Bevin Drags KY Health Into Dark Ages

As Gov. Matt Bevin prepares to remake Kentucky’s Medicaid program, a new national survey shows what’s at stake: gains in insurance coverage matched only by one other state. [H-L]

American schools are hotbeds for racial discrimination, according to a preliminary report from a group of United Nations experts. [HuffPo]

Former U.S. Sen. Marlow W. Cook, a leader of the Republican renaissance in Louisville and Jefferson County during the 1960s, has died. [C-J/AKN]

Every day in America more than 50 people die from an overdose of prescription pain medication. Some people who start out abusing pain pills later turn to heroin, which claims another 29 lives each day. [NPR]

These are the candidates who have filled for city commissioner in Hazard. [Hazard Herald]

Presidential candidate Donald Trump has called for a new election in Iowa, accusing the Republican winner, Ted Cruz, of fraud. [BBC]

Jim Ramsey knows his days at the University of Louisville are numbered. [Business First]

In the lead-up to Donald Trump’s loss in Iowa, staffers sought additional funding for campaign infrastructure and were denied. [Politico]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Creation Museum wants Boone County’s blessing for an expansion. Leaders of the museum’ dedicated to a literal interpretation of the Bible wants to nearly triple its exhibit space over the next three years. [Cincinnasti.com]

The U.S. Justice Department is considering legal changes to combat what it sees as a rising threat from domestic anti-government extremists, senior officials told Reuters, even as it steps up efforts to stop Islamic State-inspired attacks at home. [Reuters]

What does 100 days of school mean to White Hall Elementary School second grade students? That in 74 more days, they will be third graders, said teacher Susan Huntzinger. [Richmond Register]

The Des Moines Register is calling for a “complete audit” of the Iowa Democratic caucuses in light of concerns by Bernie Sanders about the razor-thin margin. [The Hill]

A proposal in Congress would provide $1 billion for mine reclamation projects in Eastern Kentucky and other areas grappling with a sharp downturn in coal jobs. [H-L]

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) slammed President Barack Obama’s visit to a mosque on Wednesday, during which the president denounced anti-Muslim rhetoric, for “pitting people against each other.” [HuffPo]

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Fun (Terrifying) Republican Name Association

For several years I’ve seen thousands of Hal Rogers-related headlines. That shouldn’t be out of the ordinary for a politician.

But let’s get real for a minute. Nearly every Hal Rogers headline is creepy as hell. Not usually because of what he’s done (or hasn’t done) in Washington but because of what his name’s attached to: the Mountain Parkway.

A couple of the latest headlines:

  • Coroner called to crash on Hal Rogers Parkway (WKYT)
  • Fatal Accident Shuts Down Hal Rogers Parkway (WLEX18)

Always something dark and death-filled.

Now his name’s popping up like crazy because he’s trying to build a $400+ million federal prison in Letcher County. So it’s all, “Hal Rogers Blah Blah Federal Prison” all day long.

Constantly a bunch of tragic death or crime with “Hal Rogers” in the headline.

Is that some sort of macabre Republican strategy?

Surely can’t be good for politics.

Film Tax Credit Should Be Expanded

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Nonprofit co-ops, the health care law’s public-spirited alternative to mega-insurers, are awash in red ink and many have fallen short of sign-up goals, a government audit has found. [H-L]

Few aspects of policing attract more scrutiny than an officer’s use of force. And as people around the nation continue to voice concerns about the sometimes contentious relationship between citizens and law enforcement, it’s become clear that police and the policed often have drastically different interpretations of the same incidents. [HuffPo]

Every year, the politicians trot out their best one liners at the Fancy Farm Picnic, where they are more likely to mock their opponents for past flubs than they are to talk about serious policy matters. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is staking his run for U.S. president in part on a vow to protect American jobs. But this month, one of his companies, the elite Mar-a-Lago Club resort in Florida, applied to import 70 foreign workers to serve as cooks, wait staff and cleaners. A Reuters analysis of U.S. government data reveals that this is business as usual in the New York property magnate’s empire. [Reuters]

Native walleye have returned to the Kentucky River after a decades-long absence. Fisheries employees with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources stocked more than 25,000 native southern strain walleye in the three forks of the Kentucky River above Lock and Dam 14 near Beattyville. The walleye, measuring 2-3 inches, went into the river last month. [Richmond Register]

Juan Emmanuel Razo, an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, was arrested last week on murder charges for allegedly shooting and wounding a woman in Ohio. [ThinkProgress]

Hollywood is spending its money in the Bluegrass and the Oldham County city of La Grange is already feeling the impact of a new investment in the film industry recently passed by Kentucky lawmakers. [WAVE3]

Republicans might as well face it. They’re addicted to Trump. [Politico]

