Kentucky Republicans: Apparently Way Less Capable Than Kentucky Democrats – And You KNOW That’s Saying Something

If there’s one big question lingering here as a springtime lull takes hold of the Kentucky Capitol, it’s this: is the legislature going to overhaul the state’s tax code in a special legislative session this year? Leaders of the House and Senate are shrugging. [H-L]

Miss Lindsey Graham (R-Gurl.) said Tuesday that if “fully implemented,” Donald Trump’s proposed cuts to State Department funding would lead to “a lot of BENGHAAAAAAAAAAAAZI situations.” [HuffPo]

Kentucky needs to boost its pension funding about $700 million a year to responsibly tackle its crisis, state budget director John Chilton said Monday. [C-J/AKN]

PPL Corp. shareholders on Wednesday became what’s believed to be the first group of electric utility investors in the nation to successfully urge management to publish a report explaining how new climate change policies will affect the company’s bottom line. During the Allentown-based utility’s annual shareholder meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, more than 50 percent of shareholders voted in favor of a nonbinding proposal that asks PPL management to publish “an assessment of impact” that public policy changes and technological advances related to the 2016 Paris Agreement will have on the company’s portfolio. [Click this Clicky]

Richmond resident and 21-year-old Eastern Kentucky University student Drake Southwell was a recipient of the free and reduced lunch program all throughout grade school. [Richmond Register]

Allowing a photographer from the Russian state media into the Oval Office was an act of breathtaking recklessness. Or just straight-up corruption and treason. [Politico]

Greenup County schools will get less state money next year because of a dip in enrollment, but the funding cut won’t be enough to seriously hamper district operations, administrators said Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Senate Republicans are under mounting pressure to pass an ObamaCare repeal-and-replace bill before the congressional recess in August. While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Garbage) is wary of committing to a specific deadline after the House struggled to pass a bill, the White House wants the upper chamber to hit the gas. [The Hill]

Rowan County Fiscal Court officially approved the 2016-17 operating budget last week; however, it didn’t pass with all four magistrates agreeing. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump’s proposals to slash federal aid to the poor, the sick and people living in rural areas reflect conservatives’ demands for a smaller federal government but target many of the very people who voted for him last November. [Reuters]

The Chief Justice of Kentucky’s Supreme Court denied a local rule proposed by a Family Court Judge who does not wish to preside over adoption cases involving homosexuals because of “both procedural and substantive deficiencies.” [Ronnie Ellis]

The Faux News brand of Republicans – the Scott Jennings of the world who buy into this bullshit – are just disgusting. [WaPo]

A Tennessee man says he spent five years in jail for a murder he did not commit because a state police detective and a former Kentucky sheriff lied to protect a man who was related to the detective and had bribed the sheriff. [H-L]

“People think he’s a little crazy,” said Benedetta Alabardi, a pharmacist whose store sits a few hundred yards from St. Peter’s Square. “The first impression is that he’s crazy and dangerous,” said Orasti Gionti, a project manager for a telecommunications consulting company, who allowed for the possibility that Trump’s outrageous statements were an act. “Maybe he’s tricky.” [HuffPo]

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Republicans Making Opioid Mess Worse

Attorney General Andy Beshear is exploring whether he has the authority to investigate details surrounding the purchase of a Jefferson County house where Gov. Matt Bevin’s family now lives. [H-L]

The Justice Department has appointed Robert S. Mueller III, the former F.B.I. director, to serve as a special counsel to oversee its investigation into Russian meddling in the election, Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein announced on Wednesday. [NY Times]

When Alice Lloyd made her way by horse and buggy to the mountains of Eastern Kentucky a century ago, doctors had said the sickly New Englander had little time to live. She was looking for a place with a warmer climate that might ease her health problems. Instead, she found her life’s purpose. [More H-L]

In a sweeping foreign policy address on Sunday, Chinese President Xi Jinping promised to invest in clean energy, build scientific coalitions, and support other countries’ efforts to adapt to climate change. [HuffPo]

The artwork is obviously offensive to many and it was a dumb move on the part of Steve Wilson and crew. But there have probably worse issues surrounding 21c through the past few years that no one’s gotten up in arms about. From methed out queens riding around on somebody’s Segway to… well… have you ever been? It’s just… Jesus H. [C-J/AKN]

The Trump administration called for tougher charges and longer prison time for criminals in a move to return to strict enforcement of federal sentencing rules, according to a memo the U.S. Department of Justice released on Friday. [Reuters]

In Appalachian states hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, the tough-on-crime policy announced Friday by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions runs counter to a recent emphasis on treatment and less prison time for low-level drug offenders. [Richmond Register]

Veterans of White House scandals from Watergate to Plamegate have an important message for Team Trump: It’s time to think about lawyering up. [Politico]

Honeylore Fields is in the process of decorating her new home. The house is a three bedroom, one bath with hardwood floors, and when she talks about it, she can hardly contain her excitement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

An investigation of Indiana’s school voucher program found that private schools are turning away special education students. [NPR]

