Kim Davis Just Won’t Effing Quit It

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

In a speech last week, Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen inadvertently told us why Congress should set a 4 percent unemployment target for the Fed in its conduct of monetary policy, as is proposed in a new bill put forward by Michigan Representative John Conyers. The context was Yellen’s dismissal of such a target. [HuffPo]

Don Childers and others affiliated with Childers Oil Co. combined to give $4,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party this summer while Governor Steve Beshear’s administration was negotiating a secret settlement with the company over a 2011 spill of diesel fuel into the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is the favorite to succeed John Boehner (R-OH) after his surprise resignation as the House Speaker last week. The appointment of McCarthy, who represents a heavily Latino district, to preside over a more radically conservative Republican caucus could have implications for immigration reform. [ThinkProgress]

Ann Stewart, executive director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, has been reappointed to serve another term on the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Secret Service reportedly leaked sensitive personal information to the press about Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz as the Utah Republican was investigating the beleaguered agency. [Politico]

Steve Beshear’s lawyers are using the words “absurd,” ”forlorn” and “obtuse” to describe the legal arguments a county clerk has used to avoid issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [WAVE3]

Can we quit it with calling Drew Curtis “quirky”? It’s an insult from a bunch of old-ass white men and seems to get thrown around a lot lately. The only people who think he is quirky are people who have no idea what “URL” means. And can we quit acting like the RGA pulled out because Bevin sucks? Sure, he sucks, but the RGA’s man on the ground said six months ago their budget was $3 million. RGA never thought Bevin could win, really. Which is worse than abandoning him now. [Larry Sabato]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) daddy hauled in more money in one day than he’s raised in three months. Surprising that anyone thinks his presidential campaign is anything more than a stunt to raise his senate campaign profile. [Mother Jones]

Attorneys for a Magoffin County judge have asked the Kentucky Supreme Court to review a lower court decision that would force the judge out of office for election fraud. [WKYT]

In an interview with NPR, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says his country will use its added billions of dollars from the nuclear deal for boosting the Iranian economy. [NPR]

This year’s Historic Paris-Bourbon County house tour Sunday is at the boyhood home of one of Kentucky’s most interesting and least known Civil War generals, who ended his short life as an American diplomat in South America. [H-L]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

KSBA-Thayer Slap Fight Heating Up

The debate over when to begin the school year in Kentucky is revving up. The Kentucky School Boards Association board of directors is opposing a proposal by two lawmakers — Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, and state Sen. Chris Girdler, R-Somerset — that would prevent schools from starting classes each year earlier than the Monday closest to Aug. 26. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

Coal-fired power plants will need to make sure they don’t exceed new limits on toxic effluent into waterways like the Ohio River or others across Kentucky and Indiana. [C-J/AKN]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

Hundreds of thousands of people who enrolled in health insurance coverage through the federal marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act lost coverage this year because of problems with their immigration and citizenship status. But for immigrants who have settled in Kentucky, there has been no similar enrollment problem or wave of cancellations, state officials say. [WFPL]

The Obama administration is poised this week to issue a final rule on ozone levels that business groups contend would be the single most expensive regulation ever imposed by the U.S. government. [The Hill]

Sheriff Bobby Jack Woods said, after nearly a year into his first term, his greatest accomplishment so far is fostering inter-department law enforcement cooperation with Boyd County agencies. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. airport security agents discovered a record 67 firearms in luggage passengers intended to carry on to airplanes during one week in September, according to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). [Reuters]

Here comes more mainstream tripe ignoring the very real mental health issues at play. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The U.S. government has labeled as specially designated terrorists two French fugitives who during the past 15 years have risen from street crime to alleged front-line roles in the Charlie Hebdo attacks and terrorist violence in Tunisia and Syria. [ProPublica]

Preliminary reports show that student enrollment is down slightly for the fall semester at Morehead State University. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. veteran obesity rate has reached 80 percent, surpassing that of the general population. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says that more than 165,000 veterans who use its health care services have a body mass index higher than 40, a threshold that interferes with basic physical functions and leads to chronic illness. [ThinkProgress]

