Poor Kentuckians Will Suffer Under Bevin

Fayette County School District officials say they have found the student responsible for a graffiti threat left in a bathroom at Edythe J. Hayes Middle School. [H-L]

One Middle East catastrophe apparently wasn’t enough for some supporters of the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. So they’ve continued to try to shape policy relating to the region, offering punditry in the wake of each fresh crisis. [HuffPo]

Traveling around rural Clay County, Jennifer Gates seeks out people in need of health coverage. There are plenty of them. From the homeless veteran under a bridge to the low-paid school cafeteria cook, Gates helps them find health coverage through kynect, Kentucky’s version of the Affordable Care Act. [C-J/AKN]

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) on Sunday said Donald Trump’s claim that scores of Arab-Americans cheered as the Twin Towers fell on 9/11 is unsubstantiated. [The Hill]

Members of the Housing Authority of Glasgow’s board of directors were scheduled to approve flat rent increases for the 2016 fiscal year, but action on the issue was tabled, once again. [Glasgow Daily Times]

South America’s vast Amazon region harbors one of the world’s most diverse collection of tree species, but more than half may be at risk for extinction due to ongoing deforestation to clear land for farming, ranching and other purposes, scientists say. [Reuters]

For the 16th holiday season, a local musician is helping provide for those less fortunate. Eddie Riffe organized his first food drive in 1999, when he asked those who visited the AMVETS in Ashland to donate nonperishable foods when they came to hear him perform. [Ashland Independent]

Alberta’s carbon footprint, spurred on by the tar sands industry, has been steadily growing in recent years. So when the New Democratic Party took power in a surprise victory earlier this year, environmentalists hoped it signaled a turning point for Canada’s largest oil-producing province. [ThinkProgress]

Just a little over a year ago, it was “space and shelves,” but no food was stored there. Now, the Colonel’s Cupboard helps feed the one in five Eastern Kentucky University college students who admitted to food insecurity in a study conducted just last year. [Richmond Register]

The ex-GOP House Benghazi Committee investigator who accused the panel of conducting a partisan witch hunt against Hillary Clinton filed suit Monday against the committee and Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) for wrongful termination and defamation. [Politico]

Big news in the hometown of small-minded bigot Kim Davis. A tanker carrying powder used to make concrete overturned on I-64 in Rowan County Monday morning. [The Morehead News]

A US air strike aimed at an IS checkpoint is likely to have killed four civilians, possibly including a child, the US military has said. [BBC]

What the hell is in the water in Lexington to make everyone — from the people still bickering about the election to self-hating Jim Gray — so terrible lately? [H-L]

Donald Trump approves of the way his supporters responded to a Black Lives Matter protester, reportedly beating him during a Saturday rally in Birmingham, Alabama. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Like It Or Not, Coal Is Quickly Dying

The latest report on coal production and employment in Kentucky reinforces how far and fast the industry has fallen. [H-L]

Former President George H.W. Bush takes some unexpected swipes at Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld, key members of his son’s administration, over their reaction to the Sept. 11 attacks, in a new biography of the 41st president. [HuffPo]

The State Capitol saw the first steps Wednesday in a dramatic five-week transition of power that is spreading both hope and concern across the commonwealth. [C-J/AKN]

Matt Bevin may have won his race for Kentucky governor on a vow to dismantle Obamacare, but he’s already backpedaling from his promise to uproot the law that is providing health care to nearly 1 in 10 people in his state. [Politico]

AT&T has filed a protest against a Kentucky state government project to expand broadband fiber throughout the state. The telecommunications giant claims KentuckyWired has an unfair advantage in the bidding process. In its protest, AT&T states KentuckyWired “almost certainly has confidential, inside information that no other bidder could have.” AT&T said KentuckyWired Executive Director Steve Rucker was deputy secretary of the state’s Finance and Administration Cabinet when the agency started developing its request for proposal. [WFPL]

America is undergoing a religious polarization. With more adults shedding their religious affiliations, as evidenced in the latest from the Pew Research Center, the country is becoming more secular. In the past seven years, using the new Pew data, Americans who identify with a religion declined six points. Overall, belief in God, praying daily and religious service attendance have all dropped since 2007. [WaPo]

Tuesday a picture of Bill Gates and his wife eating in Pikeville shared all over social media left many wondering why one of the richest men alive was in the area.

