Joshua Powell Is Playing The Victim

Fired former superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, Joshua Powell, has sued the board of education claiming he’s been harmed and suffered health-wise.

So, without revealing anything that’s off-the-record in his deposition and without releasing too many details about his personal health information (remember, he filed the suit, he brought it up, it’s his responsibility to provide the evidence), watch this:

Yeah. Okay.

The KY State Police Need Your Help

Danny Ray Burden fell asleep in mid-sentence as he was booked into the Grant County jail, toppling over on the bench where he sat. Prodded awake, he coughed, shook and pleaded for emergency medical attention. [H-L]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton holds double-digit leads nationally over all her Democratic challengers, including a dream team of contenders that remain on the sidelines, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

A few Kentucky counties are searching for poll workers for the upcoming Nov. 3 general election but not Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

The “Resolution Condemning Judicial Tyranny And Petitioning God’s Mercy” asks the state to join rural Blount County in fighting against the ruling and to “protect Natural Marriage from lawless court opinions and the financial schemes of the enemies of righteousness.” [Reuters]

Stephen l. Pruitt today officially became Kentucky’s sixth Commissioner of Education since passage of the landmark Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 that created the position. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years. Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress. [NPR]

This will make your eyes roll back in your head. The Kentucky Executive Branch Ethics Commission described state Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, as having demonstrated “the highest level of ethical standards.” [Ashland Independent]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties collected more than $58,200 in pledges for the coming five years during its annual Building Hope Community Breakfast. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton, as she offered up a sheaf of new health care proposals, said she was “building on the Affordable Care Act.” But lurking in those proposals was a veiled criticism of President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: For many families, the Affordable Care Act has not made health care affordable. [NY Times]

Kentucky State Police are asking for help from the public as they search for a Knott County woman who has been missing since May. Natasha Fugate Jones was last seen by family on May 7, and state police began searching for her on June 7, according to a news release by Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Three top officials with Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign claim political motivations are behind charges alleging they violated federal financial disclosure laws by secretly paying an influential Iowa politician for his endorsement. Paul, a former Republican congressman from Texas, will be called as a prosecution witness at the trial, set for next Tuesday in Des Moines. [AP]

Watch Joshua Powell Throw His Wife Under The Bus, Tell Stories About The Infamous EPO, Concoct A New Story Of Financial Impropriety

Regular readers are all too familiar with fired former superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, Joshua Powell. All too familiar with his illegally-hired wife, Anna. All too familiar with the EPO Anna filed against her husband and the 15 or so 911 calls she made regarding the man. Mostly because it’s played out in multiple investigations, during public school board meetings and in small town newspapers.

But if you’re not? Get caught up:

Now get ready to watch Joshua Powell finally speak about it on camera. Spoiler alert: he throws his wife under the bus at each and every turn:

Fascinating how stories change over time, isn’t it?


Here’s part two of that exchange. Pay close attention to the bits where Powell brings up finances:

Ignore, if you will, the remarks about Anna being the most stable person he’s ever known. Let’s focus on the money.

He claims he’d only discovered in December 2012 — some 18 months after being hired by Montgomery County Schools — that his wife had spent some $120,000 without his knowledge, that he’d never had access to his money or credit cards, etc. He claimed that was the first time he’d ever had an inkling of suspicion about his financial state.

There’s a bit of a problem with his story.

Current and former members of the Montgomery County Board of Education tell us that upon becoming superintendent of schools in July 2011, the district had to co-sign for Powell to obtain a school credit card. A man who had for years drawn six-figure salaries while serving as the top dog in two previous school districts required a co-signer because he’d been denied on his own. But he didn’t know until 18 months later that there was a problem.

And you wonder why Montgomery County can’t have nice things.

Corruption? Fine. Prostitution? FREAK OUT!

How long will it take this guy to turn a blind eye to the things people like Joshua Powell have done in the name of education? Will he clean house? Let’s not hold our breath, now. [H-L]

A deal that allows thousands of companies to transfer data from Europe to the United States is invalid, the highest EU court said on Tuesday in a landmark ruling that follows revelations of mass U.S. government snooping. [HuffPo]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

GOP strategists say McConnell’s strategy for protecting vulnerable incumbents is to show that the Republican Congress knows how to govern, especially in battleground states such as Ohio and New Hampshire, where swing voters will decide the outcome. [The Hill]

A former inmate at the Boyle County Detention Center has filed a lawsuit, saying he received “significant bodily injuries” while being detained at the jail. [WKYT]

