KDP’s Arms Flailing, Sinking, Lost Again

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Kentucky county clerk’s office should reissue altered marriage licenses even though the governor has promised to recognize them as valid. [H-L]

In the lead-up to Thursday’s House vote for tightening restrictions on Syrian refugees seeking entry into the United States, senior Democrats warned fellow members that they faced a massive backlash next fall if they didn’t support the bill. [HuffPo]

Dawn has barely broken, and Melanie Lowe is already in a hurry. She’s on her way to court. A familiar route, timed to the minute. Jericho Road to avoid the train. Burks Branch to skip the lights. She scarfs a protein bar and dials a colleague. No, she can’t cover for another public defender in juvenile court. Too many cases. [C-J/AKN]

Basically, Democrats don’t have a chance now that Matt Jones has realized it’d be dumb to run for congress. [Roll Call]

Guess he learned from weed in Ohio and maybe from the last dozen times he’s tried gambling bills. Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo pre-filed legislation that, if passed, would ensure that no business could acquire more than one horse-racing license except under special circumstances in Kentucky. [WMKY]

First-hand accounts like this won’t deter pandering bigots like Rand Paul and Matt Bevin. Until last year, I was one of 4.3 million people at the mercy of the legal immigration system, waiting for the chance to stay in the U.S. for good. [BuzzFeed]

Republican Gov.-elect Matt Bevin told a statewide gathering of county officials the crisis in state pension systems requires immediate attention and the solution will have to come from the general fund at the expense of other spending needs. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump tweeted a series of inaccurate murder statistics from the “Crime Statistics Bureau — San Francisco.” The bureau doesn’t exist and the statistics were fabricated. [ThinkProgress]

Steve Riley, one of two Republicans who have voiced their intent to be candidates for the 23rd District Kentucky House of Representatives seat, said he’s been interested in politics for a long time, but it wasn’t “the right thing” for him to be part of it before now. [Glasgow Daily Times]

When it comes to terrorism, more Americans trust Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton than the top Republican candidates in the field, according to the latest results of an ABC News/Washington Post survey released Monday. But among those who worry most about terrorism, Donald Trump is the preferred candidate. [Politico]

It took six tries but Rowan Fiscal Court on Tuesday finally passed a longevity pay scale for full-time county employees. [The Morehead News]

This Turtleman charade is certainly embarrassing for Kentucky. But it’s not as dumb as the handful of New Yorkers that constantly scream about it every chance they get in an attempt to shame Kentuckians in some bitter, vengeful rage. A Kentucky farmer has accused Animal Planet of setting a fire, damming a creek, chopping down trees, and illegally trespassing and building structures on his property during the production of the reality TV show Call of the Wildman. [Mother Jones]

Terrorist attacks like the one in Paris make me fear for America’s future. I don’t fear the terrorists so much as the reaction they prompt among America’s fearmongers and the people who listen to them. Their actions are capable of doing far more damage to this country than jihadists could ever accomplish. [Tom Eblen]

Weather-related disasters such as floods and heatwaves have occurred almost daily in the past decade, almost twice as often as two decades ago, with Asia being the hardest hit region, a U.N. report said on Monday. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Refugee Freakout Continues For Racists

Gov. Steve Beshear launched a program Monday to help Kentuckians move from a life of drug abuse and addiction to one of sobriety and productivity. [H-L]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Just what Kentucky’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Five ways conservative media are exploiting the terrorist attacks in Paris to hype misinformation. [MMFA]

Here’s the latest column Greg Stumbo’s LRC staffers have written for him. In the late 1990s, Gov. Paul Patton rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.” [Floyd County Times]

Refugees aren’t just slipping into the US. Screening takes two years, and it’s nearly impossible for people to pass. [Vox]

The situation is under investigation by the state department of corrections but the jailer says what happened is just another sign of how bad the drug situation is. [WKYT]

Confusing refugees with terrorists is morally unacceptable and, as a matter of strategy, misguided. [NY Times]

Copper thieves are responsible for a power outage that affected nearly 1,500 Kentucky Power customers in Pikeville Monday night, including the local hospital. [Hazard Herald]

Australia’s Carmichael coal mine project has been under major scrutiny by large conservation groups and prominent Australians for months. Now, progressive think tank the Australia Institute has found just how damaging the emissions from burning coal at the mine could really be. [ThinkProgress]

The Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts Adam Edelen released the 2014 audit of the former Harlan County Sheriff Marvin Lipfird’s office on Friday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Fields along the Mississippi River Delta once gleamed white in the autumn with acre upon acre of cotton ready to be picked. But to see the decline of a cash crop once nicknamed “King Cotton” one need look no further than the 300 acres (121 hectares) that Michael Shelton farms in Clarksdale, Mississippi, about 75 miles (120 km) down river from Memphis. [Reuters]

