Jamie Comer Beats That Dead Horse

This was Jamie Comer’s laughable press release yesterday: Commissioner Comer is currently in Florida spending time with his family. He will issue a statement tomorrow afternoon about the next steps he will take in this race. [Press Release]

A statewide recanvass of vote totals in the Republican race for governor showed no substantial changes, Secretary of State Alison Lundergran Grimes said Thursday afternoon. But Jamie Comer still might push for a recount. [H-L]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

Citing serious and persistent problems with Kentucky’s food stamp program, federal authorities have warned state officials they must fix the problems quickly or risk losing federal funds the state uses to run the program that helps the poor buy food. [C-J/AKN]

Mitch McConnell said Tuesday the chances are “pretty slim” that Republicans will grow their majority in the U.S. Senate in 2016, saying his goal is to preserve the majority for what he hopes will be a Republican president. [AP]

Nope, the recanvass didn’t change anything. Check out the results in each county. [Click the Clicky]

The Justice Department will not ask the U.S. Supreme Court to stay an appellate court ruling that President Barack Obama’s move to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation should remain on hold, a spokesman said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Bullitt County magistrates have fired a controversial animal control officer and shelter director. [WDRB]

How federal dollars are financing the water crisis in the West. [ProPublica]

Hundreds of people in Eastern Kentucky in danger of losing their disability payments may soon be part of a lawsuit against the federal government. [WYMT]

The US state of Nebraska has abolished the death penalty after a veto-override was passed through its legislature. [BBC]

There is a man holding a knife to the throat of a woman. A person gets out of their car, has a hammer in their hand and advances, yelling. [The Morehead News]

Many of us have old prescription drugs sitting around in medicine cabinets — so what’s the best way to get rid of them? Some folks simply toss old pills in the garbage, or down the toilet. [NPR]

Jean-Marie is dumb enough to think no one will see right through her desire to open an Western Kentucky office. Using taxpayer dollars to eliminate a commute for her? Right, sure, let’s do that. Kentucky has unlimited funds. [H-L]

The House of Representatives will quickly get down to unfinished business once it returns from the holiday recess: defending trading partners that engage in slavery. [HuffPo]

Commonwealth’s Nightmare Finally Ends

A fatal accident at a Union County coal mine last December happened because the mine operator did not have effective safeguards to keep workers from being hit by moving equipment, federal regulators have concluded. [H-L]

Lorca Henley of Bowling Green, Ohio, said her family’s dinners on different nights this week included taco salads, tuna casserole with mashed potatoes, spaghetti with meat sauce and hamburgers they fried on the stove because they were out of propane. [HuffPo]

A man says in a lawsuit that Norton Healthcare lost a piece of his brain. [C-J/AKN]

The place where you grow up doesn’t affect only your future income, as we wrote about last week. It also affects your odds of marrying, a large new data set shows. [NY Times]

In the midst of the celebration surrounding Governor Steve Beshear’s visit to Hazard on Tuesday, another, less cheerful, story was bubbling in the downtown community. This time, though, it did not have anything to do with the usual negative news suspects—drugs or poverty—but concerned the well-being and seemingly unnecessary removal of some of the only greenery on Main Street. [Hazard Herald]

The U.N. Human Rights Council adopted a scathing report consisting of 348 recommendations that address myriad human rights violations in the United States. [ACLU]

Remodeling projects for Foley Middle School and Silver Creek Elementary received bids from only one company, at more than $1.5 million higher than estimates for each project. [Richmond Register]

Seymour Hersh found himself in the middle of an F-5 shitstorm this week after breaking his biggest blockbuster story of the Obama Era, debunking the official heroic White House story about how Navy SEALs took out Osama Bin Laden in a daring, secret nighttime raid in the heart of Pakistan. [Click the Clicky]

The man who was with the Duct Tape Bandit when he beat up and robbed an Ashland businessman is no longer facing a robbery charge, according to a court official. [Ashland Independent]

Will this ever happen in Kentucky? Nebraska lawmakers moved legislation to repeal the state’s death penalty one step from final approval on Friday, one day after the governor, a death penalty supporter, said the state was acquiring more drugs to carry out lethal injections. [Reuters]

A number of Morehead citizens showed up at Monday’s City Council meeting to voice concerns about potential plans for about 100 acres of wooded land recently purchased near the end of Knapp Avenue. [The Morehead News]