Accreditation agencies are supposed to make sure that colleges are putting students in a position to succeed. That’s not happening at schools overseen by one accreditor in particular. [ProPublica]

The easy explanation is that Democrat Jack Conway lost Tuesday’s election but Republican Matt Bevin also won it. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Rep. Steve King (R-IA) has his way, undocumented immigrants could be deported for protesting in congressional buildings in Washington, D.C. His office is circulating a bill titled “Ending the Sanctuary Capitol Policy Act of 2015,” which would authorize the Capitol Police to turn over undocumented immigrants protesting or rallying on Capitol Hill grounds for potential deportation proceedings, according to a copy of the bill obtained by ThinkProgress. [ThinkProgress]

Access to affordable health care and finances – with some common ground between parties on fixing retirement funds – were among the top issues on the minds of area residents as they went to the polls to vote in Tuesday’s general election. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thousands of federal inmates are getting out of prison because of a change in the way the U.S. government sentences drug criminals. It’s part of a broader movement to reconsider tough-on-crime laws that were passed during the War on Drugs. [NPR]

The man accused of shooting Richmond police officer Daniel Ellis Wednesday had absconded parole after serving a prison sentence for manufacturing methamphetamine, records show. [H-L]

The long-awaited text of a landmark U.S.-backed Pacific trade deal was released on Thursday, revealing the details of a pact aimed at freeing up commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy but criticized for its opacity. [HuffPo]

UofL’s Great For Fraud & Sports Sexytime

ESPN reported Tuesday that five former University of Louisville basketball players and recruits told their “Outside the Lines” reporters that they attended parties at a campus dorm from 2010-14 that included strippers. [H-L]

A key House Democrat suggested Monday that Vice President Joe Biden can’t win the Democratic nomination on his own and should not enter the contest. [HuffPo]

The candidates for Kentucky lieutenant governor drew sharp distinctions between one another on a Kentucky Educational Television debate that was dominated by education issues. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton asserted at Tuesday night’s Democratic presidential debate that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden “stole very important information that has unfortunately fallen into a lot of the wrong hands.” [The Intercept]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted Kentucky a one-year extension for meeting requirements of the stringent new identification security law known as REAL ID – meaning a Kentucky driver’s license is still sufficient for gaining access to the vast majority of federal installations. [Press Release]

Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has his work cut out for him in passing a bill to raise the $18.1 trillion debt ceiling. [The Hill]

The Republican Governors’ Association is returning to the Kentucky airwaves with a $1.6 million ad buy on behalf of Republican gubernatorial nominee Matt Bevin. [Ronnie Ellis]

The CIA has told Congress that the name of an alleged secret agency source, mentioned but then partially redacted by the U.S. State Department from an email received on Hillary Clinton’s private server was not considered by the agency to be secret at all. [Reuters]

The City of Glasgow and the Electric Plant Board’s innovative Infotricity model has garnered statewide recognition. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Inside a sleek Denver condominium, George W. Bush let a hundred donors to his brother’s campaign in on a secret. Of all the rival Republican candidates, there is one who gets under the former president’s skin, whom he views as perhaps Jeb Bush’s most serious rival for the party’s nomination. [Politico]

A former Upper Big Branch mine section boss, a superintendent and a fire boss testified Monday about Massey Energy executives’ unwillingness to provide the amount of manpower or equipment needed to safety produce coal, all the while demanding high production numbers. [Richmond Register]

Ohio has put executions on hold until at least 2017 as the US state struggles to acquire the lethal drugs needed to carry out death sentences. [BBC]

