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Republicans Must Favor Death For Working Poor

January 3rd, 2014 · 1 Comment

Tolls would be used to cover nearly all the costs for building a proposed Ohio River bridge touted as a way to relieve congestion on an aging span at Cincinnati, according to a plan released by Kentucky and Ohio officials. [H-L]

Americans enter 2014 with a profoundly negative view of their government, expressing little hope that elected officials can or will solve the nation’s biggest problems, a new poll finds. [HuffPo]

About two-thirds of Kentuckians favor a statewide law against lighting up in public places, according to a new poll that has found steadily rising support in a state with the nation’s highest smoking rate. [C-J/AKN]

Seven months ago, the world began to learn the vast scope of the National Security Agency’s reach into the lives of hundreds of millions of people in the United States and around the globe, as it collects information about their phone calls, their email messages, their friends and contacts, how they spend their days and where they spend their nights. The public learned in great detail how the agency has exceeded its mandate and abused its authority, prompting outrage at kitchen tables and at the desks of Congress, which may finally begin to limit these practices. [NY Times]

This story from Morehead/Clearfield will send you into a rage. Two children were hospitalized and seven others placed in protective custody when Kentucky State Police and state social workers responded late Monday to a residence on Igo Road near Clearfield. [The Morehead News]

A couple extreme closet cases are leading the charge. On a recent snowy day in the Washington suburb of Tysons Corner in Northern Virginia, some of the religious right’s wealthiest backers and top operatives gathered at the Ritz-Carlton to plot their entry into the conservative civil war. [Politico]

This comes as a surprise to exactly no one. According to data compiled by Bloomberg, Kentucky is currently among the least innovative states in the nation. [Business First]

Get your popcorn ready, meemaws! Bill Nye the Science Guy is gonna debate the Creation Museum lunatic on February 4. [Click the Clicky]

Kentucky will benefit more than most states under the federal health-care law, receiving $3 to cover more people under Medicaid for every additional $1 of taxes residents pay. [H-L]

Breaking news: The Wall Street Journal editorial page is full of it. OK, that’s not really news. But an unusually flagrant example of the WSJ editorial page’s hogwash artistry caught the world’s eye on Thursday, when New York Times columnist Paul Krugman pointed out several big problems with a column published this week. [HuffPo]

Here’s a surprise: John David Dyche complaining about his worst fear: Medicaid and the poors. Dyche, like all dittoheads, conveniently neglects to mention that a huge swatch of those now on the Medicaid rolls are young, working people. The kind of folks who rarely get sick and rarely use medical benefits. He also claims there are “more productive purposes” to spend money on than Medicaid. Because, well, screw the working poor. This may be one of the dumbest things the man has ever written. That’s saying a lot. [The Lane Stenograph]

The one-story beige building on Southwest Hill Road in McMinnville, Ore. – an old mill town between Portland and Salem – has seen plenty of trouble over the years of its operation as an assisted living facility. [ProPublica]

Tags: Campaign Finance · Eastern Kentucky · FEAR! · Health Care · Humor · Polling · Taxes · Wiretapping

1 response so far ↓

  • 1 Ed Marksberry // Jan 3, 2014 at 8:41 am

    John David Dyche has a valid point if you ignore the fact that Ky is a poor state in which it’s citizens have little opportunity for economic advancement because the political leaders of both party’s “traditional conservative” dogma mentality. John seeks progress without the soil, seed and nutrition required Ito grow a sustainable economy. If John and the state seeks progress, it must invest not only in educating and informing its citizens, but also by participating in a changing world that works toward the commonwealth of all, not just the few.