Amtrak has told U.S. lawmakers that it will suspend service on its national network in mid-December unless Congress extends a Dec. 31 deadline for implementing advanced safety technology, according to an Oct. 5 letter from Amtrak reviewed by Reuters. [Reuters]

A Massey Energy safety official warned former CEO Don Blankenship about the severity of the safety violations at Massey mines, according to a June 2009 memo the prosecution plans to use to show the “warlike” relationship between Massey and the Mine Safety and Health Administration. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaign is grappling with a pressing and difficult question: How can she contrast herself to Bernie Sanders in next week’s Democratic presidential debate and beyond, without employing the sort of attacks that could boomerang to harm her? [NY Times]

Residents of Russell will see an increase in property taxes after City Council voted to approve the ordinance Monday morning. [Ashland Independent]

Powerful interest groups are already lining up to oppose various provisions in the Trans-Pacific Partnership — the sweeping trade agreement reached Monday by the United States, Japan and 10 other Pacific Rim nations — in hopes they can sway the votes of enough wavering lawmakers to have the deal rejected by Congress. [WaPo]

Members of the Rowan County Historical Society, Rowan County Arts Center Board, Morehead Tourism Commission, Rowan County Veterans Foundation, Morehead Theatre Guild and other concerned citizens met Thursday to discuss a proposal to tear down two historic structures. [The Morehead News]

John Boehner’s speakership is not ending quietly. With less than four weeks left in his decades-long congressional career, Boehner is maneuvering to shape the House Republican Conference on his way out. [Politico]

Kentucky’s education commissioner is appointed by the state board of education, but a state lawmaker wants to change that. State Rep. Kenny Imes, R-Murray, has prefiled a bill for the 2016 General Assembly that would require the commissioner to be confirmed by the state Senate. For another option, he said, he’s also drafting a bill that would require the education commissioner to be elected by a statewide public vote. [H-L]

A top U.S. commander said Tuesday that the bombing of a Doctors Without Borders hospital in northern Afghanistan was accidental — but the humanitarian group, also known as Médecins Sans Frontières, claims otherwise. [HuffPo]

Surprise! Horsey Track Slots Instant Racing Machines Bring In The $$$

The gambling parlor at Red Mile took in more than $5 million in wagering in the first 19 days it was open, according to figures reported to the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission. [H-L]

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) wants Congress to establish a Select Committee on Gun Violence in the wake of the Oregon college shooting that left 10 dead on Thursday. [HuffPo]

If the campaign of Republican Whitney Westerfield for attorney general does not have the money to compete with its Democratic opponent Andy Beshear, the Republican Attorneys General Association does. [C-J/AKN]

We might not be able to remember every stressful episode of our childhood. But the emotional upheaval we experience as kids — whether it’s the loss of a loved one, the chronic stress of economic insecurity, or social interactions that leave us tearful or anxious — may have a lifelong impact on our health. [NPR]

The tell-all book claiming that a former University of Louisville staffer hired escorts for players and recruits is topping charts. [WKYT]

All it takes to officially run for the Republican presidential nomination is a one-page form sent to the Federal Election Commission, the US government entity in charge of overseeing campaign laws. [BBC]

The Department of Justice has issued a statement of interest in a federal lawsuit over children being handcuffed by a school resource officer in a northern Kentucky district. [WHAS11]

Girls, many of whom have suffered a range of trauma at home, make up a growing share of children arrested and detained across the country. [ProPublica]

It’s been more than two months since Beshear’s comments and it’s hard not to believe this controversy hasn’t cost the state of Kentucky more than the $60,000 day it would have taken to call a special session. Aaaaaand this guy is straight up lying to the folks in Richmond as he pushes for more separate but equal nonsense. You wondering why average Kentuckians remain in the dark? People in the media push that sort of crap. [Richmond Register]

Here’s what the world thinks about the American response to the Oregon massacre. [ThinkProgress]

People who live in Eastern Kentucky are a lot less impressed with this Mountain Parkway business than media would have you believe. [Floyd County Times]

About two dozen Republicans on the House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday sent President Obama a letter urging him to keep 9,800 U.S. troops in Afghanistan through 2016. [The Hill]

Do you smell the backroom fun things going on here? [H-L]

Looking back, nearly 20 years later, Jay Dickey is apologetic. He is gone from Congress, giving him space to reflect on his namesake amendment that, to this day, continues to define the rigid politics of gun policy. [HuffPo]

Having It Both Ways: The Joshua Powell Method Of Scamming And Obfuscating

Joshua Powell, fired former superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, has for months claimed the board of education had no authority to suspend him with pay. Even though it did, according to a judge, the Commissioner of Education and attorneys at the Kentucky Department of Education.

