Bevin’s Pension Shenanigans Fell Apart

Kentucky ranks 37th among the states in children’s well-being, according to the 2018 Kids County Data Book, released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which conducted the research. [H-L]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld Racist Donald Trump’s travel ban. [HuffPo]

After this and the hiring of Jimmy Adams (see twitter or search this site’s archives), the state definitely needs to take over. Rhonda Martin says she just wanted Jefferson County Public Schools to protect her son, a severely autistic teenager with the mental capacity of a 3-year-old and the speech of a toddler half that age. [C-J/AKN]

Women activists are planning a “mass civil disobedience” act in the U.S. capital on Thursday ahead of weekend protests across the country against the Trump administration’s immigration policy. [Reuters]

Ten months into the county health department’s needle exchange program, 65 people have used it. [Richmond Register]

Way before Jared Kushner became internationally famous by moving into the White House to work for his father-in-law Donald Trump, those of us who live in New Jersey knew the family was an amazing story of immigrant success. [ProPublica]

East Ashland resident Mollie Hood was taking her trash out one recent morning when she came face to face with a man high on drugs. [Ashland Independent]

The Trump administration has attempted to quell national outrage about the thousands of parents and children who have recently been forcibly separated at the southern border, but protesters across the country aren’t letting up the pressure anytime soon. [ThinkProgress]

Attorneys for Matt Bevin Wednesday backed off their argument that a judge’s ruling that a pension reform bill is unconstitutional also put at risk other key legislation, including a bill allowing local governments and school districts to phase in higher pension contributions. [Ronnie Ellis]

A former aide to Roger J. Stone Jr., the longtime Trump adviser and self-described “dirty trickster,” was subpoenaed to appear before the grand jury hearing evidence in the Russia investigation and to hand over documents. [ NY Times]

Rowan County Fiscal Court has officially amended its subdivision regulations ordinance to hopefully cease the repurposing of a pipeline transporting potentially hazardous materials through Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

Arnovis Guidos Portillo remembers the authorities in green uniforms telling him that this would only be temporary. [WaPo]

In December 2004 Spencer Reinhard, Warren Lipka, Eric Borsuk and Charles “Chas” Allen executed a plan to rob several books worth millions of dollars from the Transylvania University special collection library. [H-L]

Donald Trump rolled out his alternative to systematic family separations at the border last week with a new plan: a massive increase of family detention. But the vision taking shape is sure to cost billions of dollars that Immigration and Customs Enforcement doesn’t have. [HuffPo]

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Hold On To Your Wigs Over SCOTUS

Kentucky and our nation are in an era when representative democracy is threatened by huge amounts of special-interest money, one-party rule and chief executives who act like they were elected emperors. The rule of law, the independent judiciary and the free press are under attack. So is government transparency. [Tom Eblen]

Former and current employees at a federal prison in California that began receiving a group of 1,000 immigration detainees on June 8 are warning that poor medical conditions in the prison in the Mojave Desert complex will endanger detainees, as well as the inmates and staff who are already at risk. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul is suing his neighbor turned attacker for medical costs and attorney fees relating to an incident for when he was tackled while mowing his lawn last year. [C-J/AKN]

As the U.S. attempts to reunite migrant families, children will bear the burden of helping to identify who and where their parents are. The 6-year-old girl heard asking to call her aunt on an audio recording from a detention facility this week has an advantage. [ProPublica]

Students at Eastern Kentucky University will be paying a bit more per credit hour starting this fall thanks to an asset preservation fee approved Monday during a Board of Regents meeting. [Richmond Register]

A Republican federal trial judge held on Thursday that the entire Consumer Financial Protection Bureau — all of it — must cease to exist. Judge Loretta Preska’s decision on this matter can barely even be described as an “opinion” because she devotes less than two pages of analysis to this question before proclaiming that a federal agency must be simply wiped away. [ThinkProgress]

Cheryl Spriggs, Denise Rodgers and John Mayhew were each Democrats at one point in their lives. And then they lost the ability to reason and now love an orange racist. [Ashland Independent]

