Will T. Clay Beat The Bevin Administration?

Two men have been charged with trespassing after they purposefully went over Cumberland Falls in kayaks Saturday, according to the state Department of Parks. [H-L]

Hacker group Anonymous is pledging once again to take on Donald Trump. “Dear Donald Trump, we have been watching you for a long time, and what we see is deeply disturbing,” an Anonymous representative said in a video posted to YouTube earlier this month. [HuffPo]

Accusing the administration of Gov. Matt Bevin of a “jaw-dropping display of authoritarian hypocrisy,” a lawyer for Planned Parenthood is asking a judge to dismiss a lawsuit that Bevin’s general counsel filed last month alleging the organization was operating an unlicensed abortion facility. [C-J/AKN]

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Coward) reiterated Tuesday that he would support Donald Trump if he wins the GOP nomination, even as the Speaker called on the party’s front-runner to tone down his rhetoric amid a spate of violence at recent campaign rallies. [The Hill]

After nearly four years, the City of Glasgow has reached a settlement agreement with a former Glasgow Fire Department sergeant who was fired in 2012. [Glasgow Daily Times]

One one think Obama might have a different attitude when someone like Matthew Barzun so close to him. U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday made a passionate case for mobile devices to be built in a way that would allow the government to gain access to personal data if needed to prevent a terrorist attack or enforce tax laws. [Reuters]

Poor Morehead is fighting over a hookah lounge because 1997 has apparently just arrived there. [The Morehead News]

How hot was it last month globally? It was so hot that the famed Iditarod sled race in Alaska brought in extra snow from hundreds of miles away by train. [ThinkProgress]

He pushes the button and the mechanism inside the case retracts the thin metal strip. As it snaps back into place, a small cloud of sawdust erupts in the air. He’s measured twice, so he makes the cut. [Richmond Register]

When Bernie Sanders won the primary in Michigan last week, it shook up the narrative of the Democratic race. [NPR]

What the poop? No wonder folks are leaving. She defrauded her publisher, got caught up in her husband’s crimes & basically paid herself instead of helping veterans. [Ashland Independent]

The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee is asking the U.S. Justice Department for information about how aggressively it pursues elder abuse in nursing homes, particularly cases in which workers share degrading photos or videos of residents on social media. [ProPublica]

We still maintain that this is probably one of Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes’ biggest accomplishments. [H-L]

The United States on Tuesday eased some of its Cuba restrictions before President Barack Obama’s to the former Cold War enemy next week, allowing Cuba and its people greater access to U.S. financial institutions and relaxing travel limits. [HuffPo]

In deciding on Judge Garland, Mr. Obama picked a man who persevered through a lengthy political battle in the mid-1990s that delayed his own confirmation to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit by more than a year. [NY Times]

A Republican Named Scott Jennings Cowardly Tip-Toed Around Donald Trump’s Blatant Bigotry And Racism

A federal agency is investigating the Bluegrass Area Development District’s spending of federal money for aging services, according to a letter obtained by the Herald-Leader. [H-L]

Another Donald Trump supporter was caught on video evoking Nazis as he yelled at protesters following a rally in Cleveland on Saturday. “Go to Auschwitz,” the man said to the protesters after raising his arm in an apparent Nazi salute. “Go to fucking Auschwitz.” [HuffPo]

Of course Scott Jennings wrote an entire column attempting to explain the rise of Donald Trump as an authoritarian without once mentioning bigotry or racism. Because Jennings, like his Republican colleagues, are afraid to be up front about what’s going on. It’s cowardly and as shameful as what Trump’s actually doing. [C-J/AKN]

The modern Republican Party is an awkward contraption that harnesses a politics of white ethno-nationalism to a policy agenda dominated by the Ayn Rand–inflected anti-statism. Donald Trump has exploited the wedge between the party’s voters and the ideologists of its master class, placing the latter in an awkward spot. In the face of this threat, there are many possible responses for an advocate of traditional Goldwater-Reagan conservatism to make. The most bracingly honest may come from National Review’s Kevin Williamson, whose antipathy for Trump has expanded to include Trump’s white working-class supporters. [NY Magazine]

The policy council for emergency management of Boyd County unanimously chose Tim England as its new director on Friday. [Ashland Independent]

