Your Friday Evening Dept. Of Derp

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Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continued to withhold marriage licenses from local residents Thursday, a day after a federal appeals court upheld an order telling her to end her protest. [H-L]

McDonald’s, Burger King and every other company that relies on a franchise business model just suffered the legal setback they’ve been fearing for years. [HuffPo]

As West Africa’s Ebola epidemic dissipates, Fort Campbell’s 101st Airborne Division is being recognized for its role in helping fight an outbreak that has killed more than 11,280 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. [C-J/AKN]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

The Glasgow City Council Public Safety Committee has decided on its recommendations for changes to the city’s animal welfare ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Everything that is happening in the solar industry is happening in Nevada right now. [ThinkProgress]

Jack Conway, the Democratic candidate for governor, and his Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, don’t much like each other. [Ronnie Ellis]

Garbage has become an unlikely battleground in the abortion debate, as anti-abortion groups seek evidence of privacy violations in clinics’ trash. [ProPublica]

With several changes coming to The Register beginning in Sept. 1, readers and subscribers have questions and concerns. The staff of The Register would like to help answer those questions with an online Q&A. [Richmond Register]

Planned Parenthood has paid forensic experts to comb through undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists, and their report finds significant distortions and misleading edits. [NPR]

Thousands of Kentuckians went to the Kentucky State Capitol on Saturday to show support for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision to stop issuing marriage licenses after the U. S. Supreme Court recognized same-sex marriage. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama on Thursday heralded the progress New Orleans has made rebuilding since Hurricane Katrina battered the area 10 years ago but said more needed to be done to overcome poverty and inequality. [Reuters]

Tanya Meeks wears a small silver urn on a necklace. On this day, it rested on a bright orange T-shirt with “Stop Heroin” printed across the front, and rubber bands hung from her wrist with hashtags that mirrored the shirt’s slogan. [H-L]

Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Ugh, We Can’t Even With This Today

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Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

Can a high-fat diet lead to breast cancer in obese women? University of Kentucky researchers hope to help answer that question by studying the mechanisms behind the link between obesity and breast cancer. One of those researchers, Fredrick Onono, recently received a $750,000 grant from the National Cancer Institute for the work. [C-J/AKN]

As the U.S. government’s budget deficit has declined, so has anxiety about it in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail, but one family and the Washington “deficit hawk” community it bankrolls are unfazed. [Reuters]

What organizers believe will be the largest-ever gathering of Appalachian writers will take place Sept. 9-10 at Berea College. The Appalachian Symposium will include two days of public conversations focusing on the state of the region’s literature and will feature keynote addresses by famed feminist author and activist bell hooks as well as Pulitzer Prize finalist Maurice Manning. [Richmond Register]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

Two inebriated men were injured after being struck in the head by a hatchet-wielding man from Lexington around midnight Saturday in Central Park, according to the Ashland Police Department. [Ashland Independent]

People of all ages — not just the elderly — are more at risk of death and emergency room visits as the earth warms, a recent study has found. [ThinkProgress]

An opinion in writing from Glasgow’s city attorney affirmed the Glasgow Management Control Board’s interpretation of documents that say the director of the city’s 911 dispatch center has supervision, control and disciplinary authority over all the center’s employees – even the ones whose salaries and benefits are provided by a different agency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Stock prices took another beating Tuesday, with all major stock measures falling. Two closely followed market indicators, the Dow Jones industrial average and the S&P 500, each fell roughly 1.3 percent, despite opening the day with big gains.

An Eastern Kentucky resident says he’ll sue the state and federal government next month over coal mining permits he says were illegally issued. [WFPL]

US scientists have identified the chemicals responsible for the mosquito-repelling activity of sweetgrass, a plant traditionally used by some Native Americans to fend off the bugs. [BBC]

Let’s just say it: Jean-Marie is dumb as hell. State Rep. Ryan Quarles, the Republican nominee for state agriculture commissioner, alleged Thursday that the father of his Democratic opponent, Jean-Marie Lawson Spann, has texted answers to her during their debates and forums. [H-L]

Andy Parker, the father of slain WDBJ journalist Alison Parker, is demanding that politicians restrict access to firearms, saying he will personally become a crusader for this issue if need be. [HuffPo]

No Puppies & Rainbows Here Today

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The Kentucky Kernel, the University of Kentucky’s independent campus newspaper, announced Monday that it will cut production of the print newspaper from five days a week to two in an effort to put more emphasis on its online products. [H-L]

This is just… sick. Two beloved Virginia journalists were shot and killed Wednesday morning when a gunman opened fire in a shocking moment caught on live television. [HuffPo]

A wildlife research organization that studies the expanding range of cougars in North America has come to a different conclusion from the one offered by state authorities on how an ill-fated mountain lion made its way into Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s a real ruh ro moment for a few legislators… The chief executive of Rentboy.com and six employees running the website were arrested Tuesday and charged with promoting prostitution under the federal Travel Act. [The Hill]

The high fence surrounding a Purdue University research farm here was installed to keep out pesky deer, but this summer it served a second purpose: Keeping federal drug agents at bay. The research farm, 10 miles south of Purdue’s West Lafayette campus, is home to the first legally grown industrial hemp crop in Indiana in decades. [News & Tribune]