A new mobile activity center that will educate students about agriculture will be on the road to eastern Kentucky after the first of the year. [H-L]

Astronomers have spotted what they believe is the most distant object in the solar system — a dwarf planet floating some 9.5 billion miles from the sun. [HuffPo]

Some Monday Evening Gloom And Doom

The most important newspaper in the state has ignored scandal after scandal in Montgomery County, just 20 minutes away from its offices, but has focused non-stop on stupid issues like this. In places hours and hours away. Really, freaking out about a student prank involving bible verses? Really, it’s Nancy Rodriguez all over again. Maybe worse this time. [H-L]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) new book sold fewer than 500 copies in two weeks. TWO WEEKS! Can you imagine? More people wanted Jake’s Kim Davis magnets on Twitter than bought the little man’s new book. [HuffPo]

House Democrats met Friday to talk about moving forward following Tuesday’s devastating losses in statewide elections and to steel themselves against the possibility that some of their members may switch parties or take jobs in the Bevin administration, jeopardizing their party’s hold on the chamber. [C-J/AKN]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Matt London took some time off Thursday from his day job to harvest soybeans on a seven-acre plot near Hiseville-Bear Wallow Road. He, like other grain farmers in the area, is a little later in the year harvesting because of weather, which is the consistent seasonal variable in agriculture. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) says that when it comes to foreign policy, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), a fellow GOP presidential candidate, and Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton are “the same person.” [The Hill]

It’s not every day the richest man in the world visits eastern Kentucky. Bill Gates and his wife Melinda were spotted eating at Texas Roadhouse in Pikeville and snapped cell phone photos of Gates enjoying his meal went viral. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. and coalition forces are likely to increase air strikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria in coming weeks after a lull in September and October, the head of U.S. Air Forces Central Command said Saturday. [Reuters]

Dr. Scott Davison, a professor and department chair at Morehead State University, Tuesday won the three remaining years on the vacant seat on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

The journalists were assassinated on American soil, one after another. Duong Trong Lam was the first. He was 27 years old and ran a Vietnamese-language publication called Cai Dinh Lang, which he mailed to immigrants around the country. A gunman found him as he walked out of his San Francisco apartment building one morning and shot him, a single bullet piercing his pulmonary artery, just above the heart. [ProPublica]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

The State Department has released a new chronology adding perspective to how the diplomatic agency, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and other elements of the U.S. government scrambled to respond to the attack on the U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, on September 11, 2012. [Politico]

Handguns, narcotics and $30,000 in cash were stolen during a break-in of the Simpsonville Police Department, Kentucky State Police said in a release. [H-L]

Surprise! There are a bunch of Kentuckians on this list. The hackivist collective Anonymous released a much-anticipated list of people it claims are members or supporters of the Ku Klux Klan on Thursday night. [HuffPo]

Everybody’s Freaking Out Over Matt Bevin

Kentucky Mist Moonshine filed suit Monday in U.S. District Court against the University of Kentucky in a federal trademark-registration case that has garnered national attention. [H-L]

House Republicans are pushing to give private debt collectors the right to target all unpaid tax bills, handing a traditional IRS responsibility over to an industry with a long record of consumer abuse. [HuffPo]

Four Kentucky hospitals are among 457 in 43 states that have agreed to pay the government more than $250 million to settle allegations that they implanted cardiac devices in patients in violation of Medicare rules. [C-J/AKN]

Congress intends to slash funds for the Obama administration’s counterterrorism partnership fund next year to reduce defense spending to a level negotiated last week between the White House and congressional leadership. [The Hill]

A candidate who barely made it out of the primary ended up leading Kentucky Republicans to one of their most successful election days in recent history. [WFPL]

Democratic U.S. senators on Monday urged the Obama administration to reform the federal coal mine program to include costs of the fuel’s carbon emissions and potentially raise royalties paid by companies that mine the fuel on public lands. [Reuters]

Really, Montgomery County? Hunting equipment required you to call in outside law enforcement? Guess it’s good that you didn’t call in SWAT teams or anything. [WKYT]

Despite lacking access to key documents and personnel, the inspector general determined that nearly $43 million had been spent on a natural gas station that should have cost closer to $300,000. [ProPublica]

Oh man, Greg Stumbo had his LRC staffers write about traffic fatalities. It’s almost like he’s forgotten that time he was pulled over during a suspected DUI stop, hopped over into the passenger seat and claimed someone else was driving his vehicle. [Floyd County Times]

The Vatican faced fresh accusations of mismanagement, excess and resistance to change as details from two new books emerged Tuesday, a day after the Holy See announced the arrest of two insiders on suspicion of leaking internal information. [WaPo]