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy announced on Wednesday that he would retire, setting the stage for a furious fight over the future direction of the Supreme Court. [NY Times]

Kerry Dilley was elected by his fellow school board members to be the new chairperson for the Barren County Schools Board of Education on Monday morning during a special-called meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The original source for Trump’s claim of 63,000 immigrant murders? Bad data from Steve King in 2006. [WaPo]

As the opioid epidemic continues and addiction experts push for more medication-assisted treatment, a controversial national nonprofit funded by drug companies is setting up shop in Kentucky. [WFPL]

The U.S. Justice Department on Thursday announced charges against 601 people including doctors and nurses for taking part in healthcare fraud and opioid-related crimes that resulted in more than $2 billion in losses. [Reuters]

Lexington must release information about the city’s surveillance cameras and the policies surrounding their use, a judge ordered last week. [H-L]

A restaurant can turn away a customer for any number of reasons ― from not following a dress code to being incredibly loud and obnoxious. And yes, it can turn away someone who the owner believes lies for a racist president who separates children from their parents at the border and ejects transgender people from the military; it can turn away someone who, by that person’s own choice in her profession, makes people in the establishment, including employees, feel uncomfortable. What a restaurant cannot do, however, is turn away someone because they’re a member of a group the owner doesn’t like or finds offensive or immoral and which is protected under civil rights statutes. That is a violation of the law. [HuffPo]

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Kentucky Bourbon’s Getting Shafted By The EU, Thanks To Republican Stupidity, Beginning Today

Thousands of years ago, humans set up camp in the Daniel Boone National Forest. They made fires, cooked meals and made tools — then they left. Now, EKU students, in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service, are retracing their steps. [H-L]

Rudy Giuliani says FBI agents interviewed him in his room at the Trump International Hotel earlier this year regarding his 2016 remarks predicting a “surprise” in the closing days of the presidential race that would benefit then-Republican nominee Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

Former Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino “forced open doors into his long-standing pattern and practice of inappropriate behavior” with his lawsuit against the university, attorneys for the University of Louisville Athletic Association said Monday. [C-J/AKN]

This is still hilarious – I don’t care how badly the guy got his ass beat. A federal judge on Friday sentenced a Kentucky man to 30 days in prison for assaulting U.S. Senator Rand Paul in an attack last November that left the politician with several broken ribs, prosecutors said. [Reuters]

Salisa Luster Harrison told police that she lay in her apartment for two days, beaten, bruised and unconscious, after being raped in 2008. In the days and weeks that followed, Harrison expected her rapist to be brought to justice. Ten years later, she’s still waiting. [WFPL]

ProPublica has obtained audio from inside a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, in which children can be heard wailing as an agent jokes, “We have an orchestra here.” [ProPublica]

Throwback to Matt Bevin and the Republicans trying to kill this important institution. The Morehead News has determined that a proposed $25,000 grant from the Morehead Tourism Commission apparently is the final piece of a local funding package to keep Morehead State University’s Kentucky Folk Art Center operating for at least another year. [The Morehead News]

One day in late May 2016, Roger Stone — the political dark sorcerer and longtime confidant of Donald Trump — slipped into his Jaguar and headed out to meet a man with a Make America Great Again hat and a viscous Russian accent. Stone and Caputo’s interactions with Greenberg mean that at least 11 Trump associates or campaign officials have acknowledged interactions with a Russian during the election season or presidential transition. Those interactions have become public in the year and a half since a Trump spokeswoman said that no one associated with the campaign had communications with Russians or other foreign entities. [WaPo]

A budget that includes $75,000 to help the county operate the animal shelter had first reading heard by the Richmond City Commission last week. [Richmond Register]

A few years ago, the US announcing it would abandon the UN Human Rights Council would have been unthinkable. But today, as most of the world — including the UN human rights chief — recoils in horror at the US government’s treatment of migrant children, “inevitable” feels more accurate. The truth is, this is the right time for the US to step away from its seat at the Human Rights Council, as UN Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley announced Tuesday. Under the Trump administration, the United States cannot perform the role that the world needs it to, marshaling allies — especially the members of the G7 that Trump has alienated — to push forward a clear view of universal values in the council’s resolutions. Right now, we’ve made it difficult to get even Canada on our side. [BuzzFeed]

A $50 per year fee appended to property tax bills will replace phone surcharges to fund the Boyd County 911 system. [Ashland Independent]

The European Union will begin charging import duties of 25 percent on a range of U.S. products on Friday, in response to U.S tariffs imposed on EU steel and aluminum early this month, the European Commission said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

The Lexington parking authority could lose more than $200,000 a year when the University of Kentucky takes control of all or parts of more than a dozen streets in coming years as part of a swap that would give the city more than 250 acres of land for economic development. [H-L]

Actor George Takei, who was sent to a Japanese prison camp with his family during World War II, said immigrant detention centers that separate migrant children from their parents are worse than what he experienced. [HuffPo]

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This Tim Longmeyer Mess Is Bananas

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Denmark’s tax agency seeks to recover $41 million in allegedly fraudulent tax refunds paid to several Central Kentucky-based pension plans and their representatives. [H-L]

The Trump administration separated nearly 2,000 immigrant children from parents or guardians at the border over the span of six weeks, a Department of Homeland Security official said on Friday. [HuffPo]

Kentucky uses an unconstitutional and outdated test to determine whether defendants have the mental competence to get the death penalty, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

Paul Manafort is going to jail. Special counsel Robert Mueller’s office convinced a federal judge on Friday to revoke the bail of Donald Trump’s former campaign chief after he was accused of witness tampering. [NBC News]

Diane Artist Wallace, Miriam (Mim) R. Pride and Ken Koh have been elected to the Berea College Board of Trustees. [Richmond Register]

A cabinet secretary in former Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration said Wednesday that the governor’s chief of staff pressured him to award a lucrative state contract to a company that had helped him raise money. [AP]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court will discuss what the county’s unit-based fee should be to fund the Boyd County 911 Center at its upcoming meeting on Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump’s immigration policies and hurricane response in Puerto Rico are having lethal consequences for nonwhites. This is real American carnage. [USA Today]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear announced Thursday he is suing Walgreens, contending the pharmaceutical company did nothing to stem the rise in opioid addiction despite “having a front-row seat as opioids flooded and devastated our communities.” [Ronnie Ellis]

The New York attorney general is suing Donald Trump’s charitable foundation along with its directors — the President, his sons Eric and Donald Jr. and daughter Ivanka, alleging they violated state and federal charities law. Attorney General Barbara Underwood alleges a pattern of persistent illegal conduct over more than a decade that includes extensive unlawful political coordination with the Trump presidential campaign. [CNN]

Barren County’s comprehensive plan contains information from more than 100 sources compiled in one place to provide an overview of where the county is now and project how it may change and where it is mostly likely to grow over the next two decades. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The former deputy defense secretary for both Barack Obama and Donald Trump is criticizing the substance and framing of Trump’s abrupt cancellation of joint military exercises with South Korea as a “pretty substantial concession” to North Korea—something that both Russia and China could turn to their advantage elsewhere. Although Work was out of the administration at the time, he said that “it was about six months ago that Russia and China floated this idea” for halting the U.S.-South Korean drills. [TDB]

All over Kentucky, you hear the same thing at almost every distillery: hammering. The state’s signature bourbon industry is building like never before, adding distilling capacity and warehouses to age whiskey. The new capital investments topped $1.5 billion in 2016 with no end in sight. Will trade tariffs from the European Union, Canada and other countries become a roadblock for bourbon? It’s hard to say. [H-L]

In the four months since a mass shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school, the number of states with so-called red flag laws has doubled, expanding the ability of courts around the nation to temporarily remove guns from people who are found to be dangerous. [HuffPo]

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Pre-Existing Condition? You’re Screwed

Rick Sanders apparently thinks leaving sidewalk chalk messages in Frankfort is reason to block people from the Capitol. Matt Bevin has been pressuring KSP to retaliate against protestors because he can’t handle criticism. [H-L]

