center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump appeared to question the legitimacy of Barack Obama’s presidency on Saturday, referring to him at a rally as the “quote ‘president.’’’ [Politico]

Sharon Sandifer-Bethea of Morehead is happy but anxious about the latest step in efforts to have her criminal record expunged. [The Morehead News]

Their public conference had been interrupted by a demonstration march and a bomb threat, so the white nationalists decided to meet secretly instead. They slipped past police officers and protesters into a hotel in downtown Memphis. The country had elected its first black president just a few days earlier, and now in November 2008, dozens of the world’s most prominent racists wanted to strategize for the years ahead. [WaPo]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is in a pickle. The senior Kentucky Republican began the year with a tough Senate electoral map. A wildly unpredictable Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, has possibly made that map even harder. [H-L]

Following the news of yet another “warmest month ever,” NASA has basically called it: This year will be the hottest since record-keeping began in 1880. [HuffPo]

You’re Probably A Trump Deplorable…

The University of Kentucky wants to stop using state procurement rules in hiring investment managers for its $1.2 billion endowment, a move that officials say will allow it to be more nimble and make more money. [H-L]

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said Tuesday that his office has launched an ongoing “inquiry” into whether the nonprofit Donald J. Trump Foundation is “complying with the laws governing charities in New York.” [HuffPo]

Since she was installed as president of Spalding University in 2010, Tori Murden McClure has not accepted a raise or a bonus. She turned down a car allowance and she turned down a housing allowance. Her only perk as president is a campus parking space. [C-J/AKN]

Disability rights groups said on Thursday they have asked child protective services to intervene in the case of a severely disabled Wisconsin teenager who suffers chronic pain from her disease and wants to die. [Reuters]

With unemployment rates for Barren County still hovering around the 5 percent mark, local industries are having a harder time filling their need for skilled workers. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A Dubai real estate mogul had a prison sentence disappear. Manufacturing executives in El Salvador dodged having to clean up a case of dangerous lead contamination. Two global financiers embezzled $300 million from an Indonesian bank but got off light. [ProPublica]

The regional heroin epidemic seemingly has hit Rowan County with six suspected heroin overdoses reported Thursday in a 12-hour period. [The Morehead News]

Coal and electricity companies paid to meet with Republican state attorneys general just weeks before those top law enforcement officials joined in suing the federal government over the EPA’s Clean Power Plan, new documents show. [ThinkProgress]

Dogs will soon scamper in Ashland’s Central Park inside a fence that once wrapped around a seldom-used ice skating rink. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump has maintained he was always against the US invasion of Iraq, but he is on record as saying otherwise. [BBC]

As Eastern Kentucky University students shuffle from class to class this semester, they are surrounded by a cacophony of bulldozers, hammers and intermittent beeps as the campus undergoes an ambitious revitalization not seen since the Robert R. Martin era. [Richmond Register]

If you’ve ever wanted a look at just how badly Kentucky’s educational system is failing us, read this story about Kentuckians supporting Donald Trump. You’ll walk away understanding just how easily duped people are – especially in rural Appalachia. You’ll also get another look at just what a dishonest twat Bill Bissett, of the Kentucky Coal Association, is. You know, the man who opposes helping miners get their pensions back because he couldn’t give two shits about anyone but the wealthy (and sometimes imprisoned) coal barons who pay his salary. Oh! You’ll also get yet another glimpse at just how racist and afraid people are as you read yet another exploitative story about Eastern (with a capital E) Kentucky. [NY Times]

A second man has been convicted in connection with a scheme to steal $1.32 million from a contractor who believed he was leveling land for a recycling factory in Manchester. [H-L]

The Affordable Care Act has helped millions of Americans get health insurance. But it’s helping Americans in some parts of the country more than others. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Magoffin County Can’t Catch A Break

Federal jurors have convicted two Magoffin County officials in a vote-fraud scheme in which the judge-executive also was implicated. [H-L]

Donald Trump has been making waves this week ― great waves, terrific waves ― after accusing President Barack Obama of creating ISIS. But earlier this year, he was saying something different: that the U.S. invasion of Iraq created the terrorist group. [HuffPo]

In the latest blow for Catholic Health Initiatives in Kentucky, a jury has returned a $21.2 million verdict against the company and its St. Joseph Hospital London for conspiring with cardiologists to perform unnecessary heart procedures. [C-J/AKN]

The “lock her up” chants started early and came often at Donald Trump’s campaign event near Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Wednesday evening. [BBC]

Eddie Sexton has always held a passion to become a school principal, and now, after 16 years as an educator, he gets to fulfill that goal as the new principal of Daniel Boone Elementary. [Richmond Register]

In 2011, Gene Sperling had a problem. He was working as President Obama’s chief economic advisor but his government salary did not cover his expenses. He and his wife lived in a Georgetown townhouse valued today at around $2 million, but did not have enough equity to qualify for a second mortgage or credit line. He didn’t want to sell the house and he wanted to keep working at a prestigious but relatively low-paid public service job. [ProPublica]

