Poor Kentuckians Will Suffer Under Bevin

Fayette County School District officials say they have found the student responsible for a graffiti threat left in a bathroom at Edythe J. Hayes Middle School. [H-L]

One Middle East catastrophe apparently wasn’t enough for some supporters of the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. So they’ve continued to try to shape policy relating to the region, offering punditry in the wake of each fresh crisis. [HuffPo]

Traveling around rural Clay County, Jennifer Gates seeks out people in need of health coverage. There are plenty of them. From the homeless veteran under a bridge to the low-paid school cafeteria cook, Gates helps them find health coverage through kynect, Kentucky’s version of the Affordable Care Act. [C-J/AKN]

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) on Sunday said Donald Trump’s claim that scores of Arab-Americans cheered as the Twin Towers fell on 9/11 is unsubstantiated. [The Hill]

Members of the Housing Authority of Glasgow’s board of directors were scheduled to approve flat rent increases for the 2016 fiscal year, but action on the issue was tabled, once again. [Glasgow Daily Times]

South America’s vast Amazon region harbors one of the world’s most diverse collection of tree species, but more than half may be at risk for extinction due to ongoing deforestation to clear land for farming, ranching and other purposes, scientists say. [Reuters]

For the 16th holiday season, a local musician is helping provide for those less fortunate. Eddie Riffe organized his first food drive in 1999, when he asked those who visited the AMVETS in Ashland to donate nonperishable foods when they came to hear him perform. [Ashland Independent]

Alberta’s carbon footprint, spurred on by the tar sands industry, has been steadily growing in recent years. So when the New Democratic Party took power in a surprise victory earlier this year, environmentalists hoped it signaled a turning point for Canada’s largest oil-producing province. [ThinkProgress]

Just a little over a year ago, it was “space and shelves,” but no food was stored there. Now, the Colonel’s Cupboard helps feed the one in five Eastern Kentucky University college students who admitted to food insecurity in a study conducted just last year. [Richmond Register]

The ex-GOP House Benghazi Committee investigator who accused the panel of conducting a partisan witch hunt against Hillary Clinton filed suit Monday against the committee and Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) for wrongful termination and defamation. [Politico]

Big news in the hometown of small-minded bigot Kim Davis. A tanker carrying powder used to make concrete overturned on I-64 in Rowan County Monday morning. [The Morehead News]

A US air strike aimed at an IS checkpoint is likely to have killed four civilians, possibly including a child, the US military has said. [BBC]

What the hell is in the water in Lexington to make everyone — from the people still bickering about the election to self-hating Jim Gray — so terrible lately? [H-L]

Donald Trump approves of the way his supporters responded to a Black Lives Matter protester, reportedly beating him during a Saturday rally in Birmingham, Alabama. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Northup Has Crawled Out Of The Darkness

Fayette County Public Schools’ e-school program allows as many as 400 to 500 students who have good reading test scores to take online courses on a full- or part-time basis. [H-L]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

Scott Jennings is attempting to whitewash history in claiming that Ernie Fletcher didn’t lose the election for himself. Almost as fascinating as watching he and his friends try to kiss Matt Bevin’s butt after spending years trashing him. Yes, the Kentucky Democratic Party is burning to the ground. It has been for years. That fire will burn out in a year or so and a new crop of people will take over and flush the Republicans back down the drain. It always happens like that. One party gets into power and turns corrupt, wasteful, awful. Happened to Democrats and it’s about to happen to Republicans again. If Republicans like Scott Jennings can’t see the writing on that wall, then it’s no wonder they always find themselves pleading the fifth when called to the accountability altar. [C-J/AKN]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

Kentucky’s environmental sanctions plummeted under Steve Beshear. Acrid smoke blanketed a neighborhood off Dixie Highway in Southwest Louisville on an unseasonably warm fall day last November. For more than 24 hours, a 30-foot-tall pile of tires burned at Liberty Tire, a tire recycling center on Bohannon Avenue. Those living within a mile of the site were urged to shelter in place. [WFPL]

Oil giant Exxon Mobil is being investigated for misleading the public about the impact of climate change. [BBC]

Good grief, what is going on in the mountains these days? A woman is dead and two people are in the hospital after a triple-shooting in Wolfe County. [WKYT]

After six years of environmental reviews, permitting battles, and vocal opposition from climate activists, the Keystone XL pipeline is officially dead. [ThinkProgress]

Council members, restaurant owners and concerned citizens all came out Monday night for a public form over a 3 percent restaurant tax. [Ashland Independent]

It’s customary for members of the House of Representatives to file an explanation when they miss a vote. These Personal Explanations are a glimpse into the pace and trade-offs inherent in modern government. [ProPublica]

