The KY State Police Need Your Help

Danny Ray Burden fell asleep in mid-sentence as he was booked into the Grant County jail, toppling over on the bench where he sat. Prodded awake, he coughed, shook and pleaded for emergency medical attention. [H-L]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton holds double-digit leads nationally over all her Democratic challengers, including a dream team of contenders that remain on the sidelines, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

A few Kentucky counties are searching for poll workers for the upcoming Nov. 3 general election but not Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

The “Resolution Condemning Judicial Tyranny And Petitioning God’s Mercy” asks the state to join rural Blount County in fighting against the ruling and to “protect Natural Marriage from lawless court opinions and the financial schemes of the enemies of righteousness.” [Reuters]

Stephen l. Pruitt today officially became Kentucky’s sixth Commissioner of Education since passage of the landmark Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 that created the position. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years. Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress. [NPR]

This will make your eyes roll back in your head. The Kentucky Executive Branch Ethics Commission described state Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, as having demonstrated “the highest level of ethical standards.” [Ashland Independent]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties collected more than $58,200 in pledges for the coming five years during its annual Building Hope Community Breakfast. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton, as she offered up a sheaf of new health care proposals, said she was “building on the Affordable Care Act.” But lurking in those proposals was a veiled criticism of President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: For many families, the Affordable Care Act has not made health care affordable. [NY Times]

Kentucky State Police are asking for help from the public as they search for a Knott County woman who has been missing since May. Natasha Fugate Jones was last seen by family on May 7, and state police began searching for her on June 7, according to a news release by Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Three top officials with Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign claim political motivations are behind charges alleging they violated federal financial disclosure laws by secretly paying an influential Iowa politician for his endorsement. Paul, a former Republican congressman from Texas, will be called as a prosecution witness at the trial, set for next Tuesday in Des Moines. [AP]

Corruption? Fine. Prostitution? FREAK OUT!

How long will it take this guy to turn a blind eye to the things people like Joshua Powell have done in the name of education? Will he clean house? Let’s not hold our breath, now. [H-L]

A deal that allows thousands of companies to transfer data from Europe to the United States is invalid, the highest EU court said on Tuesday in a landmark ruling that follows revelations of mass U.S. government snooping. [HuffPo]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

GOP strategists say McConnell’s strategy for protecting vulnerable incumbents is to show that the Republican Congress knows how to govern, especially in battleground states such as Ohio and New Hampshire, where swing voters will decide the outcome. [The Hill]

A former inmate at the Boyle County Detention Center has filed a lawsuit, saying he received “significant bodily injuries” while being detained at the jail. [WKYT]

Amtrak has told U.S. lawmakers that it will suspend service on its national network in mid-December unless Congress extends a Dec. 31 deadline for implementing advanced safety technology, according to an Oct. 5 letter from Amtrak reviewed by Reuters. [Reuters]

A Massey Energy safety official warned former CEO Don Blankenship about the severity of the safety violations at Massey mines, according to a June 2009 memo the prosecution plans to use to show the “warlike” relationship between Massey and the Mine Safety and Health Administration. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaign is grappling with a pressing and difficult question: How can she contrast herself to Bernie Sanders in next week’s Democratic presidential debate and beyond, without employing the sort of attacks that could boomerang to harm her? [NY Times]

Residents of Russell will see an increase in property taxes after City Council voted to approve the ordinance Monday morning. [Ashland Independent]

Powerful interest groups are already lining up to oppose various provisions in the Trans-Pacific Partnership — the sweeping trade agreement reached Monday by the United States, Japan and 10 other Pacific Rim nations — in hopes they can sway the votes of enough wavering lawmakers to have the deal rejected by Congress. [WaPo]

Members of the Rowan County Historical Society, Rowan County Arts Center Board, Morehead Tourism Commission, Rowan County Veterans Foundation, Morehead Theatre Guild and other concerned citizens met Thursday to discuss a proposal to tear down two historic structures. [The Morehead News]

John Boehner’s speakership is not ending quietly. With less than four weeks left in his decades-long congressional career, Boehner is maneuvering to shape the House Republican Conference on his way out. [Politico]

Kentucky’s education commissioner is appointed by the state board of education, but a state lawmaker wants to change that. State Rep. Kenny Imes, R-Murray, has prefiled a bill for the 2016 General Assembly that would require the commissioner to be confirmed by the state Senate. For another option, he said, he’s also drafting a bill that would require the education commissioner to be elected by a statewide public vote. [H-L]

A top U.S. commander said Tuesday that the bombing of a Doctors Without Borders hospital in northern Afghanistan was accidental — but the humanitarian group, also known as Médecins Sans Frontières, claims otherwise. [HuffPo]

Whitesburg: The Worst Place On Earth?