The House Budget Committee on Tuesday unveiled a GOP spending vision for 2017 that promises to cut $7 trillion from the national deficit over a decade – the sharpest cuts ever proposed by the committee. [The Hill]

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes is pushing for Kentucky to join most of its neighbors — and the majority of the United States — in offering expanded early voting. [Richmond Register]

In April 2014, the administration of President Barack Obama announced the most ambitious clemency program in 40 years, inviting thousands of jailed drug offenders and other convicts to seek early release and urging lawyers across the country to take on their cases. Nearly two years later the program is struggling under a deluge of unprocessed cases, sparking concern within the administration and among justice reform advocates over the fate of what was meant to be legacy-defining achievement for Obama. [Reuters]

Even after Morehead Utility Plant Board spent close to $6 million for flood damage expenses incurred in 2010 to the wastewater treatment plant on Bullfork Road, some nearby residents say the odor from the facility is worse than ever. [The Morehead News]

The Obama administration is expected to withdraw its plan to permit oil and gas drilling off the southeast Atlantic coast, yielding to an outpouring of opposition from coastal communities from Virginia to Georgia but dashing the hopes and expectations of many of those states’ top leaders. [NY Times]

Monroe County residents have contacted the sheriff’s office to report at least one loud explosion over the weekend. It was probably Jamie Comer fuming over his hemp mess falling apart. [Glasgow Daily Times]

More than two decades of studying Agent Orange exposure hasn’t produced a solid understanding of how the toxic herbicide has harmed Vietnam War veterans and possibly their children, according to a report released Thursday. Additional research is long overdue, the report said, but the federal government hasn’t done it. [ProPublica]

When people call from the U.S. or Canada to rent a U-Haul trailer, one representative they reach is Mary Kibbey, working from the small office at her house in the hills of rural Owsley County. [H-L]

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is out with a new ad tying vulnerable Republicans to Donald Trump, the first in an initiative that will no doubt pick up in the coming weeks. [HuffPo]

Pbbbbbbt! Who Needs Mine Safety?!

The Kentucky state Senate has approved a bill that would give public school districts an incentive for starting school in late August. [H-L]

Billionaires, tech CEOs and top members of the Republican establishment flew to a private island resort off the coast of Georgia this weekend for the American Enterprise Institute’s annual World Forum, according to sources familiar with the secretive gathering. The main topic at the closed-to-the-press confab? How to stop Republican front-runner Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

Harvard chemist Daniel Nocera’s search for inexpensive sources of renewable fuel has won him 40 international and national awards. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski forcibly yanked Breitbart reporter Michelle Fields out of the way after his press conference in Florida on Tuesday night. [Politico]

A bill under consideration in Kentucky’s General Assembly would eliminate state mine inspections, a move that a safety advocate said would have adverse effects on mine safety in Kentucky. [WFPL]

For Barbara Radley, there is “before” and “after.” Before was when she could work — moving furniture, and driving a long-haul truck. “It was nothing for me to throw a couch on my back and carry it up a flight of stairs,” says the 58-year-old from Oshkosh, Wis. Then there’s after. [NPR]

Members of the Cave City Tourism and Convention Commission were asked Saturday during their retreat at Cave Country RV and Campground to list goals they would like to achieve for the coming year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Christi Foster grew up in Georgia. While the state doesn’t spend a lot on its safety net for the poor, she says that enrolling in benefits wasn’t too complicated. “You go and apply for something and you find out that day or within a week’s time,” she said. [ThinkProgress]

Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget for the 2016-18 biennium could result in personnel cuts to the Rowan County school district’s Family Resource and Youth Service Centers (FRYSC). [The Morehead News]

Verizon agreed to pay $1.35 million to settle Federal Communications Commission charges that it violated customers’ privacy when it used a hidden undeletable number to track cellphone users. [ProPublica]

Promise Zone is a term people in Southeast Kentucky have been hearing frequently since 2014, when the Promise Zone initiative was first placed into motion. Five separate regions in the United States received Promise Zone designations from the federal government because of poor economic conditions and bleak outlooks for economic stimulation in the near future. Eight counties in Southeast Kentucky make up one of the Promise Zones, with one of those counties being Perry County. [Hazard Herald]

