Edelen Tucks Tail, Runs Quickly Away

Carolyn Bouchard, a diabetic with a slowly healing shoulder fracture, hurried to see her doctor after Matt Bevin was elected governor this month. Bouchard, 60, said she was sick of politics and had not bothered voting. But she knew enough about Bevin, a conservative Republican who rails against the Affordable Care Act, to be nervous about the Medicaid coverage she gained under the law last year. [H-L]

Authorities are investigating an hourslong standoff and shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs that left three dead, including an officer, as the community planned to hold vigils Saturday to honor the victims. [HuffPo]

Adam Edelen could challenge Rand Paul but he’s apparently still a political coward. If he doesn’t have the guts to pick himself up after losing, he doesn’t have what it takes to hold political office and he should permanently retire. [C-J/AKN]

In recent remarks Robert E. Murray, the chief executive officer of Murray Energy, the largest privately-held coal mining company in America, enthusiastically praised Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Tex., the chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, for leading an investigation into prominent climate scientists and environmental officials. [The Intercept]

Steve Beshear took 33 out-of-state trips during his eight-year term for a total cost to taxpayers of nearly $500,000. The costs do not include Beshear’s security details. [AP/WTVQ]

Vowing to crack down on the nation’s pharmaceutical industry while expanding coverage to 95 percent of all people, Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley on Tuesday laid out his healthcare plan. [The Hill]

Hoo boy, you’re gonna love the latest episode of Al Mohler’s gay panic meltdown. Bill Goodman sure knows how to let buttcramps be buttcramps. [KET]

U.S. presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s support among Republicans has dropped 12 points in less than a week, marking the real estate mogul’s biggest decline since he vaulted to the top of the field in July, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll. [Reuters]

State Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, is one of three nominees for an Administrative Law Judge position in the Department of Workers’ Claims, and her potential appointment poses yet one more risk to the already teetering Democratic majority in the state House of Representatives. [Ronnie Ellis]

When you go to the hospital for an operation, did you know your surgeon might also be performing a procedure on another patient, in a different operating room, over the same scheduled time period? [ProPublica]

A comprehensive government drug study concludes Middle America’s drug problem will get worse before it gets better. Mexican drug cartels are rapidly expanding operations to meet the demand for heroin, according to a report issued by the Drug Enforcement Administration. [Ashland Independent]

Of COURSE Mitch McConnell has sneakily attached a campaign finance rider to the spending bill! He wants to expand the amount of cash political parties can spend in coordination with candidates. [Politico]

William Sisson, president of Baptist Health Lexington, has waited for this hospital expansion for a long time, more than 20 years. Now, the finishing touches are being put on the Baptist Health Lexington expansion, otherwise known as the North tower, for which ground was broken in 2010. [H-L]

Colorado Springs, the town where three people were killed and nine injured in an attack on a Planned Parenthood facility on Friday, is a hub for Christian evangelicals who are opposed to abortion. [HuffPo]

State Democrats Are Still In Major Denial

It’s always the rich white guys who fight minimum wage increases. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray declined to say Wednesday if he would sign an ordinance raising the minimum wage in Fayette County to $10.10 an hour over the next three years. [H-L]

Separation of church and state? Republican presidential candidate John Kasich says he’d set up an agency with a “mandate” to promote what he calls “Judeo-Christian values” overseas to counter Islamist propaganda. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Republicans announced Thursday morning that state Rep. Denny Butler of Louisville is switching parties, putting the GOP one seat closer to capturing the House majority in the wake of Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s victory. [C-J/AKN]

What was that about Rand Paul valuing your privacy? When someone downloads the official Ben Carson, Ted Cruz or Rand Paul campaign apps, they’re handing over personal information that can be shared with any group that has “similar viewpoints” as those candidates. For Cruz supporters, that means giving your data to a British-based company that specializes in psychological warfare. [Vocativ]

Kentucky’s preliminary October 2015 unemployment rate dipped to 4.9 percent from a seasonally adjusted 5 percent in September 2015, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. Kentucky’s jobless rate had not been that low since May 2001 when it was 4.9 percent. [Press Release]

The political network helmed by Charles and David Koch has quietly built a secretive operation that conducts surveillance and intelligence gathering on its liberal opponents, viewing it as a key strategic tool in its efforts to reshape American public life. [Politico]

Kentucky Democrats just didn’t want to listen. Now all good old boy hell is breaking loose. [House Republicans]

Are you ready for more HYSTERIA OMG SYRIAN MUSLIM REFUGEE PANIC?! Cool, because Fox News lady windsock Andrea Tantaros went to work Wednesday. [Wonkette]

