What’s Going On With The Glasgow PD?

A $62 million construction contract with D.W. Wilburn Inc. for a new Lexington high school has been approved by the Fayette County school board. [H-L]

The U.N.’s Paris climate conference, designed to reach a plan for curbing global warming, may instead become the graveyard for its defining goal: to stop temperatures rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. [HuffPo]

Imagine waking up after a serious accident to discover you’ve become an unwitting subject in a medical study without ever agreeing to participate. [C-J/AKN]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ashland Alliance President Tim Gibbs told the city commission its town is “just maintaining,” instead of either growing or shrinking economically. Gibbs said his joint-chamber of commerce for Greenup and Boyd counties, however, is trying to grow Ashland again — the most recent step in this direction being to achieve Work Ready certification. [Ashland Independent]

Several U.S. Senators and military lawyers say they are concerned by Col. Norm Allen’s attempts to thwart an investigation into why the U.S. Military built an unneeded luxury headquarters in Afghanistan. [ProPublica]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A new species of ancient human has been unearthed in the Afar region of Ethiopia, scientists report. [BBC]

FEMA has released the most recent numbers for persons receiving federal assistance since the severe storms in April. A total of 1,800 persons registered for aid in Kentucky and 116 were Rowan Countians. [The Morehead News]

After seven years on the outs, choice is back. For the first time since 2008, significantly more Americans identify as pro-choice (50 percent) than pro-life (44 percent), according to a Gallup poll released Friday. [Mother Jones]

Join BGT deTours on June 3 at 6:00* pm in Frankfort, KY for tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion and the Old State Capitol. [Click the Clicky]

In a signed letter submitted to the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday, 136 House Democrats called on the Obama administration to end the practice of detaining Central American mothers and children in family detention facilities. [ThinkProgress]

This is what happens when good old boy rednecks ignore court orders, trample on mental health, act above the law. [H-L]

The FBI is operating a small air force with scores of low-flying planes across the U.S. carrying video and, at times, cellphone surveillance technology — all hidden behind fictitious companies that are fronts for the government, The Associated Press has learned. [HuffPo]

Jamie Comer Beats That Dead Horse

This was Jamie Comer’s laughable press release yesterday: Commissioner Comer is currently in Florida spending time with his family. He will issue a statement tomorrow afternoon about the next steps he will take in this race. [Press Release]

A statewide recanvass of vote totals in the Republican race for governor showed no substantial changes, Secretary of State Alison Lundergran Grimes said Thursday afternoon. But Jamie Comer still might push for a recount. [H-L]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

Citing serious and persistent problems with Kentucky’s food stamp program, federal authorities have warned state officials they must fix the problems quickly or risk losing federal funds the state uses to run the program that helps the poor buy food. [C-J/AKN]

Mitch McConnell said Tuesday the chances are “pretty slim” that Republicans will grow their majority in the U.S. Senate in 2016, saying his goal is to preserve the majority for what he hopes will be a Republican president. [AP]

Nope, the recanvass didn’t change anything. Check out the results in each county. [Click the Clicky]

The Justice Department will not ask the U.S. Supreme Court to stay an appellate court ruling that President Barack Obama’s move to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation should remain on hold, a spokesman said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Bullitt County magistrates have fired a controversial animal control officer and shelter director. [WDRB]

How federal dollars are financing the water crisis in the West. [ProPublica]

Hundreds of people in Eastern Kentucky in danger of losing their disability payments may soon be part of a lawsuit against the federal government. [WYMT]

The US state of Nebraska has abolished the death penalty after a veto-override was passed through its legislature. [BBC]

There is a man holding a knife to the throat of a woman. A person gets out of their car, has a hammer in their hand and advances, yelling. [The Morehead News]

Many of us have old prescription drugs sitting around in medicine cabinets — so what’s the best way to get rid of them? Some folks simply toss old pills in the garbage, or down the toilet. [NPR]