Republican Presidential candidate Rand Paul will campaign with Kentucky’s Republican nominee for governor in Frankfort on Saturday. [H-L]

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday it is weighing new rules governing the $1.3 trillion student loan market after releasing a stinging report documenting “widespread failures” in an industry largely overseen by the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin Is Trying To Lose The Race

Attorney General Jack Conway maintains a nominal five-point lead over Republican Matt Bevin with just more than a month to go in Kentucky’s race for governor, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [H-L]

Is Matt Bevin trying to lose the race for governor? Yes. But so is Jack Conway. [More H-L]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet agreed this month to keep secret a proposed settlement of its lawsuit against an Eastern Kentucky oil company that had been repeatedly cited for contaminating the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a final version of updated rules intended to keep farmworkers from being poisoned by pesticides. [NPR]

The Glasgow City Council passed a new city ordinance regarding the humane treatment of animals following a second reading at Monday’s meeting, setting limits to how long dogs may be tethered to a single point and specifying the equipment to be used and the manner in which tethering can legally occur within city limits. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Royal Dutch Shell has stopped Arctic oil and gas exploration off the coast of Alaska after “disappointing” results from a key well in the Chukchi Sea. [BBC]

Steam rolled off a large tray of sorghum juice as it simmered at 235 degrees, filling the Old Mill Park with a smell unique to the cane plant. Last weekend marked the 45th annual Sorghum Festival. Despite the gloomy weather, a large crowd walked though downtown West Liberty enjoying the local craft bazaar, parade, homemade snacks, fair food and of course — freshly made sorghum. [Ashland Independent]

Earlier this month, the Brookings Institution, a centrist think tank, published a provocatively titled paper that posited, “Do we already have universal preschool?” Revitalizing the fierce debate over early childhood education, the paper concluded that 70 percent of children already have an option for pre-K, infuriating many who have been making pushes for public funding of universal pre-K. [ThinkProgress]

James Comer said he plans to start a business and return home to Monroe County once his term is over in December. What he didn’t mention is toying with a run for congress. [WHAS11]

Immigrants and their descendants will drive U.S. population growth over the next half century, transforming the country into one where no racial or ethnic group is a majority, a Pew Research Center report released on Monday said. [Reuters]

Whether this hilarious take from organized labor about Matt Bevin’s running mate is true or not? You already know she’s a piece of work. [AFL-CIO]

One of the three super PACs supporting Rand Paul’s presidential campaign has stopped raising money, dealing a damaging blow to an already cash-starved campaign. And the guy running his campaign into the ground? His name is Doug Stafford. [Politico]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Ivo Caers confirmed for us Table 21 was never reported to the FDA. … We know now what’s behind the tables: The little girls with the lactating breasts … and the little boys even under ten who have gynecomastia. My word. [HuffPo]

Remember The Jack-Kinder Morgan Fun?

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is taking the lead in an investigation of whether black Fayette County Public Schools employees are victims of discrimination. [H-L]

At CVS pharmacies in 12 states, friends and family members of people suffering from opiate addiction will now be able to get the overdose reversal drug naloxone without a prescription. Just not in Kentucky. [HuffPo]

Society may be getting more politically correct, but there’s new evidence that the trend hasn’t trickled down to operating rooms. [C-J/AKN]

Now random gays are trying to fame whore on the back of bigoted Kim Davis. And big city shysters are hyping it up. [TDB]

Members of a task force appointed by Gov. Steve Beshear to develop recommendations to shore up Kentucky’s teacher retirement system are fast learning it won’t be easy. The group’s consultant, William B. “Flick” Fornia of Pension Trust Advisors, ran through a number of potential options Friday but several of them met with concerned questions from members of the group. [Ronnie Ellis]

Rumors of Donald Trump’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated. Ever since rival Carly Fiorina was widely perceived to have bested Trump at the second GOP debate in California on Sept. 16, media outlets have been lining up to suggest that the front-runner is waning. [The Hill]