Bob Stivers is straight up lying to you. Sen. Robert Stivers, president of the Kentucky Senate, said here Thursday that the funding shortfall in the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System (KTRS) is not as critical as many believe. [The Morehead News]

Where the lunatics running for president in 2016 stand on immigration, in one chart. [NPR]

The military says about 500 soldiers from the 101st Airborne headquarters at Fort Campbell are deploying to the Middle East to support military actions against the Islamic State group. [H-L]

If countries fail to sustain policies that combat the impacts of climate change while also providing safety nets for the world’s poor, global warming will drive an additional 100 million people into poverty by 2030, a new World Bank report finds. [HuffPo]

Some Monday Evening Gloom And Doom

The most important newspaper in the state has ignored scandal after scandal in Montgomery County, just 20 minutes away from its offices, but has focused non-stop on stupid issues like this. In places hours and hours away. Really, freaking out about a student prank involving bible verses? Really, it’s Nancy Rodriguez all over again. Maybe worse this time. [H-L]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) new book sold fewer than 500 copies in two weeks. TWO WEEKS! Can you imagine? More people wanted Jake’s Kim Davis magnets on Twitter than bought the little man’s new book. [HuffPo]

House Democrats met Friday to talk about moving forward following Tuesday’s devastating losses in statewide elections and to steel themselves against the possibility that some of their members may switch parties or take jobs in the Bevin administration, jeopardizing their party’s hold on the chamber. [C-J/AKN]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Matt London took some time off Thursday from his day job to harvest soybeans on a seven-acre plot near Hiseville-Bear Wallow Road. He, like other grain farmers in the area, is a little later in the year harvesting because of weather, which is the consistent seasonal variable in agriculture. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) says that when it comes to foreign policy, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), a fellow GOP presidential candidate, and Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton are “the same person.” [The Hill]

It’s not every day the richest man in the world visits eastern Kentucky. Bill Gates and his wife Melinda were spotted eating at Texas Roadhouse in Pikeville and snapped cell phone photos of Gates enjoying his meal went viral. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. and coalition forces are likely to increase air strikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria in coming weeks after a lull in September and October, the head of U.S. Air Forces Central Command said Saturday. [Reuters]

Dr. Scott Davison, a professor and department chair at Morehead State University, Tuesday won the three remaining years on the vacant seat on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

The journalists were assassinated on American soil, one after another. Duong Trong Lam was the first. He was 27 years old and ran a Vietnamese-language publication called Cai Dinh Lang, which he mailed to immigrants around the country. A gunman found him as he walked out of his San Francisco apartment building one morning and shot him, a single bullet piercing his pulmonary artery, just above the heart. [ProPublica]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

The State Department has released a new chronology adding perspective to how the diplomatic agency, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and other elements of the U.S. government scrambled to respond to the attack on the U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, on September 11, 2012. [Politico]

Handguns, narcotics and $30,000 in cash were stolen during a break-in of the Simpsonville Police Department, Kentucky State Police said in a release. [H-L]

Surprise! There are a bunch of Kentuckians on this list. The hackivist collective Anonymous released a much-anticipated list of people it claims are members or supporters of the Ku Klux Klan on Thursday night. [HuffPo]

Most Credible Paper In State Ignoring Scandal

Still ignoring the corruption in Montgomery County, it seems. Continuing to address problems that state Auditor Adam Edelen found in 2014, officials with Fayette County Public Schools said Monday that by early 2016 they expect a hot line could be operating for anonymous reports of waste, fraud, abuse and noncompliance. [H-L]

The White House on Monday slammed FBI Director James Comey’s notion that pervasive cellphone footage featuring police actions has led to an uptick in violent crime. [HuffPo]

Now that he’s got a monstrous retirement, of course. Dave Armstrong, former mayor of Louisville and two-term Jefferson County judge-executive, has retired after serving seven years as chairman of the Kentucky Public Service Commission. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon is considering allowing U.S. troops to embed with Iraqi forces. [The Hill]

Really, Paducah, this is what you’ve got time for? Arresting a mother and son for growing two marijuana plants? [WAVE3]

Republican Jeb Bush’s struggling presidential campaign is cutting salaries across the board and reducing staff in a money-saving effort intended to concentrate resources on early voting states, an internal memo said on Friday. It doesn’t help that Jeb Bush is the most boring man on earth. [Reuters]

Oh, now Greg Stumbo cares about human trafficking. Here’s the latest that his Legislative Research Commission staffers have written for him in the hometown paper. [Floyd County Times]

For the first time in a national poll, Ben Carson has overtaken Donald Trump, leading the Manhattan businessman in the CBS News/New York Times survey of Republican primary voters out Tuesday. [Politico]