The U.S. gun industry is trying to shake off the Hollywood hitman image of the gun silencer and rebrand it as a hearing-protection device in a campaign to roll back regulations that date to the 1930s. [Reuters]

Legislation aimed at making the opportunity for early voting a Kentucky staple for any registered voter was approved by a House panel Monday with backing from Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes. [H-L]

Flint resident Lee-Anne Walters didn’t like Bernie Sanders’ response to her question about lead pipes during Sunday night’s Democratic presidential debate in Flint. But she really didn’t like Hillary Clinton’s response. [HuffPo]

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Jerry Lundergan’s Good Old Boy Mess Is Once Again Center Stage

During her three political campaigns, including an $18 million run for the U.S. Senate in 2014, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes reported paying $111,831 to Lexington companies owned by her father, former state Democratic Party chairman Jerry Lundergan, and $41,745 more in direct payments to him and other family members, for various services. [John Cheves]

As Sen. Turd Cruz (R-Tex.) campaigns across the Granite State ahead of next Tuesday’s first-in-the nation primary, he’s changing rhetoric in an attempt to expand his base and attract libertarian-leaning supporters following Sen. Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) exit from the race this week. [HuffPo]

Conservationists have pounced on a bill that sought to allow motorized all-terrain vehicles on the Pine Mountain State ScenicTrail that’s being developed for backpacking and primitive camping along 120 miles of scenic Eastern Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

The State Department Inspector General has found that classified emails were received on the personal accounts of former Secretary of State Colin Powell and the senior aides to his successor, Condoleezza Rice. [The Hill]

The new head of Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet doesn’t expect any short-term rebound in the state’s struggling coal industry. In his first appearance before the state Senate Natural Resources and Energy Committee, Secretary Charles Snavely told senators the outlook wasn’t good over the next five years. [WFPL]

U.S. President Barack Obama will launch a long-shot bid next week to impose a $10-a-barrel tax on crude oil that would fund the overhaul of the nation’s aging transportation infrastructure, the White House said on Thursday. [Reuters]

House Democrats proved willing to compromise on one abortion-related bill in a critical election year, but there were signs Friday they aren’t prepared to do it a second time. [Ronnie Ellis]

US presidential hopeful Marco Rubio has seen a surge in high-profile endorsements, after a surprisingly strong finish in the Iowa caucuses. [BBC]

A group of students from Clark-Moores Middle School will be traveling to Frankfort Tuesday where they will meet with legislators and advocate for the passage of Senate Bill 33, which will make training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) a requirement for graduation in Kentucky schools. [Richmond Register]

If U.S. and British negotiators have their way, MI5, the British domestic security service, could one day go directly to American companies like Facebook or Google with a wiretap order for the on-line chats of British suspects in a counterterrorism investigation. [WaPo]

It’s been no secret that Morehead City Council has been mulling the thoughts of building a joined police and fire station in the near future. [The Morehead News]

Really? It takes “insiders” to know that Marco Rubio crashed and burned? [Politico]

An ongoing cultural battle between coal mining and environmental groups played out in a Senate hearing Wednesday over an Obama administration proposal to mitigate the impacts of coal mining activity on streams. [H-L]

The United States has to reduce greenhouse emissions to less than a quarter of what they were in 2005 to meet its commitment under the Paris climate agreement. [HuffPo]

Coal. Just. Keeps. On. Dying. Its. Death.

People can’t stop snickering over the Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes and Jerry Lundergan subpoenas. [H-L]

Tensions soared across the Hawkeye State during Monday’s Iowa Caucuses. Polls were thwarted, two candidates ended their run for the presidency and another decided to leave the state all together to get some fresh clothes. [HuffPo]

Some 300 or more Kentuckians could retroactively earn their GEDs as the state opts to lower the score required to pass the high school equivalency exam. [C-J/AKN]

Barclays and Credit Suisse have been fined a total of $154m (£108m) by US regulators for their US “dark pool” trading operations. [BBC]

Coal production in Kentucky has slumped to its lowest level since the 1950s after declining nearly 21 percent in 2015. [Harlan Daily Independent]

Hillary Clinton narrowly defeated Bernie Sanders in the Iowa caucuses, according to results announced by the state Democratic Party early Tuesday morning, a dramatic finish to a race so close that The Associated Press declined to call it even after every precinct except one had reported results. [Politico]

