The KY State Police Need Your Help

Danny Ray Burden fell asleep in mid-sentence as he was booked into the Grant County jail, toppling over on the bench where he sat. Prodded awake, he coughed, shook and pleaded for emergency medical attention. [H-L]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton holds double-digit leads nationally over all her Democratic challengers, including a dream team of contenders that remain on the sidelines, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

A few Kentucky counties are searching for poll workers for the upcoming Nov. 3 general election but not Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

The “Resolution Condemning Judicial Tyranny And Petitioning God’s Mercy” asks the state to join rural Blount County in fighting against the ruling and to “protect Natural Marriage from lawless court opinions and the financial schemes of the enemies of righteousness.” [Reuters]

Stephen l. Pruitt today officially became Kentucky’s sixth Commissioner of Education since passage of the landmark Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 that created the position. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years. Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress. [NPR]

This will make your eyes roll back in your head. The Kentucky Executive Branch Ethics Commission described state Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, as having demonstrated “the highest level of ethical standards.” [Ashland Independent]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties collected more than $58,200 in pledges for the coming five years during its annual Building Hope Community Breakfast. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton, as she offered up a sheaf of new health care proposals, said she was “building on the Affordable Care Act.” But lurking in those proposals was a veiled criticism of President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: For many families, the Affordable Care Act has not made health care affordable. [NY Times]

Kentucky State Police are asking for help from the public as they search for a Knott County woman who has been missing since May. Natasha Fugate Jones was last seen by family on May 7, and state police began searching for her on June 7, according to a news release by Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Three top officials with Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign claim political motivations are behind charges alleging they violated federal financial disclosure laws by secretly paying an influential Iowa politician for his endorsement. Paul, a former Republican congressman from Texas, will be called as a prosecution witness at the trial, set for next Tuesday in Des Moines. [AP]

Larry Dale Hit The Nail On Its Head

About 50 people came out on a rainy Saturday morning to see U.S. Sen. Rand Paul rally for Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin. [H-L]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

Republican Whitney Westerfield and Democrat Andy Beshear are locked in a dead heat for attorney general with just over a month before election day, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [C-J/AKN]

Vice President Joe Biden on Saturday praised gay rights activists for the progress they have made in recent years. The vice president gave the keynote address at the Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, during which he honored past civil rights leaders and commended current ones for working to fulfill the principles embodied the Declaration of Independence. [The Hill]

While it’s not the winter just yet, area homeless shelters are bracing for their busiest months now before their supplies run out. “With the winter coming, what we have isn’t going to last,” Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter director Michele Bradford said. “It won’t last.” Employees at the 24-hour Beacon of Hope shelter in Winchester say their food supply is quickly dwindling. [WKYT]

The Associated Press properly identified Liberty Counsel — the legal group defending Kentucky’s Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis — as an anti-LGBT hate group, in an all-too-rare example of a major news outlet accurately informing its audience about Liberty’s extreme views. [MMFA]

What no one is saying here? Rand Paul and his wife, Kelly, are miffed at Matt Bevin over some nasty remarks Bevin allegedly made to Kelly some time ago. It’s a big enough rift that the McConnell crew talk about it all the time. [CN|Toot]

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are set to wade into contentious social matters in their new term beginning on Monday including affirmative action, union powers and voting rights, and could add major cases involving abortion and birth control. [Reuters]

The head of the high tech company coming to Morehead was a guest speaker at Wednesday’s meeting of the Kentucky House Special Committee on Advanced Communications and Information Technology. Robert Schena, CEO and cofounder of Rajant Corporation, told committee members that his company’s technology aboard MSU’s miniature satellites could create a network in space that could be used to keep military defense systems running if the U.S. were ever attacked. [The Morehead News]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

Barren County magistrates voted to adopt an ordinance on second reading Friday to set the county’s real estate tax rate for for the current fiscal year during a special-called Fiscal Court meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Edward Snowden is still waiting on the Justice Department to take up his offer of a plea deal, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents says. [Politico]

Bevin is the most inept candidate in either party since Peppy Martin won the 1999 GOP nomination after Republicans decided to make a statement about public financing of gubernatorial campaigns by not fielding any legitimate contenders. Still, given Kentucky’s anti-Obama sentiment, Conway cannot win in November unless he gets the Democratic base to turn out 100 percent. So far, he has done little or nothing to make this happen. His campaign has been only marginally better than Bevin’s. [Larry Dale Keeling]

The Supreme Court on Friday issued a posthumous response to Alfredo Prieto, a serial killer on Virginia’s death row whose lawyers had petitioned the court several times to put his execution on hold. [HuffPo]

The Next Governor Will Likely Ignore It

Kentucky’s next governor will inherit about $30 billion in public pension debt from departing Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear — more than twice what the state government spends in a year, and up 40 percent since voters re-elected Beshear in 2011. [John Cheves]

The real problem is too many young people still can’t afford a college education. [HuffPo]

Maybe next time he’ll try city council instead of big dogging in the race for goober. Independent Drew Curtis said he would vote for Donald Trump, which frankly seemed like an odd choice for the progressive, populist candidate from Lexington. By Friday, he was walking that back in a tweet. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has won the endorsement of the National Education Association (NEA), the teachers union said in a statement Saturday. [The Hill]

Anyone who spends time in the alternate universe that is Kentucky politics hears some version of this line over and over: “This is the strangest governor’s race I’ve ever seen.” [Ronnie Ellis]

President Barack Obama said on Friday that he has asked his team to look for new ways to enforce existing regulations to keep guns away from criminals in the wake of the mass shooting in Oregon. [Reuters]

Shipping containers can travel all over the world. Now, one has landed in a Kentucky woman’s yard, and it is being turned into her new home. [WDRB]

In Alabama, a positive drug test can have dire repercussions for pregnant women and new mothers. Their newborns can be taken from them. They can lose custody of their other children. They can face lengthy sentences in the most notorious women’s prison in the United States and thousands of dollars in fees and fines. Yet the hospitals that administer those drug tests — and turn the results over to authorities — are exceedingly reluctant to disclose their policies to the public. [ProPublica]

It’s the type of decline Southcentral Kentucky counties are thrilled to incur. Barren, Allen, Metcalfe, Monroe, Edmonson and Hart counties have enjoyed a drop of more than 1 percent in jobless rates over the last year, a study released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in September showed. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A great swathe of Pluto that features a strange rippling terrain is perhaps the highlight of the latest image release from the New Horizons mission. [BBC]

The report cards are in — not for students, but districts and schools across the state. Scores recorded by the Kentucky Department of Education in the Unbridled Learning College and Career-Readiness report released Thursday morning show that the Madison County Schools district “outperformed all seven surrounding county school districts as well as Berea Independent Schools,” an online release from MCS noted. [Richmond Register]

As Governor of the USA’s worst state, Florida, Jeb Bush embraced his inner Veto Corleone. His 2,549 line-item vetoes cut millions of dollars from social programs, health centers and projects backed by people who crossed him. [Mother Jones]

It’s almost funny watching education reporters act surprised that school districts pretend to improve with self-evaluations. It’s like no one believes school district administrations can be more corrupt than Frankfort. Along with hard work, more favorable self-evaluations played a role in Fayette County Public Schools’ improved performance in Kentucky’s accountability system in 2014-15, acting senior director of academic services Marlene Helm. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) doubled down on his support for tighter gun control legislation on Thursday in the wake of the mass shooting at an Oregon community college. [HuffPo]

You’re Hung Over From The Debate

A federal judge has barred a Floyd County coal operator from interfering with or threatening federal health and safety inspectors. [H-L]

More than half of the tax cuts proposed in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s (R) tax plan would flow to America’s wealthiest citizens, according to a report released by the nonpartisan group Citizens for Tax Justice, which advocates for “requiring the wealthy to pay their fair share.” [HuffPo]

Although she returned to her office Monday, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis remained out of sight as one of her deputies issued a heavily altered marriage license to a lesbian couple, likely shielding Davis from more jail time but not the disappointment of her fiery religious supporters. [C-J/AKN]

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are investigating four Defense Department labs for mishandling deadly germs used in bioterrorism research, a spokesman said Friday. [NY Times]

It’s the home stretch of campaign season for Jenean Hampton and she could make history. We still know little about her beyond her claims of conservatism and that she supports everything Matt Bevin says. [WHAS11]

We’re surprised Jerry Lundergan hasn’t been footing his bills. Gov. Terry McAuliffe has paid Virginia nearly $40,000 to cover the cost of personal trips on state-owned planes since taking office last year, trying to avoid even the appearance of impropriety in the wake of the gift scandal that led to criminal convictions for his predecessor, Robert F. McDonnell. [WaPo]

The end of this week marks the first month that first grade teachers in the county have taught students who experienced full-day kindergarten last year. [Richmond Register]

Every day in America, mortgage companies attempt to foreclose on homeowners using false documents. It’s a byproduct of the mortgage securitization craze during the housing bubble, when loans were sliced and diced so haphazardly that the actual ownership was confused. [The Incercept]

A tract of land the city was interested in purchasing is going to cost less than what officials had initially thought. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Politicians are suddenly eager to disown failed policies on American prisons, but they have failed to reckon with the history. [The Atlantic]

Andrea Carman, 33, of Owingsville, is the cleaner at the Morehead Goodwill store. She started working there three years ago but the former manager quickly concluded that she needed one-on-one help to train for the job. [The Morehead News]

President Obama has been talking about creating a Consumer Reports-style college ratings system for more than a year. But the effort seemed to get bogged down in politics and a debate over what metrics to include. [NPR]

Dine out Thursday and fight AIDS during this year’s Dining Out for Life, a community celebration to benefit AIDS Volunteers of Lexington. [H-L]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) are calling for a ban on the ability of employers to check the credit history of their employees, saying that the practice is a form of discrimination unfairly targets people who have suffered as a result of the 2008 financial crisis. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Is Still The Absolute Dumbest

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

College students this past fall likely borrowed the least amount for higher education in five years, federal data show, amid declining overall enrollment and a drop in lending to students at for-profit schools. [HuffPo]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s break with President Obama on Arctic drilling this week represented a public shift left for the Democrat, a move greens say could be the start of a push to shore up support among environmentalists ahead of primary season. [The Hill]

Maintaining a healthy heart or testing for those who are suffering from heart-related illness became a lot closer and simpler for Richmond residents Tuesday after the opening of KentuckyOne Health’s Heart and Vascular Imaging Clinic. [Richmond Register]

“The Wire” creator and former Baltimore Sun reporter talks about a historic public housing fight, race and what makes white people go “batshit, batshit crazy.” [ProPublica]

A “Stand Fast Kim” banner attached to a plane rippled across the sky above thousands of roaring religious freedom advocates at the state Capitol. [Ashland Independent]

Every year, 40 percent of the food grown in the United States ends up in the garbage. A lot of that waste happens at the consumer level — according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), about 25 percent of the food that Americans buy is thrown away. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky Senator and Republican Presidential Candidate Rand Paul visited Corbin Friday where he had a chance to meet with local citizens. [Times-Tribune]

Donald Trump on Saturday sought to give Jeb Bush a black eye over a black hand. Trump wailed on the former Florida governor for a Photoshopped picture in a campaign leaflet sent out by a pro-Bush super PAC that shows him with a black left hand, and his body apparently super-imposed on a picture of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. [Politico]

As required by state law, the Rowan County Board of Education has scheduled a public hearing in the board’s meeting room on Wednesday, Sept. 2, at 6 p.m. [The Morehead News]

The US government is launching a $5m (£3.2m) initiative to combat the use and trafficking of heroin, with a focus on prioritising treatment rather than punishment. [BBC]

But they can still access every other horrible site on earth. A website that helps married people have affairs is now off limits to Kentucky state employees on their state-issued computers and phones. [H-L]

If you are running for office as a Republican today, you have to mention your reverence for the Constitution at least as much as you mention your love for Ronald Reagan. But Republican politicians have a few glaring blind spots when it comes to the Constitution. One of those is the 14th Amendment, a pillar of our inclusive democracy, a key component of which Republican presidential candidates are now asking us to ignore or change. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Bigots Flying Hate Flag High

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

This summer, Zachary Schwarzkopf spent five weeks at Morehead State University in the prestigious Governor’s Scholars Program. In addition to enrichment classes in civics, economics and leadership, the program provides a huge perk: a $40,000 Presidential Scholarship to the University of Kentucky, provided you have a 28 ACT score and a grade-point average of 3.3. [H-L]

Famed neurosurgeon Ben Carson says that most medical research can be conducted without using fetal tissue, which has been in the news recently after a series of secretly taped but edited videos showed Planned Parenthood officials discussing how to legally provide aborted tissue to researchers. [HuffPo]

Pushing a toxic mixture of natural gas liquids through an aging pipeline near Mammoth Cave National Park threatens the world-famous cave’s unique and fragile ecological systems, the National Park Service is warning. [C-J/AKN]