Way to go, Whitesburg! Now everyone thinks you’re a bunch of dumb effing rednecks. It’s like you’ve escaped from a television sitcom version of a Nathan Smith-owned trailer park and you’re spewing your stupid everywhere. Perfect stereotype: fat, white lady who sells guns is spewing fear and hatred while a confederate flag and anti-Muslim sign hang in the windows. [WKYT]

Rhyan Moseley, a rising eighth-grader at Lexington’s Carter G. Woodson Academy, has spent his summer in a program at Kentucky State University focused on topics including computer coding and programming, mathematics and game design. [H-L]

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter arrived unannounced in Baghdad on Thursday to assess the government’s progress in healing the country’s sectarian divisions and hear the latest on support for the Iraqi army’s coming attempt to recapture the key city of Ramadi from the Islamic State. [HuffPo]

The big city folks finally started paying attention to what’s going on in Boyd County. Willing to reject more than $1 million a year in revenues, elected officials in Boyd County have called on Kentucky regulators to close a stinky, mega dump that’s fed by daily East Coast trash trains. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump says the chances that he will launch a third-party White House run will “absolutely” increase if the Republican National Committee is unfair to him during the 2016 primary season. [The Hill]

Glasgow firefighters sometimes re-enter a burning house to rescue a family pet that did not make it out with its owners. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

Just before the Greenup Meals on Wheels program went under, two groups stepped up to keep it afloat. [Ashland Independent]

GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush suggested that the United States should figure out a way to “phase out” Medicare, the federal program that provides insurance to more than 50 million elderly and disabled people, at a political event on Wednesday night. [ThinkProgress]

The Kentucky Arts Council has awarded more than $1.2 million in operating support to 91 arts organizations across the Commonwealth including two in Madison County for the 2016 fiscal year. [Richmond Register]

It’s illegal to hire immigrants without legal status. Yet the federal government employs thousands of undocumented workers. [NPR]

This is apparently a sports thing that happened. Rap star Drake has received a cease-and-desist letter from the University of Kentucky. [WKYT]

The documents also raise questions about the accuracy of the Red Cross’ count of how many Haitians it helped, concluding the figures on one project were “fairly meaningless.” [ProPublica]

Nathan Smith’s trailer park business just paid an $11,000 fine for sewage that’s been discharging into waterways for ages and ages. Yep, the big dogs behind Jack Conway and their spokespeople (KATHY FUCKING GROOB) are still all up in some literal shit. [WFPL]

Adam Pushes For Testing Rape Kits

As I watched the roll-out of Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s bid for the Republican presidential nomination last week, I thought I was about to see him announce that he was changing his party affiliation. [H-L]

The Islamic State group launched an offensive in Iraq’s western Anbar province on Wednesday, capturing three villages near the provincial capital of Ramadi where fierce clashes were underway between the extremists and government troops, residents said. [HuffPo]

The News Journal of Corbin reported Monday on an update by the Keeneland Association regarding the plans of the Lexington thoroughbred racing and auction company to build a quarter horse track near Interstate 75 that would have the slot-like historical horse racing. The story was full of interesting political bedfellows in what Keeneland apparently has decided will be called Thunder Gap. [C-J/AKN]

A major Appalachian coal mining company is laying off hundreds of workers in West Virginia and blaming the lost jobs on President Obama’s environmental policies. [The Hill]

Check out the photos of that gigantic boulder. It’s worth the click. [Ashland Independent]

Protesters in several U.S. cities blocked highways and swarmed police precincts, leading to at least two dozen arrests in demonstrations touched off by fresh cases of police violence against unarmed black men. [Reuters]

Adam Edelen on Wednesday launched a major initiative to count the number of untested sexual assault kits across the Commonwealth, as well as make recommendations for reforming how evidence in cases of sexual violence is handled in the future. [Press Release]

A federal judge got it wrong last week when he claimed President Barack Obama indicated that the changes he ordered to immigration policy late last year left immigration officials without discretion about how to handle specific cases, the Justice Department argued in a federal appeals court filing Tuesday. [Politico]

While casual statistics have been used to cast RTW in different lights, rigorous studies that examine RTW’s effect on states’ economies find no link between RTW and jobs. [External PDF Link]

US President Barack Obama offers Iraqi PM Haider al-Abadi $200m in humanitarian aid on his first official visit to Washington. [BBC]

The Franklin County Sheriff is looking for anybody who may have purchased a barrel of high-priced, stolen bourbon. [WLEX18]

It was a day of demonstrations in cities across the nation on Tuesday. The turnout and tone of the protests, organized with the Black Lives Matter movement, were varied. [NPR]

Heads-up, again, to Montgomery County Schools. Western Kentucky suspended its swimming and diving programs for five years on Tuesday after the school and Bowling Green police found violations of Title IX sexual misconduct and assault, harassment and the student conduct code. [H-L]

Opponents of legalizing marijuana can’t be happy about several new polls released Tuesday. Majority support for making cannabis legal is holding steady, while young adults are legalization’s biggest fans. And that’s true both nationally and in several swing states. [HuffPo]

