How Will Martin O’Malley Do In KY?

Rand Paul stood before nearly 200 fans Saturday afternoon and made clear his intentions to force the expiration of the Patriot Act when the U.S. Senate meets for a rare session Sunday. [H-L]

Proponents of campaign finance reform are asking the Department of Justice to appoint an independent special prosecutor to investigate possible violations of campaign finance law by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush as he seeks the Republican Party’s presidential nomination. [HuffPo]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) is scheduled to announce on Saturday at an event in Baltimore, the city he led as mayor for six years, that he is running for the Democratic nomination for president. [ThinkProgress]

Richmond’s 2015-16 city budget is far from finished, but according to an early draft reviewed by city commissioners this past week, it expects to continue trimming expenses, even as revenue grows slightly. [Richmond Register]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley announced [Saturday] that he will seek the Democratic nomination for president, joining front-runner Hillary Clinton and dark horse candidate Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary race. [NPR]

Under nearly ideal conditions, roughly two dozen hikers met and walked the W Hollow stomping grounds of author Jesse Stuart early Saturday morning for the first Health Hike hosted by the Greenup County Health Department. [Ashland Independent]

The wait is over. Martin O’Malley is running for president. The former Maryland governor formally kicked off his quest for the Democratic presidential nomination on Saturday in Baltimore, the city he served as mayor for six years. [Mother Jones]

Now we know the contest for governor is between Democrat Jack Conway and Republican Matt Bevin after James Comer conceded to Bevin on Friday. If Bevin has a credibility problem, Conway has a sincerity and image problem. [Ronnie Ellis]

“These shootings are grossly under­reported,” said Jim Bueermann, a former police chief and president of the Washington-based Police Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving law enforcement. “We are never going to reduce the number of police shootings if we don’t begin to accurately track this information.” [WaPo]

The Kentucky Department of Corrections is hoping to combat a high number of staff vacancies and turnover rates in state prisons by increasing compensation for correctional officers and other hazardous duty staff, according to a government release. [The Morehead News]

A 13-year tally of deaths and poisonings from ephedra show a spectacular decline after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of weight loss products containing the herb in 2004. [Reuters]

The reality is that Americans who need government aid, like Americans living below the poverty line, represent a shifting population. A parent who loses his job — and the health care that came with it — may need to rely on Medicaid temporarily. [H-L]

Are you ready to throw up in your mouth a little bit? Rand Paul (R-Eggplant Emoji) used some verbal aikido on Jon Stewart during Tuesday night’s “Daily Show,” deflecting questions about marriage equality, and even making an apparent joke about his penis. [HuffPo]

Jack Conway’s Inaction On Full Display

Keith Hall is under indictment and could wind up in prison and Jack Conway thinks this UMG/Mountain Water mess is a-okay. He’s refused to investigate and has pocketed gobs of cash from that bunch. Fun note: Adam Edelen has referred probably more than 100 cases (that he’s keeping track of) that Conway has ignored. [John Cheves]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) announced on Saturday that he’s running for president in 2016. [HuffPo]

Kentucky has no procedure for tracking rape kits. There is no standardized policy for getting them from hospitals to law enforcement to the Kentucky State Police crime lab. No one knows how many are sitting untested at agencies across the state. Estimates range from 2,000 to 10,000. [C-J/AKN]

The newly legal hemp industry is entering its second growing season with some big questions for producers experimenting with marijuana’s non-intoxicating cousin. The federal government has allowed limited imports of hemp seed — in Colorado’s case, this month — for research and development purposes. Companies trying to create a U.S. hemp industry are seeking investors not only for unproven products but for a plant that is still classified under the federal Controlled Substances Act with marijuana and thus cannot be patented. [ABC News/AP]

Saturday night’s statewide Republican dinner was supposed to be about unity, and it was, in more ways than one. But none of his former opponents showed up. [Ronnie Ellis]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley strongly rejected Saturday the idea that another Bush or Clinton should ever enter the White House. [The Hill]

County residents whose lives have been affected by landfill odors met with The Independent last week and said they are calling on the Boyd County Fiscal Court to help find a solution to the problems. [Ashland Independent]

The Obama administration on Wednesday issued a new rule to protect streams and wetlands under the Clean Water Act, a step it said would help keep drinking water safe, but farmers and industry groups argued the regulation will be costly. [Reuters]

Two episodes for the upcoming season of the reality television series, “Fat Guys in the Woods,” was filmed in Kentucky; more specifically in the Red River Gorge and eastern Kentucky cave country areas. “Fat Guys in the Woods” airs on The Weather Channel and will begin its second season on June 7. [Glasgow Daily Times]

How Mike Bloomberg, red-state businesses, and a lot of Midwestern lawyers are changing American energy faster than you think. [Politico]

County Attorney Cecil Watkins filed suit against the Kentucky Department of Corrections (DOC) Friday for architectural and engineering costs for the new Rowan County Detention Center. [The Morehead News]

Back in 2013, authorities in Frankfort, Kentucky, discovered that the Buffalo Trace Distillery was bleeding bottles of Pappy Van Winkle. More than 200 bottles of the super-small batch brown were missing, and it attracted international attention because Pappy Van Winkle (which bottles a mere seven to eight thousand cases of its ultra-premium bourbon, about one-thousandth of the output of Jim Beam) is the sort of thing that millionaires will fight each other for, because people who can buy anything go crazy when they can’t buy something. [Thrillist]

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was not in the audience, but that didn’t stop his former rival and GOP gubernatorial nominee Matt Bevin from trying to put tensions between him and McConnell to bed. [H-L]

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-Wingnut) was so incensed by Sen. Rand Paul’s (R-Troll) comments on the Islamic State and Iraq that he issued a statement on official state letterhead calling the presidential candidate “unsuited to be Commander-in-Chief.” [HuffPo]

Let The Matt Bevin Funtimes Begin!

Daniel Boone National Forest officials have some advice on avoiding encounters with black bears. [H-L]

The United States might just be on the verge of a wind power revolution. Or, at least, the newest generation of wind turbines, featuring taller towers and longer blades, have the potential to push the country in that direction. [HuffPo]

Kentucky and Indiana are among the fattest states in the nation. [C-J/AKN]

How on earth can a majority of people support something that is secret? A majority of Americans support new trade deals, a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Wednesday, even as President Barack Obama struggles to win support for legislation key to sealing a signature Pacific Rim trade agreement. [Reuters]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

First Lady of Kentucky Jane Beshear didn’t seem to mind getting her hands dirty in order to promote agriculture at the dedication of a Governor’s Garden at Morehead State University on Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there’s a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail. [NPR]

An un-named source within the Laurel County school district told WKYT that South Laurel High School was threatened with legal action if they allowed prayer at their graduation this weekend. [WKYT]

Kevin Drum doesn’t write much about guns, which is why I’m going to keep on it a bit here and honor him by rolling out the red carpet for a bunch of grating 2A trolls to stampede into the comments thread. [Mother Jones]

Jack Conway on the nomination of Matt Bevin: I welcome Matt Bevin to the governor’s race as the Republican nominee. I look forward to a spirited race with my opponent and a conversation with voters over the next five months about the issues that matter most to Kentucky families. / This campaign is about standing up for their interests and values. It’s about moving Kentucky forward by creating good-paying jobs and growing our economy, investing in our education system at all levels, and building out our infrastructure. I’m the only candidate with a proven record of putting people over politics, and that’s a commitment I promise to keep. / Sannie Overly, our families and I are incredibly grateful to those who have opened their hearts and homes to us thus far, lending their friendship and support throughout this journey. We are excited to continue crisscrossing the state, visiting our counties and sharing our vision for Kentucky’s future with voters this summer and fall. [Press Release]

In a presidential campaign defined by billionaire sugar daddy donors, Rand Paul has a problem: He doesn’t seem to have one. [Politico]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

Poverty, which affects a growing number of American students, begins its negative impact on learning as early as the beginning of kindergarten, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report released Thursday. [HuffPo]

Is Lex Envious Of The Lou Shootings?

If Matt Bevin’s ignorance and code words leave you with a bitter taste in your mouth, you’re not alone. [H-L]

As Congress prepares to give President Barack Obama expedited powers to “fast-track” trade deals through Congress, many U.S. steel mills and skeptics of Obama’s trade agenda are worried about steel dumping, the term commonly used to describe countries selling steel below market price. [HuffPo]

State contractors, Steve Beshear appointees to important state boards, and two directors of R.J. Corman Railroad Group were among the big givers to the Kentucky Democratic Party in April. [C-J/AKN]

In the dead of night, they swept in aboard V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. Landing in a remote region of one of the most volatile countries on the planet, they raided a village and soon found themselves in a life-or-death firefight. It was the second time in two weeks that elite US Navy SEALs had attempted to rescue American photojournalist Luke Somers. And it was the second time they failed. [The Nation]

