Grimes Has Successfully Rebuilt Her Image

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Hard-hitting press-release journalism. Meanwhile, Montgomery County’s paid out mountains of cash in settlements and the nightmare is ongoing. [H-L]

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said Sunday that he believes rhetoric from President Donald Trump’s administration is “probably partially to blame” for Syria’s deadly chemical weapons attack on its civilians last week. [HuffPo]

Instead of being whiny ass titty babies like the Democrats who enable Trump and normalize his racism… maybe it’s time to wake the heck up? If you’ve followed Adam Edelen at all, you know he’s keen on whitewashing the reasons Kentuckians supported Donald Trump. He and his cohorts still ignorantly claim it’s all economic but you know that’s not remotely the case. Kentucky Democrats will continue to lose while people like Edelen are at the helm of anything. It’s all up to Alison Grimes these days – now that she’s distanced herself from her father and proved she can speak her mind and stand up for what she (not consultants) believes in. [C-J/AKN]

Neil Gorsuch on Monday became the 101st associate justice of the Supreme Court and President Trump’s first high court appointee. [The Hill]

The plume of polluted water was black. In the satellite images, it snaked from the coal ash landfill at the D.B. Wilson Power Plant in Western Kentucky, about 40 minutes south of Owensboro. The water went through a ditch, until it reached a sediment pond. There, the images showed the black plume spreading through the murky green water, before it dissipated. [WFPL]

Internal State Department instructions to implement Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban on citizens of six Muslim-majority nations help demonstrate that the ban violates the constitution, the American Civil Liberties Union argued in court filings late on Thursday. [Reuters]

Mitch McConnell is hardly apologetic for his role in securing for conservatives the ninth seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, calling it “the most consequential decision I’ve ever been involved in.” [Ronnie Ellis]

When Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, sought the top-secret security clearance that would give him access to some of the nation’s most closely guarded secrets, he was required to disclose all encounters with foreign government officials over the last seven years. [NY Times]

A new state law was passed at the most recent legislative session that will place the state in compliance with new federal travel standards by creating a new Travel ID driver’s license in 2019. [Ashland Independent]

Here’s the national media taking a look at racism and backwardness in Mt. Sterling. You know, the town we spent four years covering the biggest education scandal in Kentucky that the mainstream all but ignored. [WaPo]

The elegant black cat glided across the carpeted living room floor, a far cry from her previous home in war-torn Afghanistan. [Richmond Register]

Democrats heard the argument throughout the Senate’s bitter debate over Neil Gorsuch: Don’t filibuster this Supreme Court nominee — save your leverage for President Donald Trump’s next pick, the one who could change the court’s balance of power for a generation. [Politico]

Apparently, Andrew Wilkinson found religion when he got sent to prison. Isn’t that how it always goes? The corrupt political class goes to prison, claims to find Jesus and meemaw and poppop on the street buy it like it’s going out of style? At least this guy has his shitty dad to blame and Jack Brammer to help him whitewash recent history. [H-L]

Republican Governors keep vetoing legislation that would make voting easier because that’s the Republican way. They can’t let thinking people, poor people, old people or brown people vote if they can help it. [HuffPo]

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Hillbilly Elegy Is Republican Bullshit

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When Americans remember the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., they like to recall his “I Have A Dream” speech from the 1963 March on Washington. It is beautifully aspirational — and no longer controversial. [H-L]

Republicans have spent most of the past seven years vowing to protect people with pre-existing conditions, even as they have pledged to get rid of the Affordable Care Act. [HuffPo]

City air pollution officials suspect the area near the CEMEX cement plant in southwest Louisville might violate the federal health standard for sulfur dioxide, a pollutant that’s especially hard on children, the elderly and people who suffer from asthma. But they won’t know for at least three years. [C-J/AKN]

Donald F. McGahn II, now Trump’s White House counsel, made $2.4 million as a lawyer with a client list loaded with deep-pocketed conservative groups, from Americans for Prosperity, backed by the conservative billionaires Charles G. and David H. Koch, to the Citizens United Foundation. [NY Times]

Hillbilly Elegy is bullshit. Della Combs Brashear had had enough. She backed her Cadillac long-ways across the road in front of her house, lit the Virginia Slim in her mouth, pulled her .38 pistol from her purse, and waited, stone-faced and determined, for the next coal truck to come along. [Ivy Brashear]