Jean-Marie is dumb enough to think no one will see right through her desire to open an Western Kentucky office. Using taxpayer dollars to eliminate a commute for her? Right, sure, let’s do that. Kentucky has unlimited funds. [H-L]

The House of Representatives will quickly get down to unfinished business once it returns from the holiday recess: defending trading partners that engage in slavery. [HuffPo]

See, What Had Happened Was…

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

Defrauded student loan borrowers seeking relief from the Obama administration are confronting an Education Department process that a senior House Democrat compared to the government’s bungled response to the mortgage robo-signing crisis that shook the U.S. housing market. [HuffPo]

Marathon Petroleum isn’t having a good week. First, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway filed suit over the company’s gas prices, claiming monopolistic practices that Conway said have forced Kentucky customers — particularly those in Louisville and Northern Kentucky — to pay more at the pump than they should. [C-J/AKN]

Outside conservative groups are pressuring GOP leaders to take up targeted immigration reforms ahead of the 2016 elections. [The Hill]

A total of 6,885 Madison County voters cast ballots in Tuesday’s primary election for statewide offices. No local or federal offices were on the ballot. [Richmond Register]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

The Fairview Board of Education named its new superintendent Tuesday, just days after a blistering report from the Kentucky Office of Educational Accountability found retiring superintendent Bill Musick had violated and impeded state education law in several areas. [Ashland Independent]

Partisan mudslinging breaks out, suggesting that lawmakers and cop-reform advocates have a long way to go to find agreement on new police standards. [Politico]

Barren County Fiscal Court’s proposed budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year got a couple of amendments Tuesday during the first reading of the ordinance adopting it, one of which has stirred confusion. [Glasgow Daily Times]

All 50 states could become wind energy producers, according to an Energy Department report released Tuesday, once the next generation of larger, taller turbines in development hits the market. [NY Times]

The disaster recovery center in Rowan County will close at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 21. [The Morehead News]

A search for a racist word and “house” on Google takes you to the home of the US President, Barack Obama. [BBC]

A bankruptcy attorney and a state representative, both hailing from Eastern Kentucky, will face off for state treasurer this fall. [H-L]

After hearing story after story from voters on the campaign trail about heroin’s toll, Hillary Clinton instructed her policy team to draw up solutions to the burgeoning opiate epidemic. [HuffPo]

Student Loan Servicing Is A Mess

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]



William Hilton Paul, son of U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., pleaded guilty Tuesday to driving under the influence in Lexington. [H-L]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday launched a broad review of the often murky business of student loan servicing, questioning whether the roughly 40 million Americans with student debt are being treated fairly under a patchwork of rules and market forces that could leave them vulnerable to abuse. [HuffPo]

Many small towns in Appalachian Kentucky look a lot like Austin, Ind.; a picture of rural America with its shop-lined Main Street and stubble-filled cornfields — and the unlikely epicenter of the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana’s history. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) is adding cyber liability to its insurance coverage provided to member counties beginning July 1. [Ashland Independent]

What happens when you’ve been kicking the fiscal can down the road for years, but the road suddenly hits a dead end? That’s what Chicago – and the state of Illinois – are about to find out. [ProPublica]

A differing of understandings of which classification the Glasgow Municipal Airport has in regard to the volume and type of its traffic was the focus of a discussion that took at least 90 minutes Monday at a meeting of the airport’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There are 19 Republicans seriously considering launching campaigns for president, and 10 numbers on a phone. That causes a big problem for pollsters using automated polling technology, one of the most common forms of public polling. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Police officers in the Fifth Division will begin wearing body cameras in June. [WFPL]

A former chief justice from Georgia decried capital punishment Tuesday, dubbing it “morally indefensible” and void of business sense. [Think Progress]

Kentucky’s highest court says a fraternity house should be considered a private residence in a search-and-seizure case stemming from a college student’s drug conviction after police found marijuana in his room. [WKYT]

The global pharmaceutical industry is being called on to pay for a $2bn innovation fund to revitalise research into antibiotics. [BBC]

