Election Fraud in Kentucky? Not Much

Attorney General Jack Conway’s office just released election fraud hotline results from yesterday. The OAG received 60 calls from 28 counties (27 calls were received during the 2007 primary and 86 during the general election), the majority of which came from county officials and voters with procedural questions. Electioneering was the common complaint and get this– THERE WERE NO COMPLAINTS OF VOTE-BUYING! Can you believe it?

Election Fraud Hotline Calls

  • 19 Miscellaneous Election Calls
  • 13 Election Official Complaints
  • 8 Procedural or Legal Questions
  • 5 Electioneering Complaints
  • 4 Disrupting the Polls Allegations
  • 3 Voting Machine Complaints
  • 2 Residency Questions
  • 2 Exit Polling Complaints
  • 1 Voter Identification Complaint
  • 1 Special or Absentee Ballot Question
  • 1 Media Call
  • 1 Campaign Violation Allegation

Fischer Campaign Finance Ruh Ro Dept

Take XVII.

Greg Fischer’s April 30th FEC report indicated that he had about $124K on-hand. Of that $124K about $115K was money that could only be used in the general election.

On Friday May 2, Fischer made a $160K TV buy statewide, which means that he either dropped a bunch of his own money and didn’t file that within the 24-hour requirement with the FEC– to inform them that he’s activating the Millionaires’ Amendment, he received a bunch of contributions without reporting them or is using general election funds for primary purposes.

Since the pre-primary report in 24-hour notices, he’s had about $20K come in. No other updates have been filed with the FEC.

We spoke via email with a representative of the Fischer campaign on Friday who told us that Fischer hadn’t dropped in any more of his own money and that he wasn’t using general election funds for primary activity. For the record: We waited six days to run with this story– out of courtesy– just in case the Fischer campaign had neglected to file paperwork or something. But no dice.

So. What’s going on here, Fischer? You’ve got some explaining to do. If you’re not breaking the law this time, then please stop with the appearance of impropriety. And stop pulling this egregious crap so you aren’t hit with FEC fines. This is getting embarrassing.

Fischer’s FEC Report: You’re Gonna Love This

Thanks to friends in Washington, D.C., we’ve gotten our hands on Greg Fischer’s first quarterly FEC report. Oh man. Where to begin?

Once we got over the fact that most of his money is just from rich family members and friends, we discovered that Fischer has $110,000 in funds he cannot use in the Primary, only in the General Election. So the reality is he has a whole lot less on-hand than his campaign has boasted. That is not fundraising strength.

He took out a strange $34,294.31 loan from Fidelity Investments to help get his contribution to the campaign over the $500,000 mark, raising the question of whether or not Fischer actually has enough liquidity when it comes to his own personal finances to drop more in. He apparently isn’t as wealthy and free with his money has he espoused in the run-up to reporting.

There were no disbursements to Dant Clayton Corp for all of the exploratory expenses he had– we were the first to report this months ago. Appears as if Greg Fischer’s campaign knowingly allowed his corporation to make a contribution to his campaign. You’ll recall that the issue was so major that the Republican Party filed an FEC complaint against Fischer as a result of our investigation. This is a big deal. If the Fischer campaign really believed it was insignificant as it alleged months ago, you’d see a reimbursement on the report like his camp said there would be.

It gets better. Juicy, juicy. Tons more after the jump…

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Party for Seven? That’ll be $50K

A quick and final update on the story we’ve been following with the Thunder party for legislators. Looks like those lobbyists who picked up the tab for the party paid around $50K and entertained seven, yes, seven, legislators.

Sounds like the attendance at a Doug Hawkins informational meeting on Dixie Highway in Louisville.

Great work by the C-J’s Joe Gerth in actually calling all the legislators and getting their takes on attending the party, including Louisville’s Gerald Neal, who passed on going after learning it was paid for by lobbyists, according to Gerth’s story.

Much more, including names of the two Democrats who ignorantly attended the soirée after the jump…

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FBI Investigates Fletcher Transportation Cabinet

The FBI is investigating the Fletcher administration’s highway construction award process. Tom Loftus reports that the federal probe “includes a look at whether the cabinet’s confidential cost estimates for contracts were leaked to bidders before bids were submitted.”

All of this comes in the wake of the resignation of James W. Rummage, a former chief district engineer under Fletcher.

James W. Rummage had worked for Fletcher, a Republican, as chief district engineer in District 7 since 2004. The district covers Fayette and 11 other counties. Before that he ran the neighboring District 9 for six years under Democratic Gov. Paul Patton.

Reached at his Morehead home Tuesday, Rummage said it was his decision to leave but wouldn’t say why. He wouldn’t comment on whether he had been interviewed by or provided information to the FBI.

“There’s nothing I can help you out with right now. There’s nothing I can say right now,” he said.

Long story short: this doesn’t smell pretty. Hold onto your hats, folks, because we hear there’s way more where this comes from.

The sound you hear is a couple Republicans complaining about this being front-page news. Like it wouldn’t be if Beshear’s crew was involved. Please.

FEC Begins Investigating Greg Fischer

So much for the slow news day. Like Shackleford says, the Federal Election Commission has no doubt begun their investigation into alleged campaign finance violations by Greg Fischer in the run up to announcing his bid for the U.S. Senate. Read all about that here, here and here.

You’ll recall that we detailed potential FEC violations throughout the first two weeks of January, prompting Louisville/Jefferson County Republican Party Chairman Jack Richardson to file a complaint against Fischer.

Take a peek at what FEC staffers have been researching today:


CLICK TO ENLARGE

Search terms galore like “Fischer FEC Violations” and various others. And before you ask, we did contact the FEC and they refuse to comment on “what may or may not be an ongoing investigation.” So. There you go.

Say No To Casinos Possibly Violating Law

Is 501(c)3 organization Say No To Casinos led by John Mark Hack and Kent Ostrander violating the law? Quite possibly.

A new complaint filed by a prominent figure in Kentucky politics (names and identifying information have been redacted to protect identities for the time being) before the Internal Revenue Service alleges the anti-casino group is involved in a political campaign and has engaged in excessive lobbying activities for the past three years.

Multiple examples of excessive lobbying can be found in media archives and archives from the Kentucky General Assembly from 2006, 2007 and 2008 by the Kentucky nonprofit 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization, Say No To Casinos . The organization’s website, http://www.saynocasino.com/, exhibits multiple examples of excessive lobbying.

From the organization’s first press release it is apparent the 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization, Say No To Casinos are participating in excessive lobbying activities.

-SNIP-

Say No To Casinos spokesman, John Mark Hack, admits in a January 1, 2007 Lexington Herald Leader article on casino gaming that he participates in lobbying activities, he says John Mark Hack, spokesman for the coalition Say No to Casinos, said by his unofficial vote count, a gambling measure would not have nearly enough support to pass”, This is solid proof that he is in constant contact with members of the Kentucky General
Assembly in regards to casino gaming or gambling legislation in Kentucky.

-SNIP-

Say No To Casinos, has made multiple statements in the 2008 session of the Kentucky General Assembly in regards to their excessive lobbying activities and their mission to lobby against any casino and or gambling legislation in Kentucky.

View the full IRS complaint and supporting exhibits below: