Vultures = Metaphor For New Republicans

The idea of black vultures turning predatory might sound like the plot of a low-budget horror film, but to Kentucky farmers trying to protect calving cows, that horror has become all too real in recent years. Now it appears farmers are fighting back against the federally protected migratory birds in a big way. [H-L]

The anti-Muslim white supremacist charged with murdering two men in Portland, Oregon, when they intervened in his bigoted tirade at two teenagers is the kind of extremist that former Department of Homeland Security official Daryl Johnson worried about. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville’s endowment — managed by the beleaguered U of L Foundation — lost about 6 percent of its value last year. [C-J/AKN]

Germany’s largest bank has failed to respond to a request from Democrats on a U.S. House of Representatives panel for details about U.S. President Donald Trump’s possible ties to Russia, a Democratic staffer said on Sunday. [Reuters]

You can thank bigots like Matt Bevin and other twits in the Republican Party of Kentucky (we’re looking at you, self-hating Julie Raque Adams) for Kentucky’s disastrous economy. While state officials are touting 2017 as a record-breaking year for business investments, a new study ranked Kentucky the third worst state for jobs. [Richmond Register]

Lee Francis Cissna, President Trump’s nominee to head the federal agency that handles applications for visas, refugee status and citizenship, has put little on the public record in his 20 years as a lawyer, government employee, diplomat and Capitol Hill aide. [ProPublica]

A plan to build a pavilion, or another multiuse structure, in downtown Ashland that would shelter local farmers and artisans and be used for special events is “in the works,” according to Mayor Steve Gilmore. [Ashland Independent]

As the country — and Washington in particular — borders on near-obsession over whether affiliates of Donald Trump’s campaign colluded with the Kremlin to swing the 2016 presidential election, U.S. intelligence officials say Moscow’s espionage ground game is growing stronger and more brazen than ever. [Politico]

Only one person spoke during a public hearing Thursday morning regarding the financing of the new Metcalfe County Government Center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Six months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the June 7, 1942, edition of the Chicago Sunday Tribune trumpeted news of a stunning American victory over a Japanese armada at the Battle of Midway. [WaPo]

Last week, church leaders from West Louisville and beyond packed into a public school auditorium to hear Gov. Matt Bevin’s ideas for how to stop a surge of violent crime in the neighborhood. [WFPL]

What will end racism in the United States? Certainly not modern/New Republicans. [BBC]

Frustrated by complaints of shoddy customer service and the recent layoffs of 56 employees, Lexington city officials want Spectrum executives to come to city hall to discuss the city’s mounting concerns about the cable company. [H-L]

Over 63 years after Brown v. Board of Education made state-sanctioned school segregation illegal and set off a wave of controversial efforts to diversify districts, many schools have settled back into old patterns. Although the law no longer endorses it, schools are still divided along fault lines of race and class. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]