The Twitterverse exploded in a spyware panic after a Dutch journalist in Singapore posted a photo of a press kit freebie of a tiny fan that connects to computers via the USB portal. It was part of a goodie bag for the journalists covering Donald Trump’s meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. [HuffPo]

Adam Edelen is right about health care but dangerously wrong about the work he did as Auditor. There were hundreds of cases he refused to push with Jack Conway. So many, in fact, that his office kept a spreadsheet of cases he was afraid to have the Attorney General investigate. Because of politics. Feel free to dig through the archives here to find those stories. He’s the wrong voice for health care. Or anything, really. He’s wrong for Kentucky and can’t beat Matt Bevin. [C-J/AKN]

Many of us have distinct memories of our own childhood homes. That’s not the case for hundreds of children trapped in Illinois psychiatric hospitals. [ProPublica]

Mark Filburn had a fairly simple message about preventing school shootings for the Interim Joint Education Committee Monday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Diplomacy cannot be dictated by “fits of anger”, French President Emmanuel Macron has warned after the G7 summit in Canada ended in acrimony. [BBC]

The Boyd County Public Library has purchased three acres in Summit and plans to build a branch on the land, director Debbie Cosper said. [Ashland Independent]

After failing to repeal the Affordable Care Act with a Republican-controlled Congress, the Trump administration is seizing on a different strategy for dismantling the law, one fraught with political risk. It is asking a court to throw out major elements, including hugely popular provisions that protect sick people from being denied health insurance or charged higher rates. [NY Times]

After he posed several questions about the proposed budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year for Glasgow government and proposed an amendment that failed with a tie-breaking vote by the mayor, Councilman Jake Dickinson cast the sole vote against the budget as a whole. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s last-minute refusal to sign a joint statement with America’s closest allies was met with shock but also resignation in Europe, where leaders have grudgingly accepted an increasingly isolated U.S. presence on the world stage. [WaPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has formally closed its sexual assault investigation into the late Kentucky state Rep. Dan Johnson, roughly five months after his death. [WFPL]

Hundreds of protesters, including survivors from two of Florida’s deadliest modern mass shootings, staged a rally in Orlando on Monday to call for tougher firearms restrictions two years after a gunman killed 49 people at the Pulse nightclub. [Reuters]

The University of Kentucky is raising tuition for Kentucky students by the smallest amount in more than a decade, but the 2.5 percent increase will push the sticker price for undergraduate students above $12,000 a year. [H-L]

When Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced that the Trump administration would add a question asking about citizenship to the 2020 census in March, he pointed to a Census Bureau analysis saying there was no empirical evidence that adding the question would cause people not to respond to the survey. [HuffPo]

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Get It Together, Marshall County Schools

The former leader of a white supremacist group who once caused outrage with racist remarks at a University of Kentucky event was killed in a crash, and a woman has been charged with his murder, according to court records and media reports. [H-L]

Perhaps no other photo is in more need of a thorough caption than the one released Saturday by the office of German Chancellor Angela Merkel from the Group of Seven’s annual meeting in Quebec. [HuffPo]

Is the Marshall County Board of Education just filled with stupid people or what? The Marshall County School District has banned students from carrying backpacks at the district’s high school and two middle schools. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. authorities are transferring into federal prisons about 1,600 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainees, officials told Reuters on Thursday, in the first large-scale use of federal prisons to hold detainees amid a Trump administration crackdown on people entering the country illegally. [Reuters]

The Concerned Citizens of Estill County, a group formed in 2016, has filed a petition with the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s (EEC) Office of Administrative Hearings. The group seeks a review of the Cabinet’s decision to allow Advanced Disposal Services’ Blue Ridge Landfill to leave more than 1,000 tons of radioactive waste in the Estill County landfill location. [Richmond Register]

Despite a lengthy record of safety violations, the University of California will continue its 75-year legacy of running Los Alamos National Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration announced Friday. [ProPublica]

Opponents of a 3 percent utility tax in the Greenup County School District are circulating petitions in an effort to get the levy recalled by voters. [Ashland Independent]

White House officials have homed in on Donald Trump’s Washington transition headquarters as a likely location where chief of staff John Kelly’s personal cellphone could have been compromised in late 2016, two U.S. officials familiar with the matter said. [Politico]