If the city administration’s budget plan is adopted, Richmond Tourism will no longer be the lead organizer and funder of three popular events. [Richmond Register]

Presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-Under the Bridge) ceded the Senate floor just before midnight Wednesday after more than 10 hours. [The Hill]

A former Carter County paramedic pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges that she diluted pain medication belonging to Carter County Emergency Medical Services, according to court records. [Ashland Independent]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits rose slightly more than expected last week, but the underlying trend continued to suggest the labor market was tightening. [Reuters]

Weeks after a video that rocked the county and brought into question the authorities of county officials was uploaded to Facebook, state officials have decided to take the first steps into looking into the case. [Hazard Herald]

If Jack Conway falls, it won’t be because of President Barack Obama and Kentucky racism. It’ll be because of Jack’s poor political decision making and the handful of shitty people he surrounds himself with. If he wants to win, he’ll turn over a new leaf (like he did with refusing to fight against marriage equality) and he’ll abandon the typical KDP tripe. [Politico]

A jury trial was set to begin June 1 for the alleged murder of two-year-old Nathaniel Jones but like the past six years, it will be delayed again. Tiea Jones and her former boyfriend, Brian Gallagher, were indicted in 2010 for murder and criminal abuse, first degree. [The Morehead News]

The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show the 15 cities with the biggest population increases were in the South and West — with two exceptions: New York City and Columbus, Ohio. [NPR]

A man was shot and wounded early Wednesday while walking through Martin Luther King Park, Lexington police said. [H-L]

It wasn’t that the intelligence community was giving the administration wholesale faulty intelligence. It was that the administration was lying to the American people about what the intelligence actually showed. [HuffPo]

Jamie Comer Still Clinging To Life

The four Republican candidates for governor bad-mouthed one another in the early minutes of Monday night’s debate, then tried to move past the controversy that has enveloped the race for the past two weeks. What planet is Matt Bevin on? The race has been nasty for a year. [H-L]

Doctors performing late-term abortions would be required to take steps to give the fetus the best chance of survival, according to a Republican bill the House plans to debate this week. [HuffPo]

Terry Stephens, the Russell Springs businessman who spent $5 million on an unsuccessful independent campaign to elect Republican David Williams governor in 2011, has contributed another $100,000 to an independent effort to help James Comer win Tuesday’s Republican primary for governor. [C-J/AKN]

Wall Street is worried that Sen. Bernie Sanders’s vigorous calls for banking industry reform will pull Hillary Clinton to the left, as the two presidential candidates battle for the 2016 Democratic nomination. [The Hill]

Bon Secours Kentucky Health System CEO Kevin Halter has been elected and installed as chairman of the Kentucky Hospital Association’s board of Trustees for the association’s 2015-16 year. [Ashland Independent]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

After resuming its open meeting on Monday night following a closed session to discuss the future acquisition or sale of real property, Cave City Mayor Dwayne Hatcher asked the city council for permission to proceed with negotiations with “industrial work” up to $40,000. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Researchers in the US have revealed a secret of the success of invasive fire ants – they can excavate any type of soil. Three-dimensional scanning revealed that the insects were able to build their complex nests regardless of the size of grains they needed to move. [BBC]

Community Farm Alliance and the Eastern Kentucky Food Systems Collaborative are accepting submissions for a local food guide to highlight eastern Kentucky restaurants, farmers markets, CSA’s (Community Supported Agriculture), and agri-tourism events. Owners and patrons are invited to submit their local food business to the guide via an online survey. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The House Appropriations Committee found itself at ground zero in the budget wars Wednesday, as Republicans proposed new cuts from legal services for the poor even as outside events forced more second guessing about reductions in transportation and housing programs. [Politico]

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has announced an award of nearly $7.5 million in National Emergency Grant funds to the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program, Inc. (EKCEP) to provide training and employment services to help out-of-work Eastern Kentuckians affected by the region’s economic struggles retrain and return to the workforce. [Hazard Herald]

Cesar Vargas has a resume most young Americans would envy. He graduated from a Brooklyn high school that counts Sens. Chuck Schumer and Bernie Sanders among its alumni. He made honors in both college and law school. But because he was brought to the United States from Mexico illegally when he was 5 years old, he can’t fulfill one of his dreams: joining the armed forces. [NPR]

Jim Ratliff is a glimmer of what could be possible to diversify jobs in Eastern Kentucky, a region hurt by a sharp downturn in the coal industry that long underpinned the economy. [H-L]