Ever wondered what kind of slick bullshit people in Eastern Kentucky try to pull when they’ve got more money than the rest of the town? Here’s a good look. [The Morehead News]

The Environmental Protection Agency has dismissed at least five members of a major scientific review board, the latest signal of what critics call a campaign by the Trump administration to shrink the agency’s regulatory reach by reducing the role of academic research. [More NY Times]

Along a back wall in the Kentucky Exposition Center’s spacious south wing, 231 archery targets are lined up end to end. Competitors are lined up, too, aiming for the bull’s-eye and striving for a perfect 300 score. [WFPL]

Across Washington, Trump’s allies have been buzzing about the staff’s competence as well as the president’s state of mind. One GOP figure close to the White House mused privately about whether Trump was “in the grip of some kind of paranoid delusion.” [WaPo]

This is what happens when you let literal idiots appoint justices to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court says a Kentucky nursing home can require the families of two former residents to pursue claims against the home outside of court. [H-L]

Michael T. Flynn told Trump’s transition team weeks before the inauguration that he was under federal investigation for secretly working as a paid lobbyist for Turkey during the campaign, according to two people familiar with the case. [Even More NY Times]

Donald Trump might hate Alec Baldwin’s impression of him, but it sounds like at least one member of his cabinet thinks it’s great. The “Saturday Night Live” regular has revealed in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter that an unnamed cabinet member told him at a New York City restaurant that his impression of the president was spot-on. [HuffPo]

One of the Trump administration’s first decisions about the fight against the Islamic State was made by Michael Flynn weeks before he was fired – and it conformed to the wishes of Turkey, whose interests, unbeknownst to anyone in Washington, he’d been paid more than $500,000 to represent. [McClatchy]

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One Of The Dumbest People On Earth

Here’s your probably-going-to-get-impeached president attempting to take credit for the American economy:



If you’re a New Naz… New Republican – the shysters who have taken over the Republican Party of Kentucky – remember that you own this guy and all of his insanity. When his administration falls, you’ll be blamed.

McConnell Is Now Apparently Complicit

Mitch McConnell is now complicit in the Trump-Russia shenanigans. He yesterday rejected calls for a special prosector on the floor of the U.S. Senate. [CNN]

A mural at a Western Kentucky elementary school depicting two black children tending a garden while a tall white man plays a violin has upset some residents. [H-L]

Former President Barack Obama warned Donald Trump about hiring retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn during a meeting in November 2016, NBC and CNN reported Monday. [HuffPo]

A Louisville lawyer who heads the local chapter of the Federalist Society – a conservative legal group that has tried to move the national debate on gun rights and campaign finance to the right – will be nominated by Donald Trump to serve on the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals. [C-J/AKN]

One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them. [ProPublica]

Federal lawmakers are moving ahead with a new approach to health care that includes changing the way insurers cover pre-existing health conditions. But the American Health Care Act that House Republicans voted to advance last week could bring back a program with which some Kentuckians may be familiar: high-risk pool health insurance. Until 2013, these high-risk pools operated in Kentucky and other states. And if the provisions of the final bill allow states to do away with coverage for pre-existing health conditions — which were made possible under President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act — they could be coming back. [WFPL]

From the moment the Republican-controlled House of Representatives approved a plan to overhaul the health care system, an onslaught of opposition to the bill has been focused on a single, compact term: pre-existing conditions. [NY Times]

“These are our neighbors needing help and our community partners who are in the trenches every day trying to meet the needs of kids and families,” said Kim Henderson, Gateway regional director. Henderson is one of fewer than 10 staff at Mountain Haven Emergency Shelter, which held its grand opening ribbon cutting ceremony on Friday. [The Morehead News]

When the state of Arkansas announced plans to carry out eight executions in an 11-day period in April, it drew intense international scrutiny that flared until well after the final lethal injection in the series at the end of the month. In part, this attention was fueled by the explanation, offered by state officials, that the timetable was necessary because the supply of one of the state’s lethal drugs was about to expire and authorities had to carry out death penalties for eight men convicted of murder before then. [WaPo]

The family court judge for Barren and Metcalfe counties who objects to presiding over adoption cases involving homosexual adoptive parents now concedes his general order recusing himself from all such cases is prohibited by the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Trump administration is so far ignoring pleas from both on and off Capitol Hill to denounce the suspected Russian-backed digital assault that appeared aimed to tilt Sunday’s French presidential election toward nationalist candidate Marine Le Pen. [Politico]

Wondering how to stick it to an already impoverished community of people? Here you go. This fiscal year, the Madison Fiscal Court is contributing $1.75 million in supplemental funds to operate the chronically overcrowded county detention center. Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor believes the county could recover nearly $790,000 of that if it charged inmates a daily $10 fee, in addition to the $20 booking fee it already charges. [Richmond Register]

Barely two days into crafting a new bill to roll back Obamacare, U.S. Senate Republicans were already on the defensive on Tuesday over the absence of any women in their core working group. [Reuters]

The attempted burglary of a statistics exam Tuesday by two University of Kentucky students wasn’t the first time someone had the idea. A similar case 30 years ago turned into one of the biggest cheating cases in UK history. [H-L]

