Political Future? What? How bout the political past

Joe Biesk had a great story yesterday about Ernie Fletcher’s political future. The real meat of the story, though, is Ernie’s legacy. Rather, the events forever burned into memory that either cracked us up or horrified the world.

The “merit fiasco,” Hunter Bates inability to run for office because he wasn’t a Kentuckian, the U.S. Capitol airplane scare during Saint Ronnie’s funeral, the state health insurance disaster that nearly led to a massive strike, and his desire to bust up every union in the state with anti-union legislation. My, what an interesting legacy Ernest Lee leaves. He’ll never be forgotten.

Check it all out here.

Allison Patrick: Used Car Saleswoman

Reading conservative blogs pays off. For real.

From Brett Hall:

Allie Patrick, the 22 year-old fiancée of Lieutenant Governor-elect Dan Mongiardo, is running in an online contest for a job selling used automobiles on Lexington TV. In her show audition today, Patrick appeared on Courtesy Pontiac-Acura’s Courtesy on Wheels show on WDKY TV, Lexington’s FOX affiliate. The show features host Dan Glass, along with a female hostess, hawking used cars that roll by in front of viewers. The auto dealership is conducting an online poll for a new show hostess in conjunction with audition appearances by several contestants.

Got that? This is what we have to look forward to. Four years (or until Dan Mongiardo runs for the U.S. Senate in 2010) of Allison Patrick selling using cars on television. Is she an HFH in the making? If Patrick and Mongiardo eventually get married… will she be allowed to remain on the tube? Will she do voice-overs for Insight? Maybe pose with a milk jug or two?

There’s no way this one can stay out of the news for long.

Peep the goods for yourself:



An OMG Moment: David L. Williams for U.S. Senate

Mark Hebert reports that David L. Williams is running for the United States Senate (see filing here) against Mitch McConnell. Williams just lost to Richie Farmer by a billion points in the race for Agriculture Commissioner.

His candidacy was such an embarrassment for the Kentucky Democratic Party that it refused to include him in literature and avoided mentioning his name at public events. What on earth could possibly make Williams think anyone could take him politically seriously?

Stupidity: Conquering Louisville Today, Tomorrow the World!

Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw’s office has known for three years that social security numbers and other sensitive information is readily available via her website. Ready for the picking by everyone (okay, by every thief) on these internets. And she’s done nothing about it.

That’s kind of a big deal.

LEO’s Stephen George takes Holsclaw, a Republican, to task for doing little to remedy the security nightmare on her hands. And we hear from our own sources that Holsclaw has repeatedly said that it’s not a big deal, that it’s already been hashed out, it’s old news, etc. Hoo boy. Wonder if she smells like turnips since she obviously just fell off the truck.

Anyway. Have a read of Stephen’s story this week.

It is at least curious, if not downright alarming, that there are thousands upon thousands of Social Security numbers available for free, through the unsecured Web site of the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office. They are there among scads of notarized documents viewable in handy PDF format, things you’d probably be surprised to learn are actually public record: Your will might be there, for instance, or a mortgage agreement or the deed to your house. Your signature could appear in multiple formats.

Perhaps even more disconcerting, however, is the fact that thousands of perfectly valid Social Security numbers currently being used by actual people show up on pages of search results — there is no need to download an actual document. The numbers are right there, along with names and addresses. They show up only when certain search criteria are selected; however, it is not difficult to imagine a would-be identity thief with a few drops of Internet savvy figuring out how to piece together a name, date of birth, Social Security number, home address and signature.

Click here for the rest…

Jim Gooch: Embarrassment, Should be Ousted

Rep. Jim Gooch needs to resign immediately. If he doesn’t, we’ll spend our own money fielding a primary challenger for the Western Kentucky democrat. Gooch is an example of House Speaker Jody Richards’ failed leadership. He should never have been appointed.

He got his ass handed to him on Good Morning America this weekend. What an embarrassment.

Here are some highlights. Try not to laugh when the host makes him look like an absolute fool. We especially love when he’s called out for personally benefiting from his votes as a coal industry hack.




Don’t forget: You can call Gooch to express your outrage at his stupidity.Who wants to run against him in the primary? Anyone from Hopkins, McLean, Webster or Daviess counties want to step up to the plate? We’ll help you raise money. Shoot me an e-mail if you’re interested.

Finger Pointing on Medco

Let’s point some fingers:

Louisville and the rest of Kentucky lost out on a major new employer because the Kentucky Pharmacy Board flat out failed to move on a regulation that would have made it possible for Medco Health Solutions Inc. to bring 1,300 jobs to the city. Instead, those jobs are going to Indiana, despite the fact that Kentucky’s incentive package was better ($30 million vs. $18.5 million). Pharmacy Board Executive Director Mike Burleson, according to the C-J, “didn’t realize how fast Medco needed the board to act.”

Burleson, appointed to his position in 2004 by Gov. Ernie Fletcher, told the C-J he wanted to protect the safety of patients. That was an extremely weak excuse, in the face of evidence to the contrary, for Kentucky’s slow pace in changing regulations that would have permitted Medco to operate here. Indiana’s board made the changes quickly without controversy.

Fletcher deserves some blame here, too. While Indiana’s Mitch Daniels was personally involved in negotiating with the company, Fletcher never talked with company officials. Expect more evidence of Fletcher gubernatorial incompetence to be made public, given that Fletcher spent the last year of his term fighting for his political life.

The Medco efforts by Kentucky economic development officials, it seems, were exemplary. It was an opportunity that doesn’t come along often, and Kentucky blew it, after a year’s effort, because of the incompetent actions of the Pharmacy Board.

Steve Beshear’s economic development message, during the campaign, was that too many incentives were being given to out-of-state companies, that the state needs to develop more in-state companies. That’s not the right solution, either. Beshear needs to make sure that this kind of mistake doesn’t happen during his watch. It’s a leadership issue. Daniels is a better leader than Fletcher. Indiana won. Kentucky lost. The contest was more important than any college rivalry.

Let’s hope Beshear replaces Burleson as E.D. of the Pharmacy Board, and insists that state government agencies get with the economic development program. When mistakes of this magnitude occur, heads must roll.

Jim Gooch: The Nut that Keeps On Giving

Democratic Rep. Jim Gooch brought his weird in-denial-about-global-warming circus to Frankfort last week. And we’ve all thrown up a little in our mouths as a result. But who thought he was crazier than he seemed a few days ago?

We didn’t talk much about one of Gooch’s “experts” last week, Lord Christopher Monckton, a guy who calls himself a journalist. Monckton has an interesting past and an obscure world view on things like holding insane beliefs about HIV/AIDS. In John Cheves’ Herald-Leader story about Gooch (Nov 15th) we learn a bit about Monckton’s stance:

Lord Christopher Monckton, the 3rd Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, is a British journalist and onetime adviser to then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Monckton generated controversy during the 1980s with his recommendation — which he repeated for lawmakers yesterday — that people diagnosed with HIV or AIDS be locked up for life.

“Twenty years ago we could have stopped this disease from spreading worldwide by treating it just like any other fatal, infectious disease, by making it notifiable, so people who got it were isolated — and in the kindest and nicest way — but isolated so they couldn’t spread it to everybody else,” he said.

Eyes bulging out of their sockets? How does one begin to break down the serious holes in that logic?

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