Often maligned for speaking too frankly, Vice President Joe Biden’s reputation for shooting from the lip might be one of his biggest weapons if he does decide to run against Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. [Reuters]

Three Kentuckians made Modern Healthcare’s “100 Most Influential People in Healthcare” list. [Business First]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo will propose a constitutional amendment that would allow as many as seven casinos to open in Kentucky, with tax revenue from the businesses dedicated to public education, boosting the racing industry and shoring up the state’s ailing retirement system. [WFPL]

By 2050, an area of forests the size of India is set to be wiped off the planet if humans continue on their current path of deforestation, according to a new report. That’s bad news for the creatures that depend on these forest ecosystems for survival, but it’s also bad news for the climate, as the loss of these forests will release more than 100 gigatons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. [ThinkProgress]

Only the Madison County School Board and the fiscal court as well as the cities of Richmond and Berea, have not set property tax rates for 2015. [Richmond Register]

NPR’S Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, managing director and chief economist at Manulife, about how the interest rate hike will affect mortgages, auto and student loans, and consumer behavior. [NPR]

Visitors entering the Georgetown Police Department’s new $5 million headquarters on Bourbon Street might notice two details. [H-L]

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest renewed the Obama administration’s call for Congress to take action on gun control after a gunman shot and killed a reporter and cameraman during a live television broadcast on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Watching Kim Davis Lose Is A Relief

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The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has denied a request from Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to stay a federal injunction that called on her to provide marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [C-J/AKN]

The secretly recorded videos of Planned Parenthood officials discussing how fetal tissue may be used for medical research spurred Republican governors in several states to announce a cutoff of Medicaid funds to the group’s clinics. This certainly won’t make Matt Bevin and other opportunist buttcramps happy. [LA Times]

The Madison Fiscal Court voted Tuesday to join the county school and library boards in opposing Eastern Kentucky University’s effort to exempt from property taxes the privately owned Grand Campus residential complex it leases. [Richmond Register]

A small group of county clerks in Kentucky have said that they will defy the Supreme Court’s decision on marriage equality and refuse to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. One of them, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, recently lost her case in federal court and is likely to lose on appeal. [Right Wing Watch]

Big Run Landfill supporters made their strongest effort yet to speak up for jobs at the waste facility that has been at the center of controversy in Boyd County for more than a year. About 500 attended Tuesday’s public hearing with the Department of Environmental Protection to record comments regarding the site’s current permit renewal application being deliberated upon by the state. [Ashland Independent]

The nation’s second-most powerful court handed a victory to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Tuesday, dismissing a challenge to a five-year-old agency rule that puts restrictions on investment advisers’ contributions to political campaigns. [The Hill]

Wondering just how confused and scared people in Eastern Kentucky happen to be when it comes to the gays? The SCOTUS is taking away all their freedumbs. [The Morehead News]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

After the Charleston, S.C, church shootings, Kentucky banned the sale of Confederate flag merchandise at its state fair next year. Vendors are under pressure not to sell it at this year’s fair. [NPR]

A state ethics panel has filed two additional charges of misconduct against Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs, who has been suspended while awaiting a hearing. The new charges allege that Combs presided over a number of cases involving EQT Production Co. but failed to properly disclose that he has a financial relationship with the company. [H-L]

How did the four planets known as gas and ice giants form in the early solar system? The latest theory on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune just received a big boost from a new computer modeling study. [HuffPo]

What?! Tax Cuts Are Expensive?! Why…

A group that works against government endorsement of religion has renewed a complaint about prayers before Bell County High School home football games. [H-L]

If Vice President Joe Biden decides to jump into the presidential race, his decision will be driven, he has said in recent conversations, by a belief that Hillary Clinton’s background won’t allow her to be a credible messenger when it comes to income inequality, which Biden sees as a defining issue. [HuffPo]

An assistant commonwealth’s attorney resigned Monday, months after a circuit court judge dismissed one of his cases as a sanction for “deliberately” withholding evidence. [C-J/AKN]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… German scientists have found an unusually long trail of footprints from a 30-tonne dinosaur in an abandoned quarry in Lower Saxony, a discovery they think could be around 145 million years old. [Reuters]

The Perry County Board of Education had a special called board meeting on August 13. The primary reason for the meeting was the consideration and approval of the of the 2015-2016 tax rates. [Hazard Herald]

A new probe that sticks to blood clots so they can be seen in a PET scan has proved successful in rats – and will be tested in humans later this year, according to researchers in the US. [BBC]

Attorneys who successfully challenged Kentucky’s ban on same-sex marriage have submitted a bill for more than $2 million in legal fees, court costs and related expenses. The state of Kentucky, as the losing party in the case, gets stuck with the tab under federal civil-rights law. [Ashland Independent]

A deal struck between drugmakers AbbVie and United Therapeutics Wednesday set a record price for a voucher that can be redeemed for a fast-track review of a new medicine by the Food and Drug Administration. [NPR]