Adam Edelen, current Kentucky Auditor who’s running for re-election, on Saturday faced off against Republican opponent Mike Harmon, who said Edelen’s low name recognition throughout the state could be damaging in this race, and perhaps beyond. [Ashland Independent]

The first debate of the 2016 presidential campaign season is Thursday, Aug. 6. With so many Republican candidates trying to get on stage, what should voters be looking for? [NPR]

Matt Jones, the popular host of a radio sports talk show, stepped on some powerful toes Saturday while playing the part of Fancy Farm political speaking emcee in a non-traditional way. [Ronnie Ellis]

President Barack Obama just finalized his plan to fight climate change. The EPA’s new rules will crack down on emissions from coal-fired power plants. [Mother Jones]

Just what Eastern Kentucky needs. Another prison. Hal Rogers says an environmental impact study has suggested a site in Letcher County for a new federal prison. [H-L]

The union representing a white police officer charged with murdering a black man during a traffic stop wants to help him get his job back. [HuffPo]

State Media Ignoring Glasgow Messes

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

New research indicates that Washington, D.C., is rapidly sinking into the ocean, news that might not make the rest of the country all that sad. [HuffPo]

Unless you’re traveling through Woodford County because Woodford County is the traffic devil. Kentucky speeders get off easier than drivers in other states, according to a 2015 WalletHub study that ranked the “Strictest and Most Lenient States on Speeding and Reckless Driving.” [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s explosive rise in the polls has come at the expense of every other GOP presidential candidate except for Jeb Bush and Scott Walker — who arguably have been helped by the businessman’s rise. [The Hill]

There weren’t many substantive insights drawn from Monday’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway before a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Business Summit crowd. [Ronnie Ellis]

Opponents of President Barack Obama’s soon-to-be-implemented policy to cut carbon emissions from power plants are planning to use an unlikely and potentially potent weapon against him: the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that saved Obamacare. [Reuters]

A hearing has been set for next week regarding whether to take a former police chief’s lawsuit against the City of Glasgow and the current, interim chief outside Barren County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Despite his plum position, Rogers finds himself at odds with GOP leadership on a path to stave off a government shutdown. [Politico]

The latest column Greg Stumbo’s LRC staffers have written for him is about drug abuse. [Floyd County Times]

The Eagle was built by the Nazis and fought for Hitler in World War Two – so how did a tall ship that once flew the swastika end up as a training vessel for new US Coast Guard cadets? [BBC]

The first extension of Mountain Parkway in a half-century is set to begin next year with the reconstruction of a wider, safer Restaurant Row in Salyersville. While visible road work is underway to the west, teams are busy finalizing construction plans, land acquisitions and utility relocation efforts to prepare for a summer start. [WTVQ]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Lexington gets a lot of things right. The University of Kentucky opened a new bike path Wednesday at the Arboretum to connect bicyclists from south Lexington neighborhoods to campus and downtown. [H-L]

It was 50 years ago Thursday that President Lyndon Johnson signed the legislation that created Medicare, dramatically altering life for America’s seniors. But as debate over the program rages on, its conservative critics have learned to be more crafty about what alternatives they propose — and how to justify them. [HuffPo]

A Gun Nut Extremist Fears The Gays

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

State audits of companies that provide Medicaid-funded homes and services for adults with disabilities are sending shock waves through the businesses, which say the state is demanding repayment of millions of dollars for what amounts to minor paperwork errors. [C-J/AKN]

The Des Moines Register editorial board is blasting businessman Donald Trump, saying he should drop out of the 2016 Republican presidential race. [The Hill & DMR]

Hal Rogers, a staunch supporter of Kentucky’s coal industry, said last week that the state must consider other manners of employment for the Appalachian region besides coal. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

Steve Beshear is placing $82.5 million of surplus funds into the state’s reserve fund, bringing the “rainy day” fund to $209.4 million, the highest amount in almost a decade. [Business First]

Less than 15 percent of U.S. adults eat enough fruits daily to meet federal recommendations, but the numbers are even worse in some states, dipping as low as 7.5 percent in Tennessee, according to a new study. [Reuters]

The state Energy and Environment Cabinet will take comments about oil and gas development from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday in a “listening session” at the Center for Rural Development in Somerset. [Richmond Register]

Meagan Taylor, a 22-year-old transgender woman of color, has been sitting in an isolated Iowa jail since last Monday simply because she was profiled for her identity. [ThinkProgress]

Truckloads of cleaning supplies, food, water and other provisions are continuing to be distributed to Johnson Countians whose lives were devastated by recent flash flooding and other weather-related problems. [Ashland Independent]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

After much criticism and refusing to utter Bevin’s name, Mitch McConnell is stepping slightly forward. Then he’ll very quickly step back into the shadows, allowing Bevin to dig his own political grave. [H-L]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday listed Americans held in Iraq by name and said the United States will not give up until they are returned. [HuffPo]