Federal prosecutors are opposing former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship’s request to go home to Las Vegas for Memorial Day. [H-L]

Asking the Department of Defense to consider allowing young undocumented immigrants to enlist proved a bridge too far Thursday in the Republican-led House of Representatives. [HuffPo]

Jamie Comer Still Clinging To Life

The four Republican candidates for governor bad-mouthed one another in the early minutes of Monday night’s debate, then tried to move past the controversy that has enveloped the race for the past two weeks. What planet is Matt Bevin on? The race has been nasty for a year. [H-L]

Doctors performing late-term abortions would be required to take steps to give the fetus the best chance of survival, according to a Republican bill the House plans to debate this week. [HuffPo]

Terry Stephens, the Russell Springs businessman who spent $5 million on an unsuccessful independent campaign to elect Republican David Williams governor in 2011, has contributed another $100,000 to an independent effort to help James Comer win Tuesday’s Republican primary for governor. [C-J/AKN]

Wall Street is worried that Sen. Bernie Sanders’s vigorous calls for banking industry reform will pull Hillary Clinton to the left, as the two presidential candidates battle for the 2016 Democratic nomination. [The Hill]

Bon Secours Kentucky Health System CEO Kevin Halter has been elected and installed as chairman of the Kentucky Hospital Association’s board of Trustees for the association’s 2015-16 year. [Ashland Independent]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

After resuming its open meeting on Monday night following a closed session to discuss the future acquisition or sale of real property, Cave City Mayor Dwayne Hatcher asked the city council for permission to proceed with negotiations with “industrial work” up to $40,000. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Researchers in the US have revealed a secret of the success of invasive fire ants – they can excavate any type of soil. Three-dimensional scanning revealed that the insects were able to build their complex nests regardless of the size of grains they needed to move. [BBC]

Community Farm Alliance and the Eastern Kentucky Food Systems Collaborative are accepting submissions for a local food guide to highlight eastern Kentucky restaurants, farmers markets, CSA’s (Community Supported Agriculture), and agri-tourism events. Owners and patrons are invited to submit their local food business to the guide via an online survey. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The House Appropriations Committee found itself at ground zero in the budget wars Wednesday, as Republicans proposed new cuts from legal services for the poor even as outside events forced more second guessing about reductions in transportation and housing programs. [Politico]

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has announced an award of nearly $7.5 million in National Emergency Grant funds to the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program, Inc. (EKCEP) to provide training and employment services to help out-of-work Eastern Kentuckians affected by the region’s economic struggles retrain and return to the workforce. [Hazard Herald]

Cesar Vargas has a resume most young Americans would envy. He graduated from a Brooklyn high school that counts Sens. Chuck Schumer and Bernie Sanders among its alumni. He made honors in both college and law school. But because he was brought to the United States from Mexico illegally when he was 5 years old, he can’t fulfill one of his dreams: joining the armed forces. [NPR]

Jim Ratliff is a glimmer of what could be possible to diversify jobs in Eastern Kentucky, a region hurt by a sharp downturn in the coal industry that long underpinned the economy. [H-L]

The Obama administration on Monday granted conditional approval to Shell to begin exploratory drilling in the Arctic, which the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management said would be “subject to rigorous safety standards.” [HuffPo]

Hal Heiner Is Absolutely A Politician

University of Kentucky police reported 12 sexual assaults on campus in the 2013-14 school year. The University of Louisville and Western Kentucky University each reported one. [H-L]

Scientists are balking at major cuts to NASA’s budget that the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology approved last week, cuts that critics say will imperil climate change research in the U.S. [HuffPo]

Hal Heiner may be a Frankfort outsider but he is certainly a politician and certainly has had a large network in place for the past six years. [C-J/AKN]

Insurance firms, already among Washington’s biggest donors, are securing powerful allies in Congress as the Federal Reserve draws up nationwide capital rules for the $1 trillion industry after years of delay. [Reuters]