A prominent businessman who is a county magistrate in Harlan County has been charged with two felonies, Kentucky State Police announced Monday. [H-L]

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission notified Planned Parenthood on Monday that it will terminate the reproductive health provider’s Medicaid contract. The move is a response to the sting videos created by an anti-abortion group that showed the organization’s staff members discussing the donation of fetal tissue to medical researchers. [HuffPo]

Sounds Like KSU’s Turning Into A Circus

There’s growing talk among faculty at Kentucky State University to push for a “no confidence” vote regarding President Raymond Burse after they say tensions continue to escalate between the leader and university professors. [H-L]

Braving masked “commandos,” razor-sharp border fences and baton-wielding riot police, hundreds of thousands of refugees are fleeing war and misery by flocking to Western Europe in the largest mass movement of people since World War II. [HuffPo]

The Westboro Baptist Church, a Kansas group known for its caustic anti-gay rhetoric, took aim at Kim Davis on Monday, accusing the county clerk of hypocrisy and adultery. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is hitting back at Jeb Bush, calling the former Florida governor “pathetic” and doubling down on his pointed comments that 9/11 happened while his brother then-President George W. Bush was in office. [The Hill]

Kentucky, once a near Democratic monopoly, is seeing more voters register Republican and now has a Republican-majority congressional district for the first time since 1999. [Richmond Register]

“The shots knocked me to the ground and felt like a truck hit me,” wrote Chris Mintz in his first public account of being shot five times during the deadly rampage at an Oregon community college while trying to warn fellow students to take cover. [Reuters]

The pieces weren’t literally “falling” into place, but with slow, careful maneuvering of cranes and heavy equipment, they were getting placed in and around the building at the Glasgow Regional Landfill where methane gas is going to be converted into electricity. [Glasgow Daily Times]

One in three children seek outpatient mental health care services from a primary care provider instead of a specialist, a new study shows. The findings highlight the potential for medical professionals to effectively treat mental illness by collaborating with each other — particularly amid psychiatrist shortages that make it hard for some Americans to get an appointment with a mental health provider. [ThinkProgress]

Just before noon on Saturday, Oct. 17, The Bardstown Police Department posted a statement from Police Chief Rick McCubbin on their Facebook page. His statement comes after the firing of Officer Nick Houck. On Friday, Bardstown P.D. confirmed that Houck was fired for interfering with the investigation into the disappearance of Nelson Co. woman Crystal Rogers. The mother of five disappeared in July. According to Nelson County Sheriff Ed Mattingly she is now presumed dead. Her then boyfriend, Brooks Houck — the brother of Nick Houck, is the main suspect. [WHAS11]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A 125 million-year-old fossil – described by scientists as an exceptionally cute furball – has been unearthed, scientists report. [BBC]

Ashland Economic Development Director Chris Pullem says a rapid response team is already being assembled after AK Steel’s announcement on Friday morning that it is temporarily idling the blast furnace and related steelmaking operations at the Ashland Works in mid-December. [Ashland Independent]

In one of the more dramatic salvos of the first Democratic presidential debate on Tuesday, Martin O’Malley took a swipe at Bernie Sanders, claiming that the Vermont senator “panders to the NRA.” [The Intercept]

In the months leading up to the formal announcement that he was running for president, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul told me a few times that he didn’t think a presidential campaign would be much fun. As of last week, it seems obvious that was one of the few predictions Paul made about running for president that has come true. [H-L]

There’s no stopping the House of Representatives in federal court. A federal judge on Monday declined an Obama administration request to allow it to appeal a controversial September ruling that allowed a House lawsuit over the Affordable Care Act to move forward. [HuffPo]

Good Morning Department Of Bad News

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Everybody freaked out about the minimum wage again this weekend. [H-L]