As members of the Republican Party of Kentucky debated on Saturday whether to approve a rule change creating a presidential caucus in March — at Sen. Rand Paul’s request — one of the biggest selling points was that the caucus would help build the party. [WFPL]

The director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO), who was appointed by GOP lawmakers earlier this year, said Tuesday that tax cuts don’t pay for themselves. [The Hill]

Sen. Mitch McConnell spoke to several Tuesday in Grayson County about the biggest issues in Washington right now. [WBKO]

There are signs that Jeb Bush’s fundraising juggernaut is losing some momentum, after banking a stunning $120 million for his campaign and super PAC in the first half of the year. [Politico]

Nothing but wasted time and money. The city of Somerset will drop a lawsuit challenging the state auditor’s authority to do special examinations of cities, Mayor Eddie Girdler announced Monday. [H-L]

President Barack Obama spoke candidly about his critics at a fundraising event on Monday evening. [HuffPo]

JCPS Set Great Example For Rest Of KY

It wasn’t that long ago that U.S. Sen. Rand Paul declared that he had to win the early-voting state of New Hampshire to gain the momentum that would carry him to the Republican presidential nomination. [H-L]

Cat Kim, a recent graduate from Columbia Law School, had two missions this summer. One was studying for and taking the California bar exam. The other was preparing cases for immigrant women and children in Texas detention centers who, without the help of people like her, could be deported. [HuffPo]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump blasted hedge fund managers on Sunday as mere “paper pushers” who he said were “getting away with murder” by not paying their fair share of taxes. [Reuters]

Big Blue fans of the University of Kentucky athletic teams had things to talk about besides asking “How about them ‘Cats?” Monday morning. [Ronnie Ellis]

The tip came in at about 7 p.m. on Monday, July 27. It was an email from a woman named Patricia Cronan, a banker who lived next door to a group home in Long Beach, California. She said the home, run by a nonprofit called Bayfront Youth & Family Services, seemed to be in a perpetual state of chaos. [ProPublica]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Earlier this year, social work student Coraly León arrived at her research assistant job at the University of Puerto Rico to find her salary abruptly cut in half due to budget cuts. [ThinkProgress]

Glasgow City Council took the final step at its regular meeting Monday evening in the selection of the city’s next police chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Confusion over the types of coal being burned in Chinese power stations has caused a significant overestimation of the country’s carbon emissions. [BBC]

Evarts City Council decided not to raise taxes saying “residents are struggling with a downturn in the economy and now is not the time to add to their burden.” [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

There’s A Literal Stink In Bullitt County

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A group of University of Kentucky trustees upheld the proposed revocation of a longtime surgeon’s clinical privileges Monday but modified the decision to allow him access to campus as a tenured professor. [H-L]

Fast-food workers who are hoping to raise the minimum wage will find an ally in the Obama White House this week, with Labor Secretary Tom Perez traveling to Detroit on Tuesday to show his solidarity with the so-called Fight for $15. [HuffPo]

The owner of a failed private wastewater treatment plant that serves more than 700 homes in Bullitt County filed papers late Friday to walk away from the system that’s caused raw sewage to flow into a tributary of popular Floyds Fork for 17 months since a massive tank breakdown. [C-J/AKN]

A U.S. appeals court said the Federal Trade Commission has authority to regulate corporate cybersecurity, and may pursue a lawsuit accusing hotel operator Wyndham Worldwide Corp of failing to properly safeguard consumers’ information. [Reuters]

Berea Mayor Steve Connelly called for changes in city personnel policy after several police officers questioned the fairness of recent salary increases. At the Berea City Council meeting Tuesday, Connelly proposed revising the procedure for employee evaluation and awarding raises. [Richmond Register]

It’s now or never for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. That appears to be the view of his wealthy super-PAC backers, who are spending fast and hard to keep Christie in contention for the Republican presidential nomination. [The Hill]

A company offered a proposal to Barren County Fiscal Court on Tuesday to allow it to do a free evaluation of the county’s energy efficiency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There’s an old saying in journalism that there are no new stories, everything’s been done before, ProPublica’s Joe Sexton says. But when he came across “The Outlaw Ocean,” investigative reporter Ian Urbina’s latest series for The New York Times, he couldn’t help but be “genuinely jealous” of the intriguing, outrageous world he uncovered. [ProPublica]

An Ashland man who until recently lived in Medellin, Colombia, is among defendants accused of selling millions of dollars worth of untaxed cigarettes from a Russell storefront. David White, who is free on bond and living with a friend in Ashland pending his January trial date, posted information about his arrest and alleged part in the cigarette scheme on Facebook and spoke on Friday to a reporter from The Independent. [Ashland Independent]

Scientists in the US have found a way to take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and make carbon nanofibres, a valuable manufacturing material. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court agreed Tuesday to an inter-local agreement with the City of Morehead to form a city-county recreation commission. [The Morehead News]

After her two leading rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination became targets of the Black Lives Matter movement, Hillary Clinton came armed with policy arguments when she met with members of the African-American activist group last week. [Mother Jones]

Mathieux Saint Fleur has been virtually blind for two decades. In less than 24 hours, he will see again. [H-L]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]