Here he is harping on that during deposition:

Recall that Auditor of Public Accounts Adam Edelen years ago advised Powell that he could only have a vehicle allowance or receive mileage reimbursement — not both. He’s continued to receive both.

Note: Early on in the deposition Powell claimed he hasn’t really been able to drive because of health issues, adding more fuel to the fire.

Beyond that, Powell has been scheming every which way from Sunday, digging his hole deeper and deeper, standard operating procedure. You’ve previously seen footage and read about his FMLA snafu and his claims that paperwork was fraudulently submitted on his behalf. You know he claims to have countless medical ailments as a result of being suspended by the board. You’ll also likely recall that he had a physician claim he was unable to work as superintendent beginning early January 2015.

Despite being unable to work — according to his doctor — Powell maintains that he should have continued to receive perks that would have been afforded him were he not suspended and able to work. He also continued to attend conferences despite, again, being unable to work, and claims the district should be paying him for those trips.

The kicker? He was attempting to use those trips to job shop.

Watch this exchange:

Powell later volunteered information that the district had canceled some of his other trips — without his consent, he exclaims — because he was suspended. But he continued to spend thousands upon thousands of dollars on travel while holding himself up as the superintendent of schools who worked all kinds of magic. He dropped more clues about two of his inner circle members — Phil Rison and Larry Bailey — two people who were set to travel with him despite an order from the board to have no contact.

Those details:

He wants to have his cake and eat it, too.

So which is it? Was he unable to work or wasn’t he? Was it all just a CYA stunt to try to get FMLA or disability of some sort (he says he applied for private disability despite continuing to travel and do work against an order from his doctor) if the suspension stuck? You’ll have to form your own opinion because Powell has yet to give a straight answer.

Larry Dale Hit The Nail On Its Head

About 50 people came out on a rainy Saturday morning to see U.S. Sen. Rand Paul rally for Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin. [H-L]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

Republican Whitney Westerfield and Democrat Andy Beshear are locked in a dead heat for attorney general with just over a month before election day, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [C-J/AKN]

Vice President Joe Biden on Saturday praised gay rights activists for the progress they have made in recent years. The vice president gave the keynote address at the Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, during which he honored past civil rights leaders and commended current ones for working to fulfill the principles embodied the Declaration of Independence. [The Hill]

While it’s not the winter just yet, area homeless shelters are bracing for their busiest months now before their supplies run out. “With the winter coming, what we have isn’t going to last,” Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter director Michele Bradford said. “It won’t last.” Employees at the 24-hour Beacon of Hope shelter in Winchester say their food supply is quickly dwindling. [WKYT]

The Associated Press properly identified Liberty Counsel — the legal group defending Kentucky’s Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis — as an anti-LGBT hate group, in an all-too-rare example of a major news outlet accurately informing its audience about Liberty’s extreme views. [MMFA]

What no one is saying here? Rand Paul and his wife, Kelly, are miffed at Matt Bevin over some nasty remarks Bevin allegedly made to Kelly some time ago. It’s a big enough rift that the McConnell crew talk about it all the time. [CN|Toot]

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are set to wade into contentious social matters in their new term beginning on Monday including affirmative action, union powers and voting rights, and could add major cases involving abortion and birth control. [Reuters]

The head of the high tech company coming to Morehead was a guest speaker at Wednesday’s meeting of the Kentucky House Special Committee on Advanced Communications and Information Technology. Robert Schena, CEO and cofounder of Rajant Corporation, told committee members that his company’s technology aboard MSU’s miniature satellites could create a network in space that could be used to keep military defense systems running if the U.S. were ever attacked. [The Morehead News]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

Barren County magistrates voted to adopt an ordinance on second reading Friday to set the county’s real estate tax rate for for the current fiscal year during a special-called Fiscal Court meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Edward Snowden is still waiting on the Justice Department to take up his offer of a plea deal, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents says. [Politico]

Bevin is the most inept candidate in either party since Peppy Martin won the 1999 GOP nomination after Republicans decided to make a statement about public financing of gubernatorial campaigns by not fielding any legitimate contenders. Still, given Kentucky’s anti-Obama sentiment, Conway cannot win in November unless he gets the Democratic base to turn out 100 percent. So far, he has done little or nothing to make this happen. His campaign has been only marginally better than Bevin’s. [Larry Dale Keeling]

The Supreme Court on Friday issued a posthumous response to Alfredo Prieto, a serial killer on Virginia’s death row whose lawyers had petitioned the court several times to put his execution on hold. [HuffPo]