Morehead State University’s Board of Regents has approved a new operating budget, extended the contract of President Jay Morgan and voted to demolish Butler Hall. [The Morehead News]

Striking a note for transparency, a federal judge ruled on Friday that Donald Trump and his longtime personal lawyer, Michael D. Cohen, cannot proceed in total secrecy as they weigh in on the final stages of a laborious review of a huge trove of materials seized from Mr. Cohen during a series of raids by the authorities in April. [NY Times]

Stacey Thomas, assistant principal of Clinton County High School, was named the new principal of Barren County Middle School during an announcement Friday in the BCMS media center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Frank Kameny was furious that he’d been fired from his government job because he was gay. So he appealed to the nation’s highest court. [WaPo]

In response to a scathing report from Kentucky’s state auditor, the credit rating agency S&P Global withdrew its rating for the largest local government in Eastern Kentucky, making it “nearly impossible” for Pike County to borrow money. [H-L]

Just two years after working to put Donald Trump in the White House, Russian leader Vladimir Putin is now getting help from Trump to achieve foreign policy objectives that Russia has sought for years. [HuffPo]

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Woo, Another School District Scandal

A woman who worked as payroll manager in a Kentucky school district says officials want to get rid of her because she’s a whistleblower who complained about employees abusing a new time-clock system. [H-L]

Over 4,600 people died in Puerto Rico during the aftermath of Hurricane Maria ― more than 70 times the official death toll ― according to a new Harvard study released Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Two Kentucky district court judges illegally refused to let motorists participate in the Jefferson County attorney’s traffic school, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said in affirming a lower court ruling. The court in a 3-0 ruling Friday upheld an opinion by Jefferson Circuit Judge McKay Chauvin that District Judges Sean Delahanty and Stephanie Pearce Burke improperly blocked alleged traffic scofflaws from Drive Safe Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

How does one “lose” almost 1,500 children? Last month, Steven Wagner, the acting assistant secretary of the administration for children and families (ACF), announced at a Senate hearing that the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement — which is to say, an office he oversees — was “unable to determine with certainty the whereabouts of 1,475 children between October and December.” [ThinkProgress]

Almost all of northeast Kentucky’s top school officials earn six-figure salaries, but for almost all of them their salaries are lower than the state average. [Ashland Independent]

After the landmark nuclear agreement of 2015, hundreds of European, Asian and even American companies rushed to enter Iran’s largely untapped market of 80 million people, assured by the United States and the other signatories that their investments would be safe for at least a decade. [ NY Times]

A former Morehead State University recreation center may just be Rowan County’s “newest” if Morehead City Council has its way and it’s not too much of a burden on taxpayers. [The Morehead News]

The gun-control group Giffords has released a short documentary on students affected by shootings — two students from Parkland, Fla., and a Chicago teenager whose brother was killed. [WaPo]

This, like all things Matt Bevin touches, will be a disaster. Derrick Ramsey will be calling the signals for the Kentucky Cabinet for Education and Workforce Development. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new study published Tuesday estimates that Hurricane Maria killed over 5,000 people after striking Puerto Rico last September. That’s more than 75 times higher than the island’s previous official count, and if widely accepted would cement the storm as one of the most deadly natural disasters to ever affect US citizens. [Mother Jones]

The Jefferson County School board will appeal the state education department’s recommendation for a takeover of the district. [WFPL]

At a White House meeting last winter, leaders of the F.B.I. and the Justice Department made an urgent appeal to John F. Kelly, the White House chief of staff, to side with them against Republicans in Congress who were pressing for information about the Russia investigation that would compromise confidential sources. [More NY Times]

A Kentucky truck stop was evacuated Sunday after what was apparently a pipe bomb was found in a trash can, according to Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Anti-trust nerds, consumer advocates and open internet campaigners and have been fighting to break up Facebook for years. But in their crusade against the social network’s online monopoly, the usual suspects have enlisted a growing coalition of allies: artists and progressive Muslim and Jewish activists. [HuffPo]

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