The 911 services throughout Kentucky are straining county budgets because of an outdated funding mechanism, county government representatives told state legislators on Wednesday. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… DNA extracted from a skull and a molar tooth of ancient human remains discovered in the southern Caucasus region of Georgia is helping sort out the multifaceted ancestry of modern Europeans. [Reuters]

Council members met in closed session Monday night with members of the Industrial Development Economic Authority of Glasgow-Barren County’s board of directors to discuss the acquisition of real estate. [Glasgow Daily Times]

President Obama is moving to cement a significant legacy in the fight against smoking. Despite Obama’s own struggles with cigarettes, many public health advocates see him as a champion on the issue, and a series of proposals in the waning months of his presidency could bolster his record. [The Hill]

Democrat Jack Conway spent nearly twice as much as Republican Matt Bevin on TV ads, but it was not enough to get him elected governor. [H-L]

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), one of the Senate’s biggest defense hawks, on Tuesday rejected calls by some Republicans that the U.S. accept only Christian refugees fleeing Syria, not Muslims. [HuffPo]

Wild Ernie Fletcher Shenanigans In 3, 2…

Chiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild. Get the popcorn ready. M. Stephen Pitt, a Louisville lawyer who defended Republican Gov. Ernie Fletcher during the state hiring investigation that led to Fletcher’s indictment in 2006, will be general counsel to Republican Governor-elect Matt Bevin. [John Cheves]

Hillary Clinton wants to reclassify marijuana as a less dangerous substance in order to allow more research into the drug’s medicinal properties, the Democratic presidential candidate said Saturday in South Carolina. [HuffPo]

Republican Matt Bevin said often during his campaign for governor that he would have no favors to repay if he was elected governor. But he’s totally gonna have all kinds of his wealthy friends pay off his campaign debt to himself. [C-J/AKN]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

As the United States prepares to intensify airstrikes against the Islamic State in Syria, the Arab allies who with great fanfare sent warplanes on the initial missions there a year ago have largely vanished from the campaign. [NY Times]

“We are doing things in agriculture you can only dream about,” said the director of agriculture policy for the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. [Richmond Register]

Let’s say you are Janet Yellen. As chair of the Federal Reserve, you must decide next month whether to hold down — or nudge up — interest rates. This huge decision could affect virtually all Americans who borrow money, which a lot of people do during the holidays. [NPR]

Two newcomers are joining the Fairview Board of Education as the district continues to emerge from a tumultuous period marked by severe penalties to its athletic programs and allegations of financial irregularities. [Ashland Independent]

Accreditation agencies have recently come under fire for failing to keep schools accountable. Now the Education Department is looking to change that. [ProPublica]

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates four children die every year in large school bus crashes. The agency believes seat belts would cut that number in half. [WKYT]

The former U.S. comptroller general says the real U.S. debt is closer to about $65 trillion than the oft-cited figure of $18 trillion. Dave Walker, who headed the Government Accountability Office (GAO) under Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, said when you add up all of the nation’s unfunded liabilities, the national debt is more than three times the number generally advertised. [The Hill]

A foundation affiliated with the University of Kentucky that was questioned during the controversial ouster of a UK surgeon must turn over its records for public inspection, Attorney General Jack Conway has ruled. [H-L]

This is the kind of crap you can look forward to with Matt Bevin. An Alabama Board of Education member is drawing criticism for making a number of outlandish claims about the Common Core during a recent GOP luncheon. Betty Peters, the state school board member for District 2, in the southeast part of the state, spoke at a meeting of the Republican Women of Coffee County Oct. 21 during which she espoused views on the Common Core, “transgender values” and the “homosexualist” takeover of education in Southern states. [HuffPo]

KDP Needs To Clean House In Worst Way

Whatever Republican Matt Bevin has in mind for Kentucky’s health insurance reform efforts after he’s sworn in as governor Dec. 8, there are unlikely to be changes this winter while people enroll for their 2016 coverage. [H-L]

Ben Carson is truly crazier than anyone thought. Way crazier than Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

A daughter of “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell was cited for misdemeanor prostitution stemming from a 2014 incident, online court documents show. [C-J/AKN]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) has introduced legislation to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. The Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act introduced Wednesday by Sanders would end the long-time federal prohibition on marijuana. This is the first Senate bill to propose legalizing recreational pot, according to marijuana advocates. [The Hill]

Kentucky Republicans didn’t settle for Matt Bevin’s win in the governor’s race; the GOP scored a major upset with Mike Harmon defeating Democratic incumbent auditor Adam Edelen. [Ronnie Ellis]