It turns out that one of the Grand Old Party’s biggest—and least discussed—challenges going into 2016 is lying in plain sight, written right into the party’s own nickname. The Republican Party voter is old—and getting older, and as the adage goes, there are two certainties in life: Death and taxes. Right now, both are enemies of the GOP and they might want to worry more about the former than the latter. [Politico]

A Lawrence County school bus full of students on their way to school started on fire Friday, authorities said. [H-L]

Students in Puerto Rico launched mass protests this week against the governor’s attempt to slash some $166 million from the University of Puerto Rico’s budget. That’s about one-fifth of the funding for the island’s main public university system. [HuffPo]

Only One Day Of Political Hell Remains

One wants to abolish the state office he is trying to win. Another started her own business at age 9. Four have state legislative experience, and two are Louisville businessmen. [H-L]

Using the death penalty puts the U.S. in a select group of countries that perform executions. [HuffPo]

State Sen. Alice Forgy Kerr said on Friday that she “knows” allegations of gubernatorial candidate James Comer beat his former girlfriend to be true. [C-J/AKN]

President Barack Obama’s war on leaks faces backlash in court. Nearly a decade ago, at a federal courthouse in northern Virginia, Judge Leonie Brinkema set a new standard for taking a tough stance against people who inflict harm on America. [The Intercept]

According to an audit released in a Friday news dump, the former Edmonson County Clerk has a bit of a problem on their hands. [External PDF Link]

Rand Paul is obsessed with BENGHAZZZZZZZZI!!!!1! Obsessed. [The Hill]

On a scale of one to Christine “I am not a witch” O’Donnell, how delusional is Kenny Imes? Allison Ball should beat him handily if Republican primary voters aren’t off their rockers. [CN|Toot]

This is not bourbon and the story will likely cause you to pop a vein. [NPR]

Republican gubernatorial candidates Hal Heiner and James Comer have dropped the pretense they’re “running a positive campaign.” [Ronnie Ellis]

The toxic vapors acted quickly against the Second Platoon of the 811th Ordnance Company, whose soldiers were moving abandoned barrels out of an Iraqi Republican Guard warehouse in 2003. The building, one soldier said, was littered with dead birds. [NY Times]

The most distinctive causes of death in Kentucky over the first decade of this century were occupational breathing diseases such as black lung disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [WFPL]

A debate over the Iraq war triggered by Jeb Bush’s wobbly response to questions about it spilled into a major gathering of Republican 2016 U.S. presidential hopefuls on Saturday, reflecting divisions about whether the conflict was worthwhile. [Reuters]

Frustrating to see a journalist stoop so low that they’re blatantly taking their opener from Comer lobbyist/consultant Riggs Lewis. Lewis was involved with the Heiner campaign in 2010 and is probably the only person on the planet who thinks the only knock on Heiner at the end of that race was that he refused to go negative. Youngman really should not be permitted to cover Kentucky politics from here on out because he’s in so deep with that bunch. [H-L]

The last intact section of one of Antarctica’s mammoth ice shelves is weakening fast and will likely disintegrate completely in the next few years, contributing further to rising sea levels, according to a NASA study released on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Student Loan Servicing Is A Mess

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]



William Hilton Paul, son of U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., pleaded guilty Tuesday to driving under the influence in Lexington. [H-L]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday launched a broad review of the often murky business of student loan servicing, questioning whether the roughly 40 million Americans with student debt are being treated fairly under a patchwork of rules and market forces that could leave them vulnerable to abuse. [HuffPo]

Many small towns in Appalachian Kentucky look a lot like Austin, Ind.; a picture of rural America with its shop-lined Main Street and stubble-filled cornfields — and the unlikely epicenter of the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana’s history. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) is adding cyber liability to its insurance coverage provided to member counties beginning July 1. [Ashland Independent]

What happens when you’ve been kicking the fiscal can down the road for years, but the road suddenly hits a dead end? That’s what Chicago – and the state of Illinois – are about to find out. [ProPublica]

A differing of understandings of which classification the Glasgow Municipal Airport has in regard to the volume and type of its traffic was the focus of a discussion that took at least 90 minutes Monday at a meeting of the airport’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There are 19 Republicans seriously considering launching campaigns for president, and 10 numbers on a phone. That causes a big problem for pollsters using automated polling technology, one of the most common forms of public polling. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Police officers in the Fifth Division will begin wearing body cameras in June. [WFPL]