Former Obama national security adviser Susan E. Rice said Tuesday that she “absolutely” never sought to uncover “for political purposes” the names of Trump campaign or transition officials concealed in intelligence intercepts, and she called suggestions that she leaked those identities “completely false.” [WaPo]

Boyd County avoided losing its four-judge structure after a statewide judicial redistricting plan failed to pass through the General Assembly, but the plan will likely be reintroduced next year. [Ashland Independent]

A U.S. appeals court on Thursday upheld a preliminary injunction against Ohio’s lethal injection process for executions. [Reuters]

Attorney General Andy Beshear has once again gone to court seeking to intervene in open records disputes between a Kentucky university and student-run college newspapers. [Ronnie Ellis]

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) on Thursday said he will temporarily step aside from his committee’s investigation into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election. [The Hill]

Two people who spent years in a Kentucky jail after being wrongfully charged with murder have sued 10 police officers from three departments, alleging a conspiracy to frame them by planting evidence to protect a confidential informant. [Richmond Register]

Senate Republicans invoked the “nuclear option” to gut the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees Thursday, a historic move that paves the way for Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation and ensures that future high court nominees can advance in the Senate without clearing a 60-vote threshold. [Politico]

Funny how this story doesn’t mention an anti-trust investigation, isn’t it? It’s like McClatchy wants to suck more than Gannett these days. [H-L]

It’s the New Republican way. Late last month, federal prosecutors indicted ex-Rep. Steve Stockman and two of his aides, charging that the Texas Republican and his confidants ripped off charities, laundered money, lied to regulators and misled wealthy donors before, during and after his failed 2014 primary campaign against John Cornyn, the second-ranking Republican in the Senate. [HuffPo]

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Massie Won’t Really Stand Up To Trump

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Federal investigators raided a Lexington paving and asphalt company in late March seeking information on bids and the sales of asphalt to paving contractors, documents filed in federal court in Lexington show. [H-L]

Seth Meyers pointed out the similarities between the U.S. political climate under President Donald Trump and the TV show “The Americans” on Tuesday.[HuffPo]

What bullshit spin. Thomas Massie is no more battling Donald Trump than Rand Paul is standing up for his constituents. He refuses to hold Trump accountable and hides from his constituents. [C-J/AKN]

In a groundbreaking, 8-3 decision, the full Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation violates federal civil rights law. [Lambda Legal]

Eastern Kentucky University announced Monday four finalists to become its next Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. [Richmond Register]

Fake news? Not so much. The FBI is planning to create a special section based at its Washington headquarters to co-ordinate its investigation of Russian activities designed to influence the 2016 presidential election, according to a person familiar with the plan. [Financial Times]

A recent WalletHub study revealed Kentucky is the fifth most stressed state. West Virginia was ranked fourth overall. [Ashland Independent]

If you thought Republicans couldn’t get any more scummy, you were wrong! Now they want to conduct drug tests for people who file for UNEMPLOYMENT. [Congress]

This ought to be generally terrible – since Bevin’s office is participating. Rowan County will once again play host to a large Town and Country event. This year, the event will furnish a major keynote speaker from Gov. Bevin’s office. Warren Beeler, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agriculture Policy, will speak at the event that begins at 5 p.m. on Thursday, April 13, at Rowan County Senior High School. [The Morehead News]

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio said Wednesday that he doesn’t think it’s a coincidence that a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria occurred shortly after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson suggested Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad could remain in power. [CNN]

Edmonton City Councilwoman Cathy Nunn caught Edmonton Volunteer Fire Department Chief Jerry Clemmons, as well as some of her fellow city council members, by surprise Monday night when she told him the city council would like for the fire department to start paying its own utilities. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Yet again, the world is watching gut-wrenching images emerge from the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria. [WaPo]

A judge has denied a defense motion that sought to suppress evidence collected during a search that recovered stolen barrels of Wild Turkey and stolen bottles of rare Pappy Van Winkle. [H-L]

White House chief strategist Steve Bannon has been removed from the National Security Council, White House sources told The Huffington Post Wednesday. [HuffPo]

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Another Day, Another Frankfort FBI Investigation Because Kentucky = Corruption

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The FBI is conducting an anti-trust investigation into state contractors involving road work. [H-L]

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) began an all-night protest on the Senate floor late Tuesday, promising to speak “as long as I’m able” in protest of the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. [HuffPo]