The Obama administration on Monday granted conditional approval to Shell to begin exploratory drilling in the Arctic, which the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management said would be “subject to rigorous safety standards.” [HuffPo]

Bevin: Now An Early Education Expert

The race for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in Kentucky is a dead heat, with Hal Heiner, James Comer and Matt Bevin all statistically tied with a week to go until the May 19 primary, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [H-L]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [More H-L]

The nation focused its attention last year on deaths resulting from some police officers’ controversial use of force. But just as tensions rose between law enforcement and citizens in 2014, so did killings of officers. [HuffPo]

Gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin called for reconsidering money spent on early childhood education, saying that the current Head Start program isn’t working. [C-J/AKN]

Likely Republican presidential contender and former Gov. Jeb Bush (Fla.) is attracting heat from conservatives for his recent declaration that he, too, would have invaded Iraq in 2003 if he had been president. [The Hill]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline, which decided last week to retain rather than float off its HIV drugs business, is to collaborate with U.S. scientists in developing a cure for AIDS. [Reuters]

The City of Glasgow took steps Monday to encourage a local business’ growth in addition to what local and state economic development authorities have done. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Incommunicado Forever: Gitmo detainee’s case stalled for 2,477 days and counting. The Senate torture report chronicled the CIA’s interrogation of high-profile detainee Abu Zubaydah, but the justice system’s treatment of his habeas corpus petition has largely escaped notice. [ProPublica]

Fitz Steele had his LRC staffers write a thing for the local paper. [Hazard Herald]

Deb Nardone does a lot of traveling. As campaign director for the Sierra Club’s natural gas reform campaign, she goes to the places where fracking is prolific, speaking to affected families. When she’s in Pennsylvania, she’s most often in poor, rural townships — like Dimock, in Susquehanna county. [Think Progress]

Family is seeing the good points and the bad points in each other, and loving them anyway, said Donna Bailey, a foster, adoptive and biological parent. Bailey and her husband, John, recently were recognized as Foster Parents of the Year by the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services. [Richmond Register]

The height of a swathe of the Himalayas has dropped by around one metre as a result of the devastating Nepal earthquake, scientists say. [BBC]

Louisville businessman Matt Bevin gave $500,000 on April 24 to his Republican campaign for governor, while former Kentucky Supreme Court Justice Will T. Scott provided his GOP gubernatorial campaign with $61,146. [H-L]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

Tom Eblen Hit The Nail On The Head

On the campaign trail this spring, the two Republican candidates for state attorney general talk more about current officeholder Jack Conway and the lone Democrat running for the job, Andy Beshear, than they do about each other. [H-L]

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R-Slightly Smarter Dubya) would have authorized the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, putting the likely 2016 presidential contender on the same page as his brother George W. Bush, the president who actually did so. [HuffPo]

In her autobiography “A Trail of Feathers,” Tracey Damron gives spiritual explanations for many eventful turns in a life that led her inside the world of Kentucky Republican politics. But her explanation for the breakup of a seven-year marriage to Will T. Scott is an earthly one. [C-J/AKN]

Democrats are chiding Republican leaders in Congress as standing in the way of improvements to ObamaCare that enjoy bipartisan support. [The Hill]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner faces a formidable challenge in his bid to reform public worker pensions by changing the state constitution, and even if he succeeds the move may not resolve the state’s pension funding woes for years to come. [Reuters]

Everyone who was supposed to turn in a financial interest statement to the Glasgow Board of Ethics did so, and it was in a timely manner, said City Clerk Tommie Birge, to whom the statements must be submitted. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Sen. Bernie Sanders hates the Supreme Court Citizens United ruling and if he becomes president he’ll make sure his Supreme Court nominees vote to overturn it, he said Sunday. [Politico]

Morehead-Rowan County-Lakeview Heights Joint Planning Commission Wednesday discussed ways to address storm water control after another major flood hit Rowan County in early April. [The Morehead News]

Scientists say they have exposed a scandal at the heart of Ancient Egypt’s animal mummy industry. A scanning project at Manchester Museum and the University of Manchester has revealed that about a third of the bundles of cloth are empty inside. [BBC]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

The Labor Department’s latest report shows employers created 223,000 jobs in April and the unemployment rate went down another notch to 5.4 percent. [NPR]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Low-income students in Kentucky and Texas are graduating high school at almost the same rates as their middle-class and affluent peers, defying a long U.S. trend. [HuffPo]