A former chief justice from Georgia decried capital punishment Tuesday, dubbing it “morally indefensible” and void of business sense. [Think Progress]

Kentucky’s highest court says a fraternity house should be considered a private residence in a search-and-seizure case stemming from a college student’s drug conviction after police found marijuana in his room. [WKYT]

The global pharmaceutical industry is being called on to pay for a $2bn innovation fund to revitalise research into antibiotics. [BBC]

Federal prosecutors are opposing former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship’s request to go home to Las Vegas for Memorial Day. [H-L]

Asking the Department of Defense to consider allowing young undocumented immigrants to enlist proved a bridge too far Thursday in the Republican-led House of Representatives. [HuffPo]

Another Corrupt Judge Gets Revealed

Rand Paul has hinged his fledgling presidential campaign on polls showing him ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in some swing states, but the latest Bluegrass Poll suggests Paul might have a hard time beating Clinton in his own backyard. [H-L]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. [More H-L]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Kingdom amusement park could receive up to $3.75 million in tax-recovery incentives to be spread over the next decade. [C-J/AKN]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Citing concerns for public safety and the environment, the Madison County Fiscal Court unanimously adopted a resolution expressing opposition to the proposed conversion of gas pipeline. [Richmond Register]

The Oklahoma attorney general’s office misrepresented the facts behind a key argument about the availability of certain execution drugs in its filings at the U.S. Supreme Court, BuzzFeed News has determined. [BuzzFart]

Glad to see Riggs Lewis is shopping around the information we uncovered. Yet more proof that the Comer crew is using the Marilyn Thomas incident politically. They’ve had that information about Michael Adams’ ties to Jeff Hoover since early 2014. [Ashland Independent]

A coalition of conservative groups want to make sure Congressional Republicans don’t let up on the fight to eliminate what they call D.C.’s exemption from ObamaCare. [The Hill]

A total of $300,000 is the amount the Rowan County Board of Education had to find last year to balance the budget and this year the district faces the same fiscal shortfall. [The Morehead News]

Republican Jeb Bush said on Tuesday that “mistakes were made” in the Iraq war, moving to disavow a controversial statement he made in support of the 2003 invasion ordered by his brother, then-President George W. Bush. [Reuters]

Multiple coroners in Kentucky have gone years without meeting the training standards that are set forth in Kentucky law. [WKYT]

The heart of the batting order is due up in the House Appropriations Committee beginning Wednesday: four major spending bills that will capture all the contradictions in the new Republican budget over the next month. [Politico]

The only people standing behind Jamie Comer are people like Anne “KT’s Old Fashioned” Northup, Dan “FEAR THE GAYS and Let My Daughter Illegally Run For Office” Seum, Julie “Let Me Pad My Pension” Denton and similar shysters. [H-L]

House Republicans are again attacking measures aimed at protecting U.S. troops from predatory lending practices, two weeks after a similar GOP effort failed. [HuffPo]

The Downfall Of Jamie Comer Continues

Jamie Comer is lying again. He absolutely knew the effects of the bill. Quite a few people spelled it out for him. P.S. Yes, Rogers, McConnell & crew are now supporting Heiner. [H-L]

In the years since “Mission Accomplished,” some 149,053 civilians have been killed, compared to about 7,412 prior to the speech, according to the website Iraq Body Count. Since the speech, 4,637 military members in the Iraq War coalition led by the U.S. have lost their lives, versus 172 prior, according to the Iraq Coalition Casualty Count. As of September 2014, total U.S. expenditures on the war in Iraq totaled $815.8 billion, about 93 percent of which was spent after 2003. That cost is more than 16 times the Bush administration’s original projection. [HuffPo]

Truth is generally a casualty in political battles and there’s not an issue that’s suffered more wounds in this year’s Kentucky governor’s race than the Common Core academic standards that Kentucky adopted in 2010. [C-J/AKN]

Will the Supreme Court look behind the curtain of lethal injection? [The Intercept]

Adam Edelen needs to recuse himself immediately. Here’s why: he’s been asked to join the UofL Foundation board and once asked me for my opinion about it. I told him to run quickly away. But that means he’s got a conflict of interest. [WDRB]

When a member of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s security detail left his Glock and magazine stuffed in the toilet seat cover holder of a Capitol Visitor Center bathroom stall, a CVC worker found the gun, according to a source familiar with the Jan. 29 incident and two other disturbing instances when Capitol Police left loaded firearms in problematic places. A 7- or 8-year-old child visiting the Capitol with his parents found the next loaded Glock lost by a dignitary protection officer, according to the source. A member of the security detail for John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, allegedly left the firearm in the bathroom of the Speaker’s Suite on March 24. [Roll Call]