ProPublica and Frontline reopen the investigation into a death squad run by former South Vietnamese military men that killed journalists, torched businesses and intimidated those who challenged its dream of re-starting the Vietnam War — all on American soil. [ProPublica]

The Rowan County Sheriff’s Office received a call around 5:45 p.m. Tuesday that Phillip Jent of Cold Springs Hollow Road off Christy Creek Road had been shot in the chest by his brother, Robert Jent. [The Morehead News]

After years of denying that American troops will deploy to Syria, President Obama has changed course and decided to send troops to help in the fight against ISIS, also known as ISIL or the Islamic State. [ThinkProgress]

The city of Berea had a very good financial year, according to the results of a recent financial audit. During a council session Tuesday evening, Jerry Hensley and Heather Cochran told officials the city increased its net value during fiscal year 2014-2015 by approximately $5 million. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump has spent much of his presidential campaign bashing his GOP rivals as beholden to major donors, and, in recent weeks, he’s expanded his attacks to include three major donors in particular ― Sheldon Adelson, Paul Singer and the Koch brothers. But POLITICO has learned that Trump or his surrogates have sought to build relationships ― if not support ― from all three, calling into question the billionaire real estate showman’s repeated assertions that, because of his wealth, he has no use for major donors. [Politico]

Democratic leaders met in Frankfort Wednesday morning to talk about how they lost the Governor’s race and three other statewide offices, only winning Attorney General and Secretary of State. [WKYT]

The Rosetta spacecraft discovers molecular oxygen in the cloud of gas surrounding Comet 67P prompting a rethink on the origins of the Solar System. [BBC]

Offering harsh words for fellow Democrats, Kentucky Sports Radio host Matt Jones appeared to be of two minds Wednesday when discussing whether Tuesday’s enormous Republican victories in Kentucky will influence whether he runs for Congress. [H-L]

The U.S. electric sector is expected to hit its lowest carbon emissions since 1995 this year, partly due to the widespread closure of coal-powered power plants over the past five years, a Sierra Club report released Wednesday found. [HuffPo]

E-Day Has Arrived, Everyone Freak Out

The Department of Justice has reached 70 settlements involving 457 hospitals in 43 states for more than $250 million related to cardiac devices that were implanted in patients in violation of Medicare coverage requirements, the Department of Justice announced Friday. [H-L]

While much of the political attention is on the 2016 presidential race, there’s also a big election that’s not getting nearly as much coverage — and it’s taking place this week. As John Oliver pointed out on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” this week’s election could determine who might fall into the “Medicaid Gap” in several states. [HuffPo]

Greg Leichty donated $50 to independent Drew Curtis in Kentucky’s gubernatorial contest and plans to vote for the Fark.com founder. Just don’t ask Leichty, a University of Louisville communications professor, if other like-minded liberals ought to follow his example. “I’m not recommending that other people do,” Leichty said. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump on Saturday announced a plan to reform the veterans health system at a rally in Norfolk, Va. [The Hill]

Though U.S. Congressman Thomas Massie, KY-04, was one of nine representatives who voted against newly elected House Speaker Paul Ryan, he said Friday he is “hopeful” he will bring the legislative process back into regular order. [Ashland Independent]

To hear Donald Trump tell it, blue-collar workers here are suffering as much as ever, their livelihoods endangered by the familiar combination of foreign competition and U.S. companies eager to hold down labor costs. [Reuters]

During a recent campaign stop in Georgetown, incumbent Democratic state Auditor of Public Accounts Adam Edelen promised about a dozen supporters that yes, indeed, there is an election going on. [Ronnie Ellis]

According to a new synthesis of the more than 140 national climate action plans already submitted to the United Nations, the world is on track for a 2.7°C temperature rise by the end of the century. [ThinkProgress]

At a special meeting Tuesday night, the Rowan County Board of Education voted to declare the school board central office as surplus property. Moments later, the board authorized Supt. Marvin Moore to advertise for sealed bids to sell the property. [The Morehead News]

Jeb Bush’s campaign, wounded after another mediocre debate performance, is bracing for the possibility that revenue dries up in the coming weeks ahead. [Politico]

More than a year after the idea was first proposed, the board of directors for Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Medical Services is moving forward with a plan to hire a consultant to evaluate everything about the ambulance service. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The US will release nearly 6,000 people jailed for drug crimes in the coming days, an effort to reform policies that led to mass incarceration. [BBC]

The beautiful, awe-inspiring horse racing is behind us. So let’s get back to the ugly kind with the finish line in sight. Mercifully, the 2015 race to be Kentucky’s next governor is almost over, and voters will go to the polls Tuesday and put an end to this campaign. As they do, here are five questions we’re asking that probably will decide who moves into the mansion in Frankfort in December. [H-L]