As Kentucky’s political class tries to divine what’s likely to happen in one of the more unpredictable governor’s races on record, a new publicly released poll shows Democrat Jack Conway with the same persistent five-point lead he’s managed in other polls. [Ronnie Ellis]

In 2002, Texas Supreme Court Justice Xavier Rodriguez, a Republican, lost his seat on the bench to a white lawyer named Steven Wayne Smith. Smith, a fellow Republican who made a name for himself fighting affirmative action at the University of Texas, suggested that Rodriguez had been “underqualified” for his undergraduate education at Harvard. The Houston Chronicle reported that Smith decided to take on Rodriguez because “he thought a Hispanic wouldn’t do well in the Republican primary.” [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

Pedro started getting worried when his hands were so swollen he needed a larger size of plastic gloves. [ThinkProgress]

They give tons of attention to these pointless stories while ignoring educational corruption just 15 minutes away. This willful ignorance is worse than Nancy Rodriguez when she intentionally ignored and covered up for the University of Louisville when we broke the Robert Felner scandal wide open. [H-L]

The black dad that you don’t think exists falls asleep with his son on his chest after rocking him for what felt like forever. His wife transfers the baby from his arms to the crib and coaxes him to bed where he only sleeps for three or four hours. He spent most of his wife’s pregnancy talking about legacy and is determined to create one. So he rises at 3:30 in the morning to take photographs of the city at its emptiest. He has to be to work at 7 and knows he won’t have the energy to chase his dreams after a dehumanizing 12 hour shift. [HuffPo]

Election 2015: Why KY Can’t Have Nice Things

In their last debate before voters go to the polls next Tuesday, Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway continued to trade jabs, but in the end, one candidate did manage to compliment the other. [H-L]

Just before midnight on Monday, congressional lawmakers and the White House tentatively agreed on a major budget deal that would end such standoffs in the Obama presidency and solve a potentially catastrophic debt default coming within days. [HuffPo]

Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway picked up Monday where they left off on Sunday, bickering over whether Conway cut his office’s budget and whether he has been a leader fighting the Environmental Protection Agency on coal issues. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama’s most senior national security advisers have recommended measures that would move U.S. troops closer to the front lines in Iraq and Syria, officials said, a sign of mounting White House dissatisfaction with progress against the Islamic State and a renewed Pentagon push to expand military involvement in long-running conflicts overseas. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin, the Republican running for governor who’s been called a “pathological liar” in ads by his opponent, Democrat Jack Conway, told Conway to “stop lying to people” during a contentious debate Sunday evening at Eastern Kentucky University. [Ronnie Ellis]

Rand Paul, once again, proves he’s dumb as hell. And maybe a maniacal racist just like his daddy? Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is warning that democratic socialism, embraced by fellow presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders (I-Sesame Street), can lead to a government that will “exterminate” people who step out of line. [The Hill]

Crews working at the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal site in Fleming County are about halfway finished with construction, according to onsite officials. The Walker Company is in charge of completing the cap that will include a geo-synthetic liner, according to Scott Wilburn and Jeff Webb, who work with the Kentucky Environmental Cabinet. [Ledger Independent]

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on Friday denounced as “pathetic” and “totally ridiculous” a Republican congressman’s call to impeach her on her first day in office if she is elected to the White House next year. [Reuters]

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths. [WFPL]

Here’s an OH SNAP moment for Hobby Lobby. It’s always the christianists pulling corrupt moves like this. One of America’s most famously Christian businesses is amassing a vast collection of Biblical antiquities. The problem is some of them may have been looted from the Middle East. [TDB]

Forbes says Kentucky is one of the nation’s worst for labor supply. A new Forbes magazine ranking indicates that Kentucky has gaps to close to become a premiere state for doing business. [Business First]

Here are 13 crazy-ass things Ben Carson actually believes. [ThinkProgress]

Oh, looky, Dale Emmons/Jerry Lundergan pal, Jack Brammer, has written a half-baked story about the race for Commissioner of Agriculture. Why isn’t he moved to the role of editor or “retired”? The paper has tons of people who do a better job. [H-L]

A Yemeni hospital run by medical aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) was hit by a Saudi-led air strike, the group said on Tuesday, the latest bombing of a civilian target in the seven-month air campaign in Yemen. [HuffPo]

Is This Dang Race Over Yet? Ugh

With a little more than a week to go until Election Day, tempers are flaring in the race for governor, and Republican Matt Bevin brought some sharp elbows and questionable claims to Sunday night’s debate against Democrat Jack Conway. [H-L]

