A Gun Nut Extremist Fears The Gays

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

State audits of companies that provide Medicaid-funded homes and services for adults with disabilities are sending shock waves through the businesses, which say the state is demanding repayment of millions of dollars for what amounts to minor paperwork errors. [C-J/AKN]

The Des Moines Register editorial board is blasting businessman Donald Trump, saying he should drop out of the 2016 Republican presidential race. [The Hill & DMR]

Hal Rogers, a staunch supporter of Kentucky’s coal industry, said last week that the state must consider other manners of employment for the Appalachian region besides coal. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

Steve Beshear is placing $82.5 million of surplus funds into the state’s reserve fund, bringing the “rainy day” fund to $209.4 million, the highest amount in almost a decade. [Business First]

Less than 15 percent of U.S. adults eat enough fruits daily to meet federal recommendations, but the numbers are even worse in some states, dipping as low as 7.5 percent in Tennessee, according to a new study. [Reuters]

The state Energy and Environment Cabinet will take comments about oil and gas development from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday in a “listening session” at the Center for Rural Development in Somerset. [Richmond Register]

Meagan Taylor, a 22-year-old transgender woman of color, has been sitting in an isolated Iowa jail since last Monday simply because she was profiled for her identity. [ThinkProgress]

Truckloads of cleaning supplies, food, water and other provisions are continuing to be distributed to Johnson Countians whose lives were devastated by recent flash flooding and other weather-related problems. [Ashland Independent]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

After much criticism and refusing to utter Bevin’s name, Mitch McConnell is stepping slightly forward. Then he’ll very quickly step back into the shadows, allowing Bevin to dig his own political grave. [H-L]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday listed Americans held in Iraq by name and said the United States will not give up until they are returned. [HuffPo]

Hal Rogers Shows His True Colors

The federal government has moved to suspend disability payments to some people in Eastern Kentucky whose cases were handled by Floyd County attorney Eric C. Conn, citing suspected fraud by Conn and doctors that his clients often consulted. [H-L]

A $62,500 settlement has been reached in a lawsuit that alleged the sheriff in Jackson County falsely arrested the judge-executive last year. The settlement deal was reached Thursday following a mediation session, said Ned Pillersdorf, a Prestonsburg attorney who represents former Jackson County Judge-Executive William O. Smith. [More H-L]

Ireland has voted resoundingly to legalize gay marriage in the world’s first national vote on the issue, leaders on both sides of the Irish referendum declared Saturday even as official ballot counting continued. [HuffPo]

The attorney for the alleged ringleader of a bourbon theft and steroid trafficking ring questioned Friday whether her client Gilbert “Toby” Curtsinger can get a fair trial with the attention the case is getting. Something tells us this story is going to get crazier by the minute all summer long. [C-J/AKN]

A U.S. federal appeals court on Friday ruled that tobacco companies cannot be forced to announce publicly that they deliberately deceived the public over the health risks of cigarettes. [Reuters]

The Glasgow Management Control Board has decided it is not the appropriate authority to determine whether the 911 dispatch center should allow a radio channel to be added for the exclusive use of one volunteer fire department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Distillery Innovation and Excise Tax Reform Act unveiled Tuesday would drop the current tax rate for distilled spirits from $13.50 per proof gallon to $2.70 per proof gallon on the first 10,000 gallons of productions for all distillers and then $9 per proof gallon after that. [The Hill]

Rowan County Fiscal Court Tuesday had first reading of its 2015-16 fiscal year budget which includes a cost of living pay increase for county employees. [The Morehead News]

Senate Republican leaders managed to scrape up enough votes just past midnight Saturday morning to put off decisive action on the NSA’s bulk collection of American phone records until next Sunday, May 31. But the hardliners — and make no mistake, they are taking an even harder and more absurd line than the NSA itself — have no endgame. [The Intercept]

Jack Conway’s brother has pleaded guilty to misdemeanor disorderly conduct in a case that stemmed from an allegation he hit a woman in the face following a Christmas party in 2013. [WDRB]

Five of the world’s largest banks are to pay fines totalling $5.7bn (£3.6bn) for charges including manipulating the foreign exchange market. Four of the banks – JPMorgan, Barclays, Citigroup and RBS – have agreed to plead guilty to US criminal charges. [BBC]

In a seven count indictment Perry County Clerk Haven King faces charges for an April incident. The victim Kalie Bentley claims King followed her down the road and confronted her while she was in the car. In a video posted on Facebook by Bentley she identifies King. It shows the man questioning her about driving a car with a handicap license plate. [WYMT]

Many public high schools lack funding for STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering and Math — programs. Energy companies worried about finding future employees are donating to schools. [NPR]

Of course Hal Rogers opposes needle exchanges. Until his family members figure out how to profit from them, they won’t get his support. [H-L]