Kroger presented a check in the amount of $27,360 to the Bowling Green/ Warren County Humane Society. [WBKO]

The UN says the current climate plans from 146 countries represent a significant advance – but will not be enough to prevent dangerous warming. [BBC]

Two former deputy jailers have been indicted on federal charges in the 2013 death of an inmate at the Kentucky River Regional Jail in Hazard. [H-L]

One consequence of Bevin’s victory is that about 400,000 Kentucky residents who qualify for Medicaid under the expansion are now at risk of losing their health insurance. [HuffPo]

Most Credible Paper In State Ignoring Scandal

Still ignoring the corruption in Montgomery County, it seems. Continuing to address problems that state Auditor Adam Edelen found in 2014, officials with Fayette County Public Schools said Monday that by early 2016 they expect a hot line could be operating for anonymous reports of waste, fraud, abuse and noncompliance. [H-L]

The White House on Monday slammed FBI Director James Comey’s notion that pervasive cellphone footage featuring police actions has led to an uptick in violent crime. [HuffPo]

Now that he’s got a monstrous retirement, of course. Dave Armstrong, former mayor of Louisville and two-term Jefferson County judge-executive, has retired after serving seven years as chairman of the Kentucky Public Service Commission. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon is considering allowing U.S. troops to embed with Iraqi forces. [The Hill]

Really, Paducah, this is what you’ve got time for? Arresting a mother and son for growing two marijuana plants? [WAVE3]

Republican Jeb Bush’s struggling presidential campaign is cutting salaries across the board and reducing staff in a money-saving effort intended to concentrate resources on early voting states, an internal memo said on Friday. It doesn’t help that Jeb Bush is the most boring man on earth. [Reuters]

Oh, now Greg Stumbo cares about human trafficking. Here’s the latest that his Legislative Research Commission staffers have written for him in the hometown paper. [Floyd County Times]

For the first time in a national poll, Ben Carson has overtaken Donald Trump, leading the Manhattan businessman in the CBS News/New York Times survey of Republican primary voters out Tuesday. [Politico]

As Kentucky’s political class tries to divine what’s likely to happen in one of the more unpredictable governor’s races on record, a new publicly released poll shows Democrat Jack Conway with the same persistent five-point lead he’s managed in other polls. [Ronnie Ellis]

In 2002, Texas Supreme Court Justice Xavier Rodriguez, a Republican, lost his seat on the bench to a white lawyer named Steven Wayne Smith. Smith, a fellow Republican who made a name for himself fighting affirmative action at the University of Texas, suggested that Rodriguez had been “underqualified” for his undergraduate education at Harvard. The Houston Chronicle reported that Smith decided to take on Rodriguez because “he thought a Hispanic wouldn’t do well in the Republican primary.” [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

Pedro started getting worried when his hands were so swollen he needed a larger size of plastic gloves. [ThinkProgress]

They give tons of attention to these pointless stories while ignoring educational corruption just 15 minutes away. This willful ignorance is worse than Nancy Rodriguez when she intentionally ignored and covered up for the University of Louisville when we broke the Robert Felner scandal wide open. [H-L]

The black dad that you don’t think exists falls asleep with his son on his chest after rocking him for what felt like forever. His wife transfers the baby from his arms to the crib and coaxes him to bed where he only sleeps for three or four hours. He spent most of his wife’s pregnancy talking about legacy and is determined to create one. So he rises at 3:30 in the morning to take photographs of the city at its emptiest. He has to be to work at 7 and knows he won’t have the energy to chase his dreams after a dehumanizing 12 hour shift. [HuffPo]

Fame Whore & Hate Group Still Foaming

Any of you Frankfort folks know what kinda scheme Teresa Barton is running these days? She’s up to something and is pretty fired up about it. [Deep Frankfort Thoughts]

Lawyers for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis say the altered marriage licenses her office issued to same-sex couples are valid because they have been recognized by Kentucky’s highest elected officials. [H-L]

A worsening political dispute on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group threatens one of the few silver linings for U.S. policy in the Middle East. [HuffPo]

They waited until dark. Hoisting the youngest in his arms, telling his three other boys to stay close to their eight-months-pregnant mother, Ahmad Al Tybawi took a deep breath and walked into the night — joining other Syrians fleeing civil war through the barren fields and rocky hills toward Jordan. [C-J/AKN]

Jeb Bush unveiled a plan on Tuesday to repeal ObamaCare and replace it with healthcare measures intended to give more authority to states. [The Hill]

Wanna read what Greg Stumbo’s LRC staffers wrote? It’s all about how the drug war needs to be larger. [Floyd County Times]