They carried black coat-hangers and signs that said things like “Think outside my box.” And they chanted slogans like “Mister, mister, hands off my sister” and “My body, my choice.” [C-J/AKN]

It was no secret during the campaign that Donald Trump was a narcissist and a demagogue who used fear and dishonesty to appeal to the worst in American voters. The Times called him unprepared and unsuited for the job he was seeking, and said his election would be a “catastrophe.” Still, nothing prepared us for the magnitude of this train wreck. [LA Times]

A summit on addiction held last winter at the University of Louisville has produced a slew of recommendations for overcoming the heroin and opioid epidemic in Kentucky. [WFPL]

A couple of weeks ago, for the first time ever, I represented an undocumented worker in deportation proceedings. Or rather, I tried to. My attempts to navigate this system were not what I would call successful. Part of this may be due to the fact that, though I have been a practicing attorney for 10 years, this was my first go at immigration law. But another part of it—most of it, I’d venture—is due to the fact that the U.S. immigration system is designed to be opaque, confusing, and inequitable. [Dan Canon in Slate]

Madison Circuit Judge William G. Clouse on Monday ordered a year’s delay in the trial of Raleigh Sizemore and Gregory Ratliff in the murder of Richmond Police Officer Daniel Ellis. [Richmond Register]

For years, Tammy and Joseph Pavlic tried to ignore the cracked ceiling in their living room, the growing hole next to their shower and the deteriorating roof they feared might one day give out. Mr. Pavlic worked for decades installing and repairing air-conditioning and heating units, but three years ago, with multiple sclerosis advancing, he had to leave his job. [NY Times]

Even in a state with a long history of tobacco culture and a high percentage of smokers, public support for a statewide smoking ban is growing. [Ronnie Ellis]

Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, is currently in Iraq as a White House envoy in a further expansion of his role as shadow diplomat. [WaPo]

The two families who actually showed up Monday morning to protest in front of the Barren County Courthouse had their own sets of circumstances to work through with the state agency that investigates child abuse allegations, but their stories had one thing in common: They don’t like the way the job has been done. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The United Arab Emirates arranged a secret meeting in January between Blackwater founder Erik Prince and a Russian close to President Vladi­mir Putin as part of an apparent effort to establish a back-channel line of communication between Moscow and President-elect Donald Trump, according to U.S., European and Arab officials. Prince’s sister Betsy DeVos serves as education secretary in the Trump administration. [More WaPo]

The Kentucky State University Foundation has paid nearly $85,000 to a Washington, D.C. public relations firm that reports only to the Kentucky State University Board of Regents, working independently of the president and the school’s public relations staff. [H-L]

Ten weeks after the Trump administration unceremoniously pushed out several top-level State Department officials, their positions remain unfilled, and more than half of the positions listed on the agency’s leadership chart are vacant or occupied by temporary acting officials. [HuffPo]

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Republicans Don’t Care About Poor Kids In Louisville… Or Anywhere In Kentucky

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Donald Trump brought Sen. Rand Paul to his Virginia golf course on Sunday to talk health policy with the outspoken critic of the failed plan to repeal and replace so-called Obamacare. [H-L]

It took far more than a year before presidents from Ronald Reagan through Barack Obama earned the disapproval of a majority of the public, according to Gallup. It took Trump just over a week. [HuffPo]

A federal judge in Louisville said in a ruling that then-candidate Donald Trump incited the use of violence against three protesters when he told supporters at a campaign rally a year ago to “get ’em out of here.” [C-J/AKN]

Texas Roadhouse Inc agreed to pay $12 million to settle U.S. claims that the steakhouse chain refused to hire people age 40 and over to work as hosts, servers and bartenders. A consent decree resolving the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s lawsuit against the Louisville, Kentucky-based chain was filed on Friday with the U.S. District Court in Boston. [Reuters]

Disconnection and poverty plague thousands of kids in Louisville. Some 160,000 Jefferson County children live in poverty and about 11,400 young people between the ages of 16 and 24 are out of work and not attending school, according to a new report released Wednesday. [WFPL]

It is no fantasy to say the drip-drip-drip of the Trump-Russia investigations is draining this presidency of political capital. The president’s historically high disapproval rating — 51 percent in the latest McClatchy poll — tells the same story. That’s why astute Republicans are starting to look out for themselves. [The Hill]

Madison County took the next step Friday toward fulfilling Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor’s dream for an innovative, comprehensive attack on the substance abuse epidemic. [Richmond Register]