Rand Paul’s dumb ass wanted to give the executive branch of government even more power. [HuffPo]

Another Corrupt Judge Gets Revealed

Rand Paul has hinged his fledgling presidential campaign on polls showing him ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in some swing states, but the latest Bluegrass Poll suggests Paul might have a hard time beating Clinton in his own backyard. [H-L]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. [More H-L]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Kingdom amusement park could receive up to $3.75 million in tax-recovery incentives to be spread over the next decade. [C-J/AKN]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Citing concerns for public safety and the environment, the Madison County Fiscal Court unanimously adopted a resolution expressing opposition to the proposed conversion of gas pipeline. [Richmond Register]

The Oklahoma attorney general’s office misrepresented the facts behind a key argument about the availability of certain execution drugs in its filings at the U.S. Supreme Court, BuzzFeed News has determined. [BuzzFart]

Glad to see Riggs Lewis is shopping around the information we uncovered. Yet more proof that the Comer crew is using the Marilyn Thomas incident politically. They’ve had that information about Michael Adams’ ties to Jeff Hoover since early 2014. [Ashland Independent]

A coalition of conservative groups want to make sure Congressional Republicans don’t let up on the fight to eliminate what they call D.C.’s exemption from ObamaCare. [The Hill]

A total of $300,000 is the amount the Rowan County Board of Education had to find last year to balance the budget and this year the district faces the same fiscal shortfall. [The Morehead News]

Republican Jeb Bush said on Tuesday that “mistakes were made” in the Iraq war, moving to disavow a controversial statement he made in support of the 2003 invasion ordered by his brother, then-President George W. Bush. [Reuters]

Multiple coroners in Kentucky have gone years without meeting the training standards that are set forth in Kentucky law. [WKYT]

The heart of the batting order is due up in the House Appropriations Committee beginning Wednesday: four major spending bills that will capture all the contradictions in the new Republican budget over the next month. [Politico]

The only people standing behind Jamie Comer are people like Anne “KT’s Old Fashioned” Northup, Dan “FEAR THE GAYS and Let My Daughter Illegally Run For Office” Seum, Julie “Let Me Pad My Pension” Denton and similar shysters. [H-L]

House Republicans are again attacking measures aimed at protecting U.S. troops from predatory lending practices, two weeks after a similar GOP effort failed. [HuffPo]

Jim Gray Doles Out The Big Bucks

The President today declared a major disaster exists in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and ordered federal aid to supplement commonwealth and local recovery efforts in the area affected by the severe winter storms, snowstorms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides during the period of February 15-22, 2015. [Press Release]

Four members of Lexington Mayor Jim Gray’s staff have received hefty salary increases during the past year, salary data show. [H-L]

Think about this: more than 4 in 10 people in the United States live in counties that have unhealthy levels of either ozone or particle pollution. [HuffPo]

Here is some reaction from officials and friends on the passing of federal Judge John Heyburn. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, launched a long-shot bid for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday, a move likely to pressure Hillary Clinton from the left on issues from income inequality to corporate governance. [Reuters]

Considering he is a Kentucky icon and Greenup County native, the author of scores of books and subject of many a scholarly article, the late Jesse Stuart is not as well understood as most people might think. [Ashland Independent]

With Baltimore’s troubles as a backdrop, House Republicans are proposing new cuts from urban programs this week even as their budget would add tens of billions of dollars for the Pentagon to get around strict spending caps. [Politico]

This is the big news in Morehead: a funeral home is changing its name. [The Morehead News]

The American Psychological Association secretly collaborated with the administration of President George W. Bush to bolster a legal and ethical justification for the torture of prisoners swept up in the post-Sept. 11 war on terror, according to a new report by a group of dissident health professionals and human rights activists. [NY Times]

The post-position draw happened at Churchill Downs on April 29. The Kentucky Derby will happen on May 2. [WHAS11]

Wall Street closed sharply lower on Thursday as weak results from several companies hit investor sentiment. Wednesday’s disappointing GDP figures also contributed to the sharp falls in the US. [BBC]

During any other week twenty flights would make a busy day for Atlantic Aviation. However, the Thursday through Saturday of Derby week redefines wingtip-to wingtip. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama’s library will be built in Chicago, NBC News confirmed Thursday. [NBC Chicago]

We can’t stop laughing about this. A DARE officer for the Frankfort Police Department who allegedly was involved in a transaction for anabolic steroids with a central figure in the recent high-profile bourbon thefts has resigned, a department spokesman said Wednesday. [H-L]

The federal money pot that pays for roads, bridges and mass transit expires in one month, and lawmakers are struggling to build support for legislation that would extend it. [HuffPo]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Yep, Hal Heiner’s The Front-Runner