At a time when private support is more critical than ever, alumni and friends of Eastern Kentucky University are generously giving of their time, talents and treasure. [Richmond Register]

Damn self-haters. The Log Cabin Republicans are interested in holding Democrats to high standards for LGBT equality, but not their own party. [ThinkProgress]

Nine candidates have filed to run for six seats on the Morehead City Council in the November general election. [The Morehead News]

A journalist immerses herself in New York’s Family Court system and finds a mix of misery and modest hope. [ProPublica]

Documents released to the Glasgow Daily Times in response to open records requests shed slightly more information on the situation that led to a Glasgow Police Department sergeant’s firing. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Pentagon’s planned 2017 budget will shifts its focus on future wars against near-peer competitors Russia and China, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Tuesday. [The Hill]

A non-profit working to revitalize downtown Middlesboro has been awarded $20,000 under a program aimed at making local foods a greater part of local economies. [H-L]

A great man named Donald Trump once said, “I am a whiner, and I keep whining and whining until I win.” Sadly, this Churchillian testicular fortitude came to nought on Monday, as the country’s foremost wall-promiser and fear-player-onner went down to defeat in the GOP’s Iowa caucuses. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Make Plans For January 4 Swearing-In

If you haven’t kept up, Kentucky’s statewide constitutional officers will be sworn in on January 4 at 11:00 A.M. Eastern.

Governor Bigot and Lieutenant Governor Space Cadet will be on-hand for the event in the rotunda of the capitol in Frankfort. It’s free and open to the public.

Those being sworn in:

  • Allison Ball, State Treasurer
  • Andy Beshear, Attorney General
  • Alison Lundergan Grimes, Secretary of State
  • Mike Harmon, Auditor of Public Accounts
  • Ryan Quarles, Commissioner of Agriculture

Haven’t received a release from KET but it’s probably a safe assumption the event will be live on TV and streamed via KET’s website.

Let’s Hope Hampton Tones Down Extremism

Republican state Rep. Mike Harmon defeated state Auditor Adam Edelen, denying a second term to a politician many have seen as a rising star among Kentucky Democrats. [H-L]

Years before the high-profile deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Freddie Gray, more than half of African-American millennials indicated they, or someone they knew, had been victimized by violence or harassment from law enforcement, a new report says. [HuffPo]

Coal no longer burns at the LG&E Cane Run power plant, ending decades of production of waste products such as ash and sludge that brought blowing ash and foul odors. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s newest lieutenant governor-elect is unique in many ways. She and her running mate, Gov.-elect Matt Bevin, are some of this election cycle’s first victorious political outsiders. (Bevin had been likened to Donald Trump). Jenean Hampton is also the first African American to be elected to statewide office in Kentucky. And she’s just one of a handful of black women on the national level to identify with the tea party movement. [WaPo]

The Harlan Fiscal Court met in a special called session on Friday to discuss a few topics including an agreement with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet concerning $275,000 in discretionary funds for Harlan County roads from the Governor’s Office. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

In the long legal struggle against the death penalty, the future has in some ways never looked brighter. [NY Times]

An investigation is underway after a deadly shooting in Rowan County. [WKYT]

A new design for lithium-air batteries overcomes several hurdles that have stood in the way of this “next-generation” concept. [BBC]

The only local race in Pulaski County’s general election has ended with former Ferguson Councilor Linda Hughes once again filling a seat on that city’s governing body. [Commonwealth Journal]

California jails could soon stop locking up tens of thousands of people who haven’t even appeared before a judge yet simply because they’re too poor to post bail, if a class-action lawsuit filed Wednesday succeeds. [ThinkProgress]

In a close decision, Henderson County residents approved the nickel tax in Tuesday’s election. [Henderson Gleaner]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… The well-preserved partial skull and skeleton of a gibbon-like creature that lived 11.6 million years ago in Spain is shedding new light on the evolutionary history of modern apes. [Reuters]

Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes narrowly won a second term Tuesday, blocking a challenge by Republican Steve Knipper, a former Erlanger city councilman. [H-L]

If you don’t think teachers are important and deserve mega raises, you ought to think again. [HuffPo]