Early in the summer of 2013, Sarah Karp was reading through a report on a Board of Education Meeting when she came across something suspicious. Buried in the report was a notice that the Board had voted to approve a $20.5 million no-bid contract to a company called SUPES to provide professional development for principals. [HuffPo]

We’ll know who Kentucky’s next governor is in just over a week, and it’s still up in the air as to whether Democrat Jack Conway or Matt Bevin will win. [C-J/AKN]

While humanitarian groups and religious charities across the country are urging the U.S. to open its arms to refugees fleeing the bloody conflicts in Syria and Iraq, a number of bloggers and political pundits are beating the drums of intolerance, using conspiracy theories and anti-Muslim rhetoric to mobilize the American public against accepting migrants escaping war. Several of the leading voices in this effort are sponsored by Robert Shillman, a wealthy donor to conservative causes who lives in Rancho Santa Fe, a suburb of San Diego. [The Intercept]

Adam Edelen, the Democratic state auditor seeking re-election, is considered one of the Kentucky Democrat Party’s best young politicians, perhaps even a challenger next year for Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair acknowledged the 2003 invasion of Iraq played a part in the rise of the Islamic State militant group, and apologized for some mistakes in planning the war, in an interview broadcast on Sunday. [Reuters]

A new statewide survey shows the average price of retail food items has dropped for the third straight quarter in Kentucky. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Low-carbon electricity, not gas, is the cheapest way to keep lights on and meet carbon targets, says the government’s climate advisory panel. [BBC]

Ashland Community and Technical College’s Adult Learning Center is offering free General Education Development Ready testing to any one in need of earning the GED certificate. [Ashland Independent]

A Milwaukee hospital is trying a new approach to get newly insured residents to stop using emergency rooms as their main source of medical care and develop relationships with doctors instead. [NPR]

At NewCity Morehead’s regular meeting Wednesday, Judge-Executive Walter Blevins offered his opinion about Rowan Fiscal Court’s decision to keep the old courthouse square and all of its structures intact. [The Morehead News]

It’s like they did a case study about everything Joshua Powell and his people have perpetrated against countless individuals. From attempting to paint school employees as “whores” and folks reporting the news as “cross-dressers” to trying to play the victim. This summer, American Psychologist, the official journal of the American Psychological Association, released a special issue on the topic of bullying and victimization. [New Yorker]

Tucked away off a narrow country road in Clark County, in the middle of a farm, 27 acres of hemp grew all summer. Now, the plants will be harvested and processed. [H-L]

Nearly a decade before the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education made segregated schooling of black students unconstitutional, a group of five Mexican-American families fought for integrated schools in Mendez v. Westminster. [HuffPo]

UK Wastes Your Tax Dollars Yet Again

Laughable that the University of Kentucky, with your taxpayer dollars, would attempt to threaten a business for using the word “Kentucky”. [H-L]

President Barack Obama tackled the opioid epidemic on Wednesday by telling health care providers across the country that access to medication-assisted treatment must be expanded. [HuffPo]

Louisville fines don’t stop chronic polluters. A continued manufacturing base and coal-fired electricity helped Jefferson County rank fourth in the nation for industrial toxic air pollution in 2014, up one ranking from the year before, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [C-J/AKN]

Ben Carson has knocked Donald Trump off of the top spot in Iowa for the first time since July, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

State auditors found no issues with the 2014 financial statement of Metcalfe County Clerk Carol England Chaney. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. Marine General Joseph Dunford, who took over this month as America’s top military officer, pledged on Tuesday to seek new ways to build momentum in Iraq’s battle against Islamic State and bucked descriptions of the conflict as a “stalemate.” [Reuters]

Jared Arnett, executive director of Shaping Our Appalachian Region, talked to the Ashland Rotary Club about progress the group is making to enrich the economy in eastern Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Iceland is hunting for Rand Paul! [BBC]

During a special-called meeting on Monday, Harlan County Industrial Development Chairman Harry Gibson updated the board members on the findings regarding a $460,000 debt the Harlan County Fiscal Court said they owed. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Yanira, a 41-year-old Guatemalan national, left her home country with her three children because their lives were in danger from gang violence. She and her family arrived in Texas in February — but they were soon put in an immigration detention center for two months. Yanira now lives in San Antonio, Texas as she awaits her court date for her asylum case. But she said that her experience in a family detention center left her scarred. [ThinkProgress]

State-level data shows that fewer school children who do not qualify for free or reduced-price school lunches are paying full price for meals, Katherine Ralston and Constance Newman report for Amber Waves, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. [Hazard Herald]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Democrats appear to be winning the TV ad war in Kentucky with less than two weeks left until voters pick a new governor and choose a slate of statewide constitutional officers. [H-L]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]