A former Chicago Public Schools chief executive officer pleaded guilty in federal court on Tuesday to one count of wire fraud in a case involving $2 million in kickbacks and bribes she agreed to accept in exchange for a lucrative contract. [Reuters]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is indicating in court documents that she doesn’t intend to stop her deputies from issuing marriage licenses to same sex couples even if an appeals court lifts the injunction under which the licenses are being issued. [Ashland Independent]

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers? [ProPublica]

Council Chambers in Glasgow City Hall will soon have a permanent reminder that more than 83,000 service members have been left behind as prisoners of war and missing in action. [Glasgow Daily Times]

You can tell a lot about a candidate’s ideas from a website. OK, sometimes you can’t—ahead of the first Republican presidential debate, we examined all 17 candidates’ websites and found nearly half of them didn’t even have a page for their policy agendas. [Politico]

A group of Rowan County leaders who support County Clerk Kim Davis wsent(sic) to Frankfort on Tuesday, hoping to speak with Gov. Steve Beshear about the controversy surrounding same-sex marriage that has put their community in the national spotlight. [WAVE3]

Earlier this month, Wal-Mart trumpeted that it had beaten a goal it set five years ago: to open at least 275 stores in food deserts by 2016. That targeted expansion into “neighborhoods without access to fresh affordable groceries” came as part of the retailer’s “healthier food initiative,” lauded by — and launched with — First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011. Wal-Marts have been popping up in lower-income urban areas where grocery stores are scarce ever since. [NPR]

What? A bunch of backward-ass bigots want to spend half a million bucks to hold a special session to do something that pertains to like three people? Surely not. [H-L]

With just five candidates at Tuesday’s Democratic primary debate, the stage almost looked empty compared with the Republican debates. The most recent round of GOP contests featured a total of 15 candidates sparring in two separate events, including an 11-person primetime showdown. [HuffPo]

Gubernatorial Race Still Boring As Hell

A federal judge dismissed four of the five counts against Jesse Benton Friday, ruling that the U.S. Department of Justice violated an agreement with the former aide to U.S. Sens. Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell by using his statements to obtain an indictment. [H-L]

If Paul Ryan can’t save the GOP, could Democrats? Many Republicans have been turning toward the Wisconsin representative as their best shot of electing a House speaker to replace John Boehner (R-Ohio), who wants to leave his post at the end of the month. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services could be in for some major changes after the upcoming governor’s race. [C-J/AKN]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

Democrat Jack Conway has a five-point lead over Republican Matt Bevin in the latest publicly released poll, but he enjoys a commanding fundraising lead over Bevin, a gap which could prove critical on Nov. 3. With only 25 days before voters go to the polls, Conway has $2.3 million on hand to Bevin’s $674,427. [Ronnie Ellis]

Granny Mitch is still keeping his promise of ruining the country by spending every waking moment attacking the president. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell railed against President Obama’s foreign policy on Sunday, calling his philosophy “mind-boggling” and evidence of a belief in “American retreat around the world.” [The Hill]

They recognized a problem, so now they’re attacking it head on. Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo and other local and state leaders hosted a public forum in Floyd County to address the drug problem in the region. One statistic inspired the event that leaders say they hope will save lives. [WYMT]

About four miles from the world’s largest Christopher Columbus parade in midtown Manhattan on Monday, hundreds of Native Americans and their supporters will hold a sunrise prayer circle to honor ancestors who were slain or driven from their land. [Reuters]

Conway, in an effort to walk that line, has emphasized his allegiance toward the coal industry and opposition toward Obama administration regulations designed to lower emissions from coal-fired power plants. Conway released a pro-coal ad in September boasting “he stood up against Obama” when he sued the Environmental Protection Agency over the coal regulations. [Cincinnasti.com]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway has a major financial advantage over Republican Matt Bevin, who has struggled to raise funds and has loaned his campaign $995,100 during the general election period. [WFPL]

The Republican leaders of a House committee who have been in a bitter partisan battle with Democrats are enmeshed in a new fight with one of the committee’s former staff members. A former investigator for the Republicans on the House Select Committee on Benghazi plans to file a complaint in federal court next month alleging that he was fired unlawfully in part because his superiors opposed his efforts to conduct a comprehensive investigation into the 2012 attack on the American diplomatic mission in the Libyan city rather than focus primarily on the role of the State Department and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. [NY Times]

Democratic state Auditor Adam Edelen is within striking distance of raising a record-breaking $1 million for his re-election campaign, greatly outpacing his Republican rival, state Rep. Mike Harmon. [H-L]

The U.S. Department of Defense will seek to make “condolence payments” to families of victims of a U.S. air strike that mistakenly hit a Medecins Sans Frontieres hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, killing 22 people, the Pentagon said on Saturday. [HuffPo]