When Louisa West Elementary first-grade report cards go out on October 12, parents will not see the traditional A-B-C-D-F grading system. Instead, they will see a detailed list, written in plain English, assessing their children’s mastery of specific skills. [Ashland Independent]

A proposed four-year labor agreement between Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV and the United Auto Workers union encountered strong opposition from rank-and-file union members in early ratification voting. [Reuters]

The Madison County School District collected $238,720 less in property tax than state projections, according to a report during the district’s budget meeting Thursday evening. [Richmond Register]

For the second time this year, a speech by a foreign leader to Congress caused American politics to come to a standstill. But the pope’s remarks were the polar opposite of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s on March 3—they united more people than they divided, and they spoke with such humility and other-centeredness that they seemed to be coming from a village priest, rather than the head of a church with 1.2 billion adherents. [Politico]

It’s been a few months since any new information has been released about Kinder Morgan’s plan to repurpose the Tennessee Gas pipeline through Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

Khaled Alkojak is one of the few Syrians to have made it to the U.S. since the start of the Syrian civil war. Even here, though, the 31-year-old remains in limbo, unsure of how long he’ll be allowed to stay. [NPR]

At the Red Mile, horse racing evolves into something that looks like a casino. Because that’s what it is — a casino. [H-L]

The day that Pope Francis asked Americans to respond humanely to refugees and other migrants, GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee dismissed the idea of being welcoming — insisting it could lead to admitting “some of the most violent and vicious people on Earth.” [HuffPo]

Another Day, Another Bad UofL Story

In his address to Congress, Pope Francis praised the American Thomas Merton as “a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people.” [H-L]

Americans like to think of our country as a nation of immigrants and a nation of religions, but repeatedly we have failed to live up to our ideals, banishing fellow citizens from the American family because of their ethnicities or religious commitments. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville Foundation voted Thursday to decline booster J.D. Nichols’ offer to use part of his $10 million gift pledged to the school to pay off past bonuses for President James Ramsey and other top administrators. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton unveiled a plan on Wednesday to lower out-of-pocket health costs, including expanded coverage of sick visits to the doctor and tax credits for those with substantial medical bills. [Reuters]

Members of the Barren Fiscal Court’s Solid Waste Committee were given copies of nuisance ordinances from other cities and counties to review on Friday, with the idea they will come up with some ideas for improving Barren County’s nuisance ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

After winning a contentious gender discrimination suit filed by Reddit’s former interim CEO Ellen Pao, Silicon Valley’s top venture capital firm is looking to diversify its staff — starting with its leadership. [ThinkProgress]

The Richmond City Commission voted 3-2 Tuesday night against a property tax rate that would have increased revenue from that source by 4 percent. [Richmond Register]

As Trump prepared to attend events with Sen. Tim Scott and the state’s African American Chamber of Commerce, national Republican leaders are saying his candidacy is pushing the party backwards on matters of race and inclusiveness. [Politico]

When Kentucky Republicans last agreed to conduct a caucus to choose their presidential preference some said it would draw more candidates than just favorite son, Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country’s obesity epidemic is far from over. [NPR]

State Rep. Rocky Adkins said Maysville Community and Technical College (MCTC) is getting closer to meeting its fundraising goal for the construction of a new Rowan Campus. [The Morehead News]

Pope Francis has told the US Congress that the US must see migrants as “persons” and not as “numbers”. [BBC]

he Franklin County School Board has decided to seek public input before permitting posters that say “In God We Trust” in local schools. [H-L]

A Chinese aircraft performed an unsafe maneuver during an air intercept of a U.S. spy plane last week, a Pentagon spokesman said on Tuesday, an incident revealed just as Chinese President Xi Jinping kicks off a week-long U.S. visit. But it was the latest in a series of moves by China seen as an assertion of the expanding reach of its military. This month, five Chinese Navy ships sailed in the Bering Sea off Alaska as U.S. President Barack Obama toured the U.S. state. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Goes Full Fox Fame Whore