Author Stephen King has been delivering chills for more than four decades with horror masterpieces such as “It,” “The Shining” and “’Salem’s Lot.” But King now believes there’s something more terrifying than anything he’s ever cooked up, and it’s living in the White House. [HuffPo]

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Bevin In Charge = $113 Million Shortfall

A federal appeals court has reinstated a claim for damages against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples during the summer of 2015. [John Cheves]

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is so terrible at leadership that Kentucky’s going under again. Kentucky’s budget director is predicting the state will suffer a $113 million revenue shortfall when the state’s fiscal year ends June 30. [C-J/AKN]

The burden of substance abuse disorders can fall heavily on the families and friends of those who battle addictions. But society also pays a great deal through increased crime. Treatment programs can reduce those costs. [NY Times]

Surprise! The fat, old, white racists of the Bowling Green Daily News are still panicking over President Barack Obama and are trying to suggest he’s still gonna take yer guns. It’s this special brand of stupid that keeps Kentucky in the dark ages. [BGDN]

Trump on Tuesday called for a “good shutdown” in September to fix the “mess” in government. [The Hill]

Mary Beth Burkes lives in Buchanan County, Va., a depressed coal-mining region where 1 in 4 families lives in poverty and where her autistic son gets extra help in the after-school program at his school. [WFPL]

A pro-Donald Trump biker gang’s physical handling of protesters at a weekend rally could add to the president’s legal woes, with one attendee considering a fresh lawsuit as protesters already suing over violence at rallies last year plan to cite the recent events as proof of an ongoing pattern. A federal judge late last month ruled that Trump’s calls of “get ’em out of here!” may have constituted “incitement to riot” at a March 2016 rally in Louisville, Kentucky, at which three protesters allege in a lawsuit they were assaulted by Trump supporters. [Politico]

The sequel to a successful spy film will focus heavily on bourbon distilling, and Louisville-based Brown-Forman Corp. is taking advantage of the exposure. [Business First]

A Texas police department has changed a key detail in the shooting of an unarmed black teenager, amid mounting calls for the officer to be arrested. [BBC]

The University of Kentucky announced on Monday afternoon that Commonwealth Stadium will become Kroger Field. [WKYT]

African-Americans are generally living longer than in 2000, but health disparities mean they are still more likely to die at a younger age on average than whites, a federal study showed on Tuesday. [Reuters]

A federal judge has ruled that Lexington cannot enforce a recently passed ordinance that restricts where advertising and other unsolicited printed materials can be delivered. [H-L]

Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to President Donald Trump who generated controversy for his alleged ties to a Nazi-aligned group, is expected to accept a new role soon outside of the White House, according to multiple reports. [HuffPo]

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We’re Not Even 100 Days In Yet…

The University of Kentucky has received $11.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to finance a new center that studies the links between obesity and cancer. [Linda Blackford]

Whiny little Mitch, indeed. Kentuckians have known this for years but it’s fun to watch the rest of the world find out just what a butthurt little baby these people are. [HuffPo]

A researcher at the University of Louisville is stepping up her study into whether coal ash from power plants may be making children in Louisville sick with a new study backed by federal research dollars. [C-J/AKN]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Monday that it filed a lawsuit against Weltman, Weinberg & Reis, accusing the debt collection firm of falsely representing in millions of collection letters that attorneys were involved in collection for overdue accounts. The firm collects on overdue credit card, installment loans, mortgage loans, and student loans debt nationwide, but only files lawsuit in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. [Consumerist]

At 8:36 p.m. Monday night, Glasgow Police Chief Guy Howie released information on the woman who was found dead Monday morning on the rooftop of a building located on the west side of Glasgow’s public square. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Lost amid the uproar over the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants is a change coming to the legal immigration system that’s expected to be costly for both U.S. companies and the government itself. [ProPublica]

New preschool and vocational school buildings are at the top of a construction priority list the Boyd County Board of Education is expected to adopt Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump has congratulated Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on his victory in Sunday’s referendum that gave him sweeping new powers. The US president’s phone call contrasts with European concern that the result – 51.4% in favour of the changes – has exposed deep splits in Turkish society. [BBC]

With a meeting on his proposal for a new, comprehensive approach to the drug epidemic only a week away, Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor got the opportunity to present his ideas directly to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell as he met Monday with local leaders. [Richmond Register]

If this doesn’t scare the crap out of you, nothing will. How does the surge in drug overdoses compare with other causes of death in the U.S.? [NY Times]

In the first project of its kind, a Kentucky coal company is partnering with a global renewable energy giant to explore putting a major solar installation on a former mountaintop removal coal mine. [WFPL]

Racism motivated Trump voters more than authoritarianism. Which surprises absolutely no one who isn’t in denial. [WaPo]

Knox County and Barbourville Independent schools were closed Tuesday after a threat was called in Monday night to a West Coast police agency, according to a statement from the school system. [H-L]

Donald Trump, like most New Republican Nazis, doesn’t actually know who is running North Korea. [HuffPo]

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