We love a good conclussion, don’t you? Conclussion, conclussion, conclussion. APD’s quick work led to mugging conclussion. [Ashland Independent]

After Edward Snowden, the government said its controversial surveillance programs had stopped a terrorist – David Coleman Headley. In “American Terrorist,” ProPublica and PBS “Frontline” show why the claim is largely untrue. [ProPublica]

City of Berea revenues continue to grow, and the city budget has $5 million set aside in a “rainy day” fund. [Richmond Register]

A North Carolina county prosecutor won’t certify visa applications for Latino domestic violence victims if their assailants are also Latino. [Think Progress]

The employment of an emergency medical technician who was involved in an alleged road rage incident last month has been terminated, according to his boss. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Underwater explorers in Madagascar say they have found what is thought to be the treasure of notorious Scottish pirate William Kidd. Soldiers on Sainte Marie island have been guarding the 50kg silver bar after divers brought it to shore. [BBC]

The University of Louisville will not renew it’s contract with clothing maker JanSport. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

The Fayette County Public Schools board voted Saturday to partner with McNamara Search Associates of Lexington to vet 30 superintendent candidates. [H-L]

These absurd lawsuits show why the anti-gay movement is failing. [HuffPo]

Is Bullitt County Worse Than Laurel?

A hearing has been scheduled for June 8 to determine whether a former Pulaski County preacher is competent to stand trial in the September 2013 shooting deaths of three people at a Danville pawn shop. [H-L]

Immigration hard-liners in the House made it clear Tuesday that they’re willing to put up a fight over even the smallest measures friendly to undocumented immigrants. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin, pounded by Sen. Mitch McConnell a year ago in a U.S. Senate primary, has turned his attention from a quixotic quest to topple one of the nation’s most powerful Republicans to the race for Kentucky’s governor. [C-J/AKN]

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds. High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. [NPR]

In a special meeting last Thursday night, Rowan Fiscal Court approved first reading of an ordinance for the issuance of $15 million in notes and bonds to begin the new Rowan County Detention Center project. [The Morehead News]

The FBI for the first time acknowledges the investigation of the 1992 killing of five American nuns in Liberia is again part of an active case. [ProPublica]

Kentucky State Police are now investigating the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.Shelter employee Delsie Williams says Kentucky State Police came to her Mt. Washington home on Monday afternoon with a search warrant. She says they took her cell phone, hard drive, laptops, desktop computers and other items. Her attorney tells WDRB he’s still trying to figure out the reason. [WDRB]

The man who was walking with Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, last summer when a police officer shot the unarmed 18-year-old is suing the city, the former police chief and a former officer, according to state records. [Newsweek]

A bill that environmental groups say would damage the Clean Air Act is advancing through the House of Representatives. The bipartisan bill is spearheaded by Kentucky Congressman Ed Whitfield. [WFPL]

The nightmare began just after sundown. At a dimly lit intersection in Iguala, police with automatic weapons surrounded three buses loaded with college students. The police opened fire. Screaming that they were unarmed, the students fled down darkened alleys, pounding on doors, desperate for shelter. Gunmen put the city on lockdown, stalking the streets in a drizzling rain. [The Intercept]

James Comer directly accused Hal Heiner’s campaign Wednesday of involvement in spreading rumors alleging Comer abused a girlfriend in college, while a third candidate in the Republican primary for governor, Matt Bevin, implied Heiner had prior knowledge of some of the allegations. [Ronnie Ellis]

Legislation that would dramatically expand the powers of Canada’s spy agency has cleared a key hurdle. [BBC]

Kentucky has taken steps to prohibit electioneering on public property within 100 feet of polling places for the May 19 primary election. [H-L]

At least 38 million people worldwide have been forced from their homes by violence or armed conflict, a new report on internally displaced persons has found. Of that number, 11 million were displaced in 2014 alone, spurred by ongoing violence in Syria, South Sudan and Iraq. [HuffPo]