Weighing in on an open-records case involving some of Kentucky’s most vulnerable residents, a divided state Supreme Court ruled Thursday that an advocacy group failed to qualify for access to documents related to the deaths of some people in the state’s care. [H-L]

A young girl from California delivered a message about immigration reform to Pope Francis on Wednesday and received a blessing in return for her efforts. [HuffPo]

What was that, again, about not wanting the spotlight? Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis said in an interview Wednesday with Fox News that she was prepared to stay in jail as long as necessary to defend her decision on marriage licenses. [C-J/AKN]

Growth in the U.S. manufacturing sector showed no month-over-month change during September, staying at August’s sluggish pace which was the weakest in almost two years, according to an industry report released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

The development of a homeless shelter is something officials with the Glasgow Service Unit of the Salvation Army have discussed at its board meetings. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In Alabama, anti-drug fervor and abortion politics have turned a meth-lab law into the country’s harshest weapon against pregnant women. [ProPublica]

The two women running to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor squared off in a debate sponsored by the League of Women Voters on Wednesday evening at Midway College in Versailles, mostly sticking to campaign talking points. But there were a few fireworks toward the end. [Ronnie Ellis]

Few things strike fear into the hearts of politicians like a disgruntled grandparent entering a voting booth. [ThinkProgress]

Good-paying jobs exist in Kentucky, but employers are having difficulty finding workers skilled enough to fill positions, according to Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. [Ashland Independent]

Millions of kids, some as young as 5, now get their schooling online. Just one problem: Nobody knows how well it works. [Politico]

Kelly Bowman knew he was going to be a Kentucky State Police trooper when he was a little boy. His career has always brought him home. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. government says the fingerprints of five times as many people as originally believed were included in the data hacked from Office of Personnel Management computers earlier this year. [NPR]

Every Republican presidential candidate who could be in the room with Pope Francis during the pontiff’s address Thursday to Congress – that is, every senator – was there. Except one. [H-L]

With less than two weeks before the start of the new Supreme Court session, Justice Antonin Scalia is still lamenting Obergefell v. Hodges, the June ruling that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide. [HuffPo]

Morehead’s Kinda Maybe Stressed A Bit

A federal judge in Wyoming says it’s tough luck that the world’s largest private coal company doesn’t dig a 1970s-era protest song. [H-L]

Chinese president Xi Jinping is leaving behind a struggling economy as he visits the United States this week. That is worrying leaders of other countries that do business with China, including the United States, and is sure to be a topic of discussion when Xi meets with President Barack Obama on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Whenever one of these lobbyists tries to tell you they’re just a common man or woman? Laugh in their face. [C-J/AKN]

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on Tuesday laid out a stark choice for the cash-strapped city as he proposed a 2016 budget aimed at resolving a financial crisis linked to unfunded pensions — either slash vital public safety and other services, or enact the biggest-ever property tax increase. [Reuters]

Guess we can all look forward to another couple years of only reporting fluff about the state’s Commissioner of Education, regardless of what happens. [WDRB]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

A day late means Barren County’s real estate tax revenue will be approximately $94,224 less this fiscal year than it could have been. [Glasgow Daily Times]

NPR follows up on the status of “AK,” one of many Afghan and Iraqi interpreters for the U.S. military still waiting for a visa, and why thousands of interpreters struggle with the process. [NPR]

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes wants all eligible Kentucky voters to be able to register online by next year’s elections. [Ronnie Ellis]

Pope Francis waded into politics during brief remarks on Wednesday at the White House, touching on climate change, immigration and religious liberty before a packed South Lawn audience. [The Hill]

Much of Monday’s regular City Council meeting was discussion about issues facing Morehead. [The Morehead News]

Arne Duncan has tried to reshape American schools. Now will the backlash erase his legacy? [Politico]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

A little over a year ago, Sister Mary Scullion received an unexpected call from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The church, she was told, was making plans for the World Meeting of Families — the international Catholic festival that Pope Francis will visit in the city this week — and they needed her help. [HuffPo]