By his collapsing poll numbers, despite his intense campaigning, we know that Jeb Bush might be one of the worst candidates of all time. But, sometimes, bad politicians make good elected officials. So, the question remains, would Jeb Bush make a good Commander in Chief? No. [HuffPo]

The heavy rains from summer storms and flash floods in the Louisville area this summer were bad enough when they hit but they appear to have left something behind that’s still causing problems — mold in homes. Complaints of mold surged during July, but the Louisville Metro government health department shows that the numbers of complaints have been rising steadily for four years. [C-J/AKN]

Ken Wamsley sometimes dreams that he’s playing softball again. He’ll be at center field, just like when he played slow pitch back in his teens, or pounding the ball over the fence as the crowd goes wild. Other times, he’s somehow inexplicably back at work in the lab. [The Intercept]

It should be easy to come up with a weekly column during a governor’s race, but the 2015 election between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway is unlike any I’ve ever seen. [Ronnie Ellis]

Two states that had blocked gay marriage are in legal battles over granting parenthood status to same-sex couples: Arkansas is trying to throw out a suit from couples seeking the status and Texas is saying it does not have forms ready. [Reuters]

Beginning Oct. 1, visitors to the Blue Grass Army Depot will have new vetting requirements that include background checks. [Richmond Register]

When we wrote in April about New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s budget “sins,” one of the biggest was the money shuffle he engineered after his 2010 decision to kill an $8.7 billion commuter rail tunnel from New Jersey to New York City. [ProPublica]

Flooding is not a new problem in Morehead but a committee formed by Mayor Jim Tom Trent has presented new ideas aimed at tackling the issue. [The Morehead News]

At the outset of the campaign, Nevada was thought to be Rand Paul’s western firewall, a state uniquely suited to the Kentucky senator’s self-described “libertarianish” message. Between the remnants of his father’s political organization and a caucus system that rewards passion and grassroots energy, it figured to be as good a place as any for Paul to plant his flag and pull out an early state win. But things haven’t gone according to plan for Paul, and nowhere is that more obvious than in Nevada. [Politico]

Louisville is obsessed with killing its people. Everything is puppies and rainbows, though. [WDRB]

Democratic presidential hopeful Hilary Clinton has hit back at one of her Republican rivals, Jeb Bush, over who is responsible for instability in Iraq. [BBC]

Just what Eastern Kentucky needs: another damn prison. Because that’ll solve everything. Locking people up in the name of creating government jobs. [H-L]

A St. Louis County policeman who boasted of how he spent his “annual Michael Brown bonus” has prompted an investigation by the department. [HuffPo]

This All Helps Rand Win Re-Election

It’s a rare Sunday session for senators, and on the agenda are efforts to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law and reviving the federal Export-Import Bank. [H-L]

Someone has taken up Justice Stephen Breyer’s invitation to challenge the constitutionality of the death penalty. [HuffPo]

It wasn’t until after Sarah Norris dropped out of high school that she found an educational program that worked for her. [C-J/AKN]

Has he stalled? It doesn’t matter. This is a push to raise his U.S. Senate profile and it’s worked. A year ago, Rand Paul, the libertarian-minded senator from Kentucky, was among the leading potential candidates in the GOP presidential race, topping at least three national polls in spring and early summer. [The Hill]

Officials from Eastern Kentucky University’s aviation degree program flew into the Ashland Regional Airport Thursday to greet students interested in earning a college degree while spending as much time in an airplane cockpit as in a college classroom. [Ashland Independent]

Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz ripped into his party’s establishment on Friday, calling Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell a liar during an unusual public attack on the floor of the Senate. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin, the Republican nominee for governor, acknowledged Thursday for the first time that switching from Kentucky’s state health exchange to a federal exchange won’t in itself affect the state’s expansion of Medicaid. [Ronnie Ellis]

Twenty-five years ago this weekend, the Americans With Disabilities Act was signed into law, officially outlawing discrimination against disabled people in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and government services. [Mother Jones]