During the first public Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about Russia’s meddling in the presidential election on Thursday, former FBI special agent Clint Watts explained how Russia and the Trump campaign team up to weaponize fake news. [ThinkProgress]

The $28 million construction project for the new Maysville Community and Technical College-Rowan Campus, located in the John Will Stacy MMRC Regional Business Park on KY 801, is on schedule, according to director Russ Ward. [The Morehead News]

The husband-and-wife team of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump, now both senior federal government officials, has been alongside Trump as the White House has hosted dozens of chief executives and a handful of world leaders in recent weeks. [NY Times]

Cortni Crews was named assistant superintendent of Barren County Schools at a press conference Friday afternoon at the BCS central office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At the Boys and Girls Club in this rural city in southern Oklahoma, the director is unsure how he will stay open if Trump’s proposed budget goes through, eliminating money for several staff positions. [WaPo]

The coordinating agency for Kentucky’s public colleges and universities is expected to set a 3 to 5 percent limit on tuition increases for the upcoming school year. [Linda Blackford]

This is what happens when you mix corruption with stupidity. Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt still doesn’t agree with the vast majority of climate scientists who say humans are the primary cause of climate change. [HuffPo]

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Matt Bevin: The Opposite Of Transparent

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Robert Stivers doth protest too much, henny. The only ignorant and arrogant person involved is him. His bigoted self. He’s the kind of coward who fears shaking hands with a gay person. The disgusting, small (obviously not talking about his massive weight) man who spreads good old boy racism and misogyny left and right. [H-L]

The only way to fix this kind of Republican stupidity is with education. Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, has challenged the credibility of Science magazine — one of the world’s most respected science publications. “That is not known as an objective writer or magazine,” Smith said during a hearing Wednesday on climate change, which Smith denies. [HuffPo]

It appears Matt Bevin is once again playing a shady game of secrecy and your taxpayer dollars are funding it. [C-J/AKN]

Budget documents released on Politico this week detailing the Trump administration’s proposed budget moving forward into 2017 reveal some horrifying truths, including but not limited to $342 million in cuts to HIV/AIDS prevention and research. [OUT]

University of Louisville Foundation leaders put an end Tuesday to a controversial deferred compensation plan that doled out an extra $20 million to U of L administrators. [WFPL]

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday that “alarm bells” should go off whenever President Trump calls something “fake,” adding the White House is trying to mislead the country into believing there is no connection between Russian officials and Trump campaign associates. [The Hill]

It looked like a slam dunk, but as the clock ticked past 11:30 p.m. on the final day of the 2017 General Assembly, it suddenly became clear a bill to limit the power of Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear wasn’t going to get a vote. [Ronnie Ellis]

Michael Flynn, Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, failed to disclose payments from a Russian television network and two other firms linked to Russia in a February financial disclosure form, according to documents released by the White House. [Reuters]

A settlement was reached in a civil lawsuit against the Boyd County clerk and fiscal court that alleged a former deputy clerk was terminated under conditions that violated the Kentucky Whistleblower Act. [Ashland Independent]

When Trump welcomes President Xi Jinping of China to his palm-fringed Florida club for two days of meetings on Thursday, the studied informality of the gathering will bear the handiwork of two people: China’s ambassador to Washington and Mr. Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner. [NY Times]

A man shot his girlfriend in the head then killed himself during a gunfight with police Tuesday night, after a two-day, cross-state crime spree in which they allegedly stabbed an elderly widower to death and stole two cars and a gun, police say. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republicans know that drug testing before giving poor people access to life-saving health care doesn’t work. So what do they want to do? Drug test people who need Medicaid in order to survive. Now that House Republicans have squandered their shot at reordering Medicaid, governors who want conservative changes in the health program for ­low-income Americans must get special permission from the Trump administration. [WaPo]

Hold on to your wigs, Republicans like Scott Jennings and Brett Guthrie. You shouldn’t tweet out screenshots of your mobile or home internet providers if you don’t want advocacy groups to come for your browsing history. If you’re displeased with the actions of your representatives in Congress, you typically have to wait until the next election to try to hold them accountable. But in light of the recent approval of Senate Joint Resolution 34, voters are fighting back in a more creative way. [H-L]

The failure of Donald Trump and congressional Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act could lead to an ironic result: the expansion of government-run health care. [HuffPo]

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