It was a record-breaking 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (Grade I) at Churchill Downs Racetrack which culminated as 123,763 fans, the highest attendance of all time, watched a memorable win by Lovely Maria. The prior attendance record was 116,046, set in 2010, during the 136th running of the Kentucky Oaks. [Press Release]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell faces a tough choice this week on how to move forward with a controversial bill that would allow Congress to review and vote on a nuclear deal with Iran. [The Hill]

Most eyes were fixed on the Kentucky Derby this weekend, but the Republican gubernatorial primary began last week to look as if it might be headed for its own photo finish. [Ronnie Ellis]

Her campaign barely three weeks old, Hillary Clinton already has been attacked by Republicans on everything from donations to her family’s charitable foundation, to her tenure as secretary of state and her ties to Wall Street. But her rivals, and the political action committees that support them, are treading more carefully on one incendiary subject: her age. [Reuters]

While previous media reports led to the return – or at least the documentation – of several military surplus items missing from the Glasgow Police Department, more than 100 such items remain unaccounted for, and fingers seem to be pointing at a former member of the GPD. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What the Kentucky Derby owes to China. If it weren’t for KFC’s giant Asian consumer base, the annual classic would be a much poorer event. [Politico]

The Fayette County Public Schools board voted Sunday to terminate its contract with superintendent search firm PROACT Search Inc. The board went into closed session shortly before 9 a.m. Sunday to discuss possible litigation against the search firm. [H-L]

The Tata group, one of India’s largest conglomerates, promised to be a good neighbor when it took on the job of building the nation’s first “ultra mega” coal-fired power plant. [HuffPo]

Papaw Gets Gobs Of Derby Tickets

The developer of CentrePointe in downtown Lexington fired back at city officials in a 15-page letter Wednesday, saying the city was wrong to demand that the development site be restored because no work had been done there recently. [H-L]

Feds pay for drug fraud: 92 percent of foster care, poor kids prescribed antipsychotics get them for unaccepted uses. [HuffPo]

Demand for seats at the Kentucky Derby always exceeds supply, but the governor of Kentucky needn’t worry. Churchill Downs sets aside 360 tickets to the Derby — and Friday’s Kentucky Oaks — every year for sale to the governor’s entourage. [C-J/AKN]

For a moment last year, it looked as if the Obama administration was moving toward a history-making end to the federal death penalty. [NY Times]

This doesn’t sound shady at all. Financial assistance from the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission that was intended to help bring country music icon Loretta Lynn to the Plaza Theatre has been rejected by the promoter who requested the money. Sneed had initially requested $12,000 in hopes of using the money to advertise the concert, even though he has not yet discussed the possibility of booking a Lynn concert in Glasgow with the artist’s management. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A bill that would prevent insurance companies from using routine doctor requests to reopen the cases of injured workers and deny previously approved care passed a key California senate committee Wednesday. [ProPublica]

The Tennessee Valley Authority is giving the Glasgow Electric Plant Board $7.43 million as an award in the Smart Energy Technology project. [Glasgow Daily Times]

World stock markets and the dollar remained in sharp sell-off mode on Thursday, having been jolted sharply lower by weak U.S. growth data and cautious comments from the Federal Reserve. [Reuters]

If you live in eastern Kentucky, chances are you are more likely to get lung cancer. That is why doctors want to figure out how to stop the disease in its tracks. [WKYT]

Looks like Jerry Abramson’s been meddling in Vermont and it didn’t go so swell. [Rutland Herald & VPR]

The Carter County Emergency Medical Services, EMS Director Jerry Horn, Dr. Carolyn A. Moore, and former EMS paramedic Amanda Sturgill-Jones have been named in a civil lawsuit in Carter Circuit Court. Horn, Moore, and Jones are named as individuals and in their official capacities in the complaint. [Ashland Independent]

Dozens of horses have tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs – including speed – at the racecourse which will host the Kentucky Derby this weekend. [Daily Mail]

Two trustees at the University of Louisville are calling for change at an independent foundation that manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment. [H-L]

The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid plummeted to the lowest level in 15 years last week, evidence that employers are laying off few workers despite a sharp slowdown in economic growth. [HuffPo]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]