Way to go, Kentucky bigots, way to go. Betsy Layne High School in rural Kentucky this year had a two-page yearbook spread that featured all of the seniors on the boys basketball team. Except, one senior was left out of the tribute: Dalton Maldonado, the team’s starting point guard who came out publicly as gay a couple months ago. [Out Sports]

The stupid is still thick with Kim Davis. She employs Nathan Davis just like her mother employed her — nepotism runs in the family. A Kentucky clerk’s office turned away a gay couple seeking a marriage license on Thursday, defying a federal judge’s order that dismissed her argument involving religious freedom. [AP]

On July 24, Turkey launched a massive military campaign that included sweeping attacks against Kurdish forces as well as minor strikes on Islamic State positions south of its border. Just five days later, the Turkish government inked a contract to hire a team of prominent lobbyists to add to its already formidable army of influence peddlers in Washington. [The Intercept]

A classic Barry Manilow song inspired state employees to dig deep for the kickoff of the Kentucky Employees Charitable Campaign Tuesday. [WHAS11]

In a new partnership with Yelp, ProPublica has been given unprecedented access to the rating site’s 1.3 million reviews of healthcare providers. One dental chain attracted 3,000 reviews, the vast majority bad. [ProPublica]

This is political patronage at its finest. A governor’s order that triggered a leadership shakeup at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville drew criticism and bewilderment Tuesday from members of the committee that oversees the 41-year-old event. [WFPL]

It appears that New Zealand is finally ready to throw their domestic coal habit into Mount Doom — by 2018, the country will cease to use coal as a source of domestic energy production. [ThinkProgress]

We’ve finally updated the massive document covering what really happened in Montgomery County. [Page One]

Rand Paul’s (R-Hopeless) campaign on Wednesday released a video highlighting fellow 2016 GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump’s past praise of Democrats. [The Hill]

Members of a Vermont legislative committee are going to be asking why Kentucky State Police weren’t informed in a timely manner about the death of a Vermont inmate who had been serving time in a private Kentucky prison. [H-L]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… In deep water off the coast of Sicily, scientists have found a large and very mysterious monolith that is believed to have been hewn from rock some 10,000 years ago. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul Apparently Has A Tax Plan

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

It became clear from the Fancy Farm Picnic last week that one key line of attack from Democrat Jack Conway and his running mate, Sannie Overly, will be that their opponents were — gasp — born outside the state. [C-J/AKN]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Fewer entrances will be accessible at Ashland Community and Technical College’s three campuses following a security initiative that results in more doors being locked from the outside. [Ashland Independent]

The United States has secured commitments from a dozen countries to accept nearly half of the 52 Guantanamo prisoners already cleared for transfer, U.S. officials said on Friday, as the Obama administration tries to accelerate efforts to close the military prison. [Reuters]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republicans should not use a must-pass government spending bill to defund Planned Parenthood, despite increasing pressure from conservatives who want to use a threat of a shutdown to target the embattled women’s health group. [Politico]

Social Security is approaching its 80th birthday, and the federal government’s largest benefit program is at a pivotal point in its history. [WKYT]

Twenty-nine of the nation’s top scientists — including Nobel laureates, veteran makers of nuclear arms and former White House science advisers — wrote to President Obama on Saturday to praise the Iran deal, calling it innovative and stringent. [NY Times]

Patty Teague got out of the Warren County Public Library’s Nissan Rogue SUV that is on loan to her, took out a rolling cart and stacked a couple of blue crates filled with books on it Thursday. [BGDN]

Republican leaders who have watched Donald Trump’s summer surge with alarm now believe that his presidential candidacy has been contained and may begin to collapse because of his repeated attacks on a Fox News Channel star and his refusal to pledge his loyalty to the eventual GOP nominee. [WaPo]

James Nicholson lay in a Kentucky intensive care unit, days after he was beaten with a makeshift mace in a private prison in April. His skull cracked and his brain bruised, he told a nurse he believed the year was 1960 and Jimmy Carter was president. Kentucky State Police investigated the attack on Nicholson, a Vermont inmate, at a prison run by the for-profit Corrections Corporation of America. But after he died in his sleep a few weeks later, no one told police. [H-L]

One year after the shooting that cast greater scrutiny on how police interact with black communities, the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, will be marked with a somber march and a moment of silence. [HuffPo]