Lexington’s Already Crazy Expensive

It was late, and Bob Stephens needed a drink. The former chief justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court was wrestling with an opinion in a school funding lawsuit. [H-L]

Heads-up to Montgomery County Schools shysters. A judge disregarded prosecutors’ recommendations and sentenced three Atlanta educators to 20 years, seven of them to be served in prison. The state sought five year sentences, with three served in prison, but Fulton County Superior Court Judge Jerry Baxter threw out those recommendations in favor of the much stiffer penalties. [HuffPo]

If the University of Kentucky is to remain competitive in recruiting athletes, it may need the merchants of Lexington to raise their prices. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, look, Rand Paul’s stepford wife said a thing. She’s really mad that the media hold her tealusional husband accountable for his behavior. [Today]

As the deadline for compliance with the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection draws near, so does completion of remediation efforts at Big Run Landfill, according to company officials. [Ashland Independent]

What, you thought merely the handful of wingnut extremists in the presidential race was enough? [The Hill]

Conway says his record as Attorney General proves his resolve on matters of importance to Floyd County voters, including his work to curb the prescription pill addiction epidemic and his efforts in combating the EPA for their overreaching regulations on the coal industry. [Floyd County Times]

The municipal bankruptcies in Detroit and Stockton, California, may foretell more widespread problems in the United States than is implied by current bond ratings, a top Federal Reserve official said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

The local planning committee tasked with detailing the Barren County Schools district facilities needs discussed Monday at the Barren County Area Technology Center how they will continue the facilities plan process in the coming months. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republicans in Congress are advancing a bill to grant asylum to families who want to home school their children. [ThinkProgress]

A mega company’s bid to change the product and flow direction of an existing natural gas pipeline is drawing the attention and concern of citizens and environmental groups across Kentucky. [The Morehead News]

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi is visiting Washington Tuesday at a crucial moment in the war against the Islamic State. [Politico]

On election day in Magoffin County, Jerry Adams said his second cousin drove him to the local Save-a-Lot and gave him $25 to vote for Michael “Doc” Hardin for county judge executive – a key office that controls a lot of jobs in this economically depressed area. Note: Jim Deckard resurfaces. [H-L]

A former Blackwater security guard was sentenced to life in prison and three others got 30-year terms on Monday in the massacre of 14 unarmed Iraqi civilians at a Baghdad traffic circle in 2007, closing a case that had outraged Iraqis and inflamed anti-U.S. sentiment around the world. [HuffPo]

Old White Kentuckians Freaking Out About The Pending Gay Takeover & Redecoration

A sports thing apparently happened and a lot of people are upset. [H-L]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz are among 57 Republicans in Congress who are calling on the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

Paul — who is expected to announce his bid Tuesday at Louisville’s Galt House — cut his political teeth on the theme of reducing the size of government and slashing spending. [C-J/AKN]

PEE ALERT! PEE ALERT! Social conservatives are doubling down on their push for state-based religious freedom laws, lashing out at businesses that have vigorously opposed the measures and accusing Democrats of trampling Christians’ civil rights. [Politico]

Let’s watch the Bowling Green Daily Fat White Guys freak out about equality: Obama also supports same-sex marriage, as does Conway, who said in his announcement of not appealing the ruling that denying same-sex marriage is discriminatory. [BGBS]

Gay rights advocates are hoping to parlay the momentum from their legislative victories in Indiana and Arkansas in the past week into further expanding legal protections for gays and lesbians in those states and others. [WaPo]

Adam Edelen tried to hide part two of a massive state audit on Friday. Kentucky Auditor Adam Edelen has released the second part of the annual statewide audit of the Commonwealth of Kentucky for fiscal year ending June 30, 2014. The audit contains one material weakness and 19 significant deficiencies and notes more than $2 million in questioned costs. [External PDF Link]

A fringe right-wing radio host who believes the government was behind 9/11, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, and several other catastrophes, has been a key figure in the political rise of Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), who will reportedly announce a run for president on April 7. [MMFA]

Local union workers voted on Friday to end a two-month-old strike and return to work at the Catlettsburg Refinery. [Ashland Independent]

Former Gov. Martin O’Malley, D-Md., now positioning himself as progressive populist among potential 2016 presidential candidates, told USA Today that he differs from Hillary Clinton because he opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement he said will “hollow out our middle class and middle class wages.” But just two years ago, there was no criticism to be heard when O’Malley discussed the TPP. [The Intercept]

Barren County Judge-Executive Micheal Hale appointed Jeremy Runyon as county road supervisor Tuesday. [Glasgow Daily Times]

President Obama launched a program Friday to train outgoing military personnel and veterans to work in the solar power sector. [The Hill]

More than two years after Kentucky education department officials took over the daily management of Breathitt County schools, they are offering the locally elected school board the chance to recommend candidates for a new superintendent. [H-L]

The Obama administration on Friday finalized its recommendation to expand protected areas of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, calling on Congress to block about 12 million acres (5 million hectares) from oil and gas drilling. [HuffPo]