Much of the national debate about widening inequality focuses on whether and how much to tax the rich and redistribute their income downward. [HuffPo]

Corrupt Tim Conley Whines From Prison

Corrupt as hell Tim Conley now wants to go back on the plea deal he took! Because of this asshole, Jake’s hometown is still in shambles, occupational taxes have had to be increased out the wazoo, countless people have lost their ability to maintain a home, countless more are still displaced and lives have been lost. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK? Fuck Tim Conley. Let him rot in prison. Let anyone defending him rot alongside him. [H-L]

The White House announced on Friday that a small number of U.S. troops are heading into northern Syria to assist local ground troops in the fight against the Islamic State. [HuffPo]

Looks like Scott Jennings and crew will be spending a lot of money for Brett Guthrie in 2016. And probably a little bit if someone credible runs against Candy Barr. [C-J/AKN]

Rand Paul’s heart isn’t even in filibustering anymore. Because he knows his presidential bid is dead in the water and knows he’s gonna have a tough time getting re-elected to the senate next year. [WaPo]

I wish I could say who will win the governor’s election Tuesday but I can’t. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump and Ben Carson together command more than half of voters’ preference atop the Republican field after Wednesday night’s debate, while Texas Sen. Ted Cruz rose to third place in the latest national NBC News/SurveyMonkey poll released Friday evening. [Politico]

Kentucky’s gubernatorial candidates responded to a questionnaire from Preservation Kentucky regarding Kentucky’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. [Click the Clicky]

U.S. jobs data due in the coming week may hold the key to whether the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates for the first time since 2006 in December, signaling its intention to end an era of almost-free dollars. [Reuters]

Oh, look, the Kim Davis preacher is trying to run for office. “Citizens united for a better Kentucky for a better tomorrow.” That is what Randy Smith said about his bid for the Republican nomination for the 99th District House of Representatives seat. You might know him as the fiery preacher who led the rally cries against gay marriage over the summer on the lawn of the Rowan County Courthouse. [The Morehead News]

President Obama and his FBI director are sparring over whether the so-called “Ferguson Effect” is real, complicating the president’s push to loosen the nation’s sentencing laws. [The Hill]

Steve Beshear has appointed District Court Judge John T. Alexander as the interim circuit court judge, according to an executive order obtained Friday from the governor’s office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

This is big news for the state’s most important newspaper but the six lawsuits and myriad scandals in Montgomery County are not. It’s like Nancy Rodriguez all over again. A freshman course has been abruptly disbanded at Henry Clay High School and the principal has apologized to the school’s decision-making council, saying he gave students academic credit without necessary council permission. [H-L]

Paul Ryan said on Sunday it would be ridiculous to work with President Barack Obama on immigration reform, saying he cannot trust the president on the issue. [HuffPo]

Nobody’s Satisfied With 2015 Candidates

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

Two Republican lawmakers announced bills Wednesday that would increase legislative oversight of the state pension systems for public employees and teachers. [C-J/AKN]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin stopped briefly in Ashland to talk to voters during a zip around the state in a final push before next week’s election. [Ashland Independent]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

A divided Kentucky Supreme Court has upheld the validity of a fee assessed by Campbell County to pay for 911 services. [WHAS11]

A manhunt for a fugitive accused of opening fire at police officers three times in two different states continued for a sixth day Thursday, continuing a search that has closed schools and stretched across a wide swath of this region. [WaPo]

Kentucky’s Supreme Court has ruled that state mine-safety laws and regulations did not apply to a subcontract worker who died while installing a massive garage door on a mine-site building in Muhlenberg County. [WKYT]

Let’s take a look at this again. Peabody Energy, the nation’s largest coal company, is seeking release from a pledge to pay into a health insurance fund. [ProPublica]

Candidates for Kentucky’s offices of governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and agriculture commissioner were recently asked to respond to written questions from the Daily News. [BGDN]

The US Navy scrambled four F/A-18 jets to intercept Russian warplanes which flew near a US aircraft carrier off the Korean peninsula, officials say. [BBC]

Democrat Jack Conway raised more than $900,000 in the first two weeks of October to increase his fundraising lead over Republican Matt Bevin by $5 million. [H-L]

Lots of people seem to think the dominant storylines about Wednesday night’s Republican primary debate are Marco Rubio’s smooth delivery, Jeb Bush’s weak attempt to knock Rubio off his game, and the supposed incompetence of the CNBC moderators. [HuffPo]