Talking for the first time Tuesday with the redistricting committee about its proposed new attendance boundaries, Fayette County school board members asked questions about the most controversial recommendations. [H-L]

New rules limiting smog may be “controversial,” but they are among the administration’s top priorities, according to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy. [HuffPo]

Told ya bigot Hal Heiner was the Republican front-runner. He’s being attacked up one side and down the other. [C-J/AKN]

Oklahoma geologists have documented strong links between increased seismic activity in the state and the injection into the ground of wastewater from oil and gas production, a state agency said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Industrial Development Economic Authority of Glasgow-Barren County board members reviewed several items as they close their fiscal year. They approved – pending approval from the state – granting $50,000 to the city of Glasgow and Barren County for upgrades at a pair of facilities where a Babe Ruth League softball competition will be played in July. [Glasgow Daily Times]

After Edward Snowden, the government said its controversial surveillance programs had stopped a terrorist – David Coleman Headley. In “American Terrorist,” ProPublica and PBS “Frontline” show why the claim is largely untrue. [ProPublica]

Morehead is slowly turning into Bath Salts Central. [The Morehead News]

The House Appropriations Committee adopted a spending blueprint Wednesday which demands deep cuts from President Barack Obama’s domestic budget but keeps alive the hope that the panel can still move its bills through Congress this summer while the two political parties look for some compromise. [Politico]

Prices of retail food items in Kentucky fell during the last quarter, the first time since June 2013, in a survey of grocery costs. [WFPL]

A report by Amnesty International and Global Witness has alleged that nearly 80% of US firms are failing to adequately check their supply chains for conflict minerals. [BBC]

The judge who sentenced former Atlanta Public Schools educators to prison time in a cheating scandal, has scheduled a modification of sentence hearing for three defendants who received the stiffest sentences. [WHAS11]

The parents of Michael Brown, the unarmed man whom a Ferguson, Mo., police officer shot and killed last August, have filed a civil lawsuit against the city, along with former police chief Thomas Jackson and Darren Wilson, the officer who shot Brown, 18. [NPR]

A reward for information in the slayings for a Central Kentucky mother and daughter has been increased to $50,000, the victims’ family said. [H-L]

Thousands of families of critically ill children and advocates for marijuana reform launched a national campaign Wednesday supporting the legalization of certain strains of cannabis oil that have shown therapeutic benefits. [HuffPo]

Hal Rogers Got Into A Big Slapfight

Lexington’s longtime garbage contractor is challenging the city’s decision to award a five-year pact that could be worth up to $17 million to a new contractor with a landfill in Scott County. [H-L]

Americans are being spied on, but does anyone care? [HuffPo]

Fifth-generation Brown family member Campbell Brown will be the new president of the Old Forester brand beginning May 1, the first family member to have that job since company founder George Garvin Brown. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. returned dozens of artifacts to the Iraqi government Monday. The cultural treasures, some dating back more than 4,000 years, were looted from Iraq and smuggled into the United States. [NPR]

Morehead State University will break ground Thursday on three projects with an estimated total cost of $48.3 million. [The Morehead News]

Liberals are pressing for Hillary Clinton to disavow Obama policies. [The Hill]

Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin was no stranger to Mary Wood Weldon Memorial Library or to the Barren County Patriots Association. [Glasgow Daily Times]

VICE founder Shane Smith interviews President Barack Obama, discussing a host of issues important to Americans, from foreign policy and marijuana legalization to global warming and political gridlock. [VICE]

With challenges including an aggressive Environmental Protection Agency’s policies toward coal-fired electrical plants, Kentucky Power President and Chief Operating Officer Greg Pauley told members of the Ashland Rotary Club every decision the company makes is determined by how it will affect both industrial and residential customers. [Ashland Independent]

Although bankruptcy should only be viewed as the last option for consumers drowning in a sea of debt, even this final-straw course of action won’t help Americans with getting out from under hefty student loans — but it wasn’t always this way. [Consumerist]

The St. Joseph Berea Foundation, part of KentuckyOne Health, has received a $20,000 grant from the Kentucky Breast Cancer Research and Education Trust Fund to provide mammograms for the uninsured through the foundation’s “Yes, Mamm!’ program. [Richmond Register]

“I don’t care about the office of inspector general. … You’re in charge,” said Republican Representative Hal Rogers, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. “We want to get to the bottom of it right away and I’m disappointed that you have not waged your own vigorous, tough investigation of this.” [Reuters]

University of Kentucky students from the Bluegrass State will pay 3 percent more for tuition and fees this fall, an increase that brings tuition to $10,780 a year for first-year students. [H-L]

Facing the prospect of imminent oversight by a newly created government regulator, the much-reviled payday loan industry’s lobbying machine surged into action. [HuffPo]