Former Elliott County Clerk Shelia Blevins and her sister, former Elliott County Deputy Clerk Jeannie Moore, were formally sentenced Friday in Franklin Circuit Court to complicity to commit abuse of public trust under $10,000. [Ashland Independent]

The Obama administration on Friday declared a public health emergency in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, saying the rapid and widespread transmission of the Zika virus threatens the health of infected pregnant women and their babies. [Reuters]

From what was described as a “strong pool of candidates from across the country,” the Board of Directors of the Morehead-Rowan County Economic Development Council, Inc., (EDC) has narrowed its search for a new executive director to three or four candidates. [The Morehead News]

Coal mining. Bad management. Runoff from cities and farms. These are all things that are creating major problems for America’s rivers, according to a new report. [ThinkProgress & American Rivers]

In an effort to better serve patients from the Cave City, Park City and Horse Cave areas, T.J. Regional Health has opened the T.J. Health Cave City Clinic. The new clinic at 440 Happy Valley St. provides walk-in medical and injury care. It is staffed with physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and technicians, and is one of several clinics owned by T.J. Regional Health. [Glasgow Daily Times]

BHP Billiton, the world’s largest mining firm by market value, reported a record $6.4 billion annual loss on Tuesday, hammered by a bad bet on shale, a dam disaster in Brazil and a commodities slump. [CNBC]

Kentucky’s Prichard Committee Student Voice Team has received national attention for its advocacy on issues such as increasing school funding in Kentucky. [H-L]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) is not optimistic that he will be in charge of the Senate come November ― and Donald Trump, he implied, is not helping matters. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Remember Pre-9/11 Gary Condit? It’s Gary Condit Flashback Time!

The University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital is ranked No. 1 in Kentucky in U.S. News and World Report’s Best Hospitals survey, which was released Tuesday. [H-L]

Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s campaign chairman, has had success dealing with hard-to-manage dictatorial types, from Imelda Marcos of the Philippines, to Jonas Savimbi of Angola, to Victor Yanukovych of Ukraine. [HuffPo]

The State Plumbing Code Committee has voted to suspend a decades-old rule that business leaders and developers had long viewed as a major impediment to investing in major construction projects. [C-J/AKN]

An attorney for Gary Condit, the former congressman who had an extramarital affair with Washington intern Chandra Levy before her 2001 murder, said on Friday that prosecutors had told the ex-lawmaker that he was not a suspect in the case despite their decision to drop charges against another man. [Reuters]

Acts of kindness towards the Rowan County Sheriff’s Department have not gone unnoticed. Sheriff Matt Sparks says he thanks those who have been showing their support over the last few months during a difficult time for law enforcement across the country. [The Morehead News]

In Syria’s civil war, it’s dangerous to even treat the wounded. Since the beginning of the civil war, the Syrian government has killed hundreds of medical personnel, and dozens of doctors have been assassinated by ISIS. The few doctors who dare to treat the casualties have been forced to work in secret. [ProPublica]

You are Letcher County, Kentucky. You are rural, mountainous, and in the heart of the central Appalachian coalfields. Your economy is not in good shape. Fox News has called your largest town “the poster child for the war on coal.” You are offered funds to build a new federal prison. It could bring jobs but also brings up troubling moral issues. What do you do? [WFPL]

Members of the Indiana State Teachers Association will rally near the annual convention of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) in Indianapolis Friday afternoon where Republican vice presidential nominee Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is speaking on Friday. ALEC, whose members are a mix of representatives of large corporations and legislators, is a group known for drafting model legislation for conservative lawmakers. [ThinkProgress]

If you showed up at the Jeffersontown Police Department with heroin, needles, or prescriptions you might think officers would put you behind bars. But as of Monday, the department is opening its doors to addicts as part of its Angel Initiative. [WAVE3]

Just when it seems that Donald Trump could not display more ignorance and bad judgment or less of a moral compass, he comes up with another ignominy or two. This weekend he denigrated the parents of a fallen American military hero and suggested that if elected he might recognize Russia’s claims to Ukraine and end sanctions. [NY Times]

Atlanta-based United Parcel Service Inc. is enhancing its educational assistance programs for employees at its Worldport facility in Louisville. [Business First]

Donald Trump asked a woman with a crying baby to leave his rally in Ashburn, Virginia, on Tuesday. The GOP nominee initially suggested that he did not mind the disruption. [Politico]

If you’ve yet to read this story, put on your crazy glasses. A report of a car full of men in body armor with semi-automatic weapons brought Lexington police to the Walmart on Richmond Road on Saturday night. Officers found two men, one in body armor, a 20-year-old woman and a six-month old baby. [H-L]

A Donald Trump spokeswoman Tuesday night opened a new front in the GOP nominee’s campaign of insults against the parents of a Muslim-American war hero, this time blaming President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton for the soldier’s death. Khan was killed in 2004 in Iraq, protecting fellow soldiers from a car bomb. You might recall that Obama did not take office until 2009. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]