Western Kentucky school boards are the absolute worst. Glasgow Independent Schools plans to appeal an opinion from the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General that said its board of education violated the state’s open meetings law in March. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The H-2 visa program invites foreign workers to do some of the most menial labor in America. Then it leaves them at the mercy of their employers. Thousands of these workers have been abused — deprived of their fair pay, imprisoned, starved, beaten, raped, and threatened with deportation if they dare complain. And the government says it can do little to help. [BuzzFeed]

Citizens and emergency responders were only hours away from what could have been a very serious situation when last week’s storms knocked out power at the radio repeater site on Tower Road off Dry Creek Road. [The Morehead News]

You should check out these photos of Dubya and Unka Dick from September 11, 2011. Seriously, not joking, check them out. [Flickr]

A bunch of fat, racist, white guys played dress-up on Friday and showed their true colors. Kentucky’s state government should not turn its back on Confederate symbols, including the “stars and bars” battle flag and Jefferson Davis, speakers told more than a hundred people at a “Southern pride” rally outside the Capitol Friday. [John Cheves]

Mitch McConnell fast-tracked a bill to defund Planned Parenthood on Friday because of an undercover video of a Planned Parenthood doctor discussing the donation of fetal tissue after abortions. But McConnell was one of many Republicans who voted to lift a ban on fetal tissue donations after abortions in 1993 — the very move that legalized Planned Parenthood’s actions. [HuffPo]

Is Lex Envious Of The Lou Shootings?

If Matt Bevin’s ignorance and code words leave you with a bitter taste in your mouth, you’re not alone. [H-L]

As Congress prepares to give President Barack Obama expedited powers to “fast-track” trade deals through Congress, many U.S. steel mills and skeptics of Obama’s trade agenda are worried about steel dumping, the term commonly used to describe countries selling steel below market price. [HuffPo]

State contractors, Steve Beshear appointees to important state boards, and two directors of R.J. Corman Railroad Group were among the big givers to the Kentucky Democratic Party in April. [C-J/AKN]

In the dead of night, they swept in aboard V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. Landing in a remote region of one of the most volatile countries on the planet, they raided a village and soon found themselves in a life-or-death firefight. It was the second time in two weeks that elite US Navy SEALs had attempted to rescue American photojournalist Luke Somers. And it was the second time they failed. [The Nation]

If the city administration’s budget plan is adopted, Richmond Tourism will no longer be the lead organizer and funder of three popular events. [Richmond Register]

Presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-Under the Bridge) ceded the Senate floor just before midnight Wednesday after more than 10 hours. [The Hill]

A former Carter County paramedic pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges that she diluted pain medication belonging to Carter County Emergency Medical Services, according to court records. [Ashland Independent]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits rose slightly more than expected last week, but the underlying trend continued to suggest the labor market was tightening. [Reuters]

Weeks after a video that rocked the county and brought into question the authorities of county officials was uploaded to Facebook, state officials have decided to take the first steps into looking into the case. [Hazard Herald]

If Jack Conway falls, it won’t be because of President Barack Obama and Kentucky racism. It’ll be because of Jack’s poor political decision making and the handful of shitty people he surrounds himself with. If he wants to win, he’ll turn over a new leaf (like he did with refusing to fight against marriage equality) and he’ll abandon the typical KDP tripe. [Politico]

A jury trial was set to begin June 1 for the alleged murder of two-year-old Nathaniel Jones but like the past six years, it will be delayed again. Tiea Jones and her former boyfriend, Brian Gallagher, were indicted in 2010 for murder and criminal abuse, first degree. [The Morehead News]

The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show the 15 cities with the biggest population increases were in the South and West — with two exceptions: New York City and Columbus, Ohio. [NPR]

A man was shot and wounded early Wednesday while walking through Martin Luther King Park, Lexington police said. [H-L]

It wasn’t that the intelligence community was giving the administration wholesale faulty intelligence. It was that the administration was lying to the American people about what the intelligence actually showed. [HuffPo]