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What Happened In That Lexington Motel Room?

March 14th, 2013 · 5 Comments

Kentucky lawmakers continue to bicker over a handful of high-profile bills, but their list of accomplishments during the first 28 days of this year’s 30-day legislative session includes approval of more than 100 bills. [H-L]

Bill Clinton won the presidential election for Barack Obama. But it wasn’t his masterful Democratic National Convention speech or the advice he offered the president’s reelection campaign. [HuffPo]

Some of those watching the last two days of the General Assembly on Kentucky Educational Television may wonder what lawmakers are doing during all those recesses. [Ronnie Ellis]

That is too bad that Florida’s Lieutenant Governor, Jennifer Carroll, had to resign for being sooooo shady. [Wonkette]

Today at 1:00 P.M. Eastern, Auditor Adam Edelen with Education Commissioner Terry Holliday to make an announcement in Frankfort. [Press Release]

Republicans have a steep hill to climb if they want to take control of the Senate next year. The GOP would need to pick up six seats in 2014. [NPR]

Police say it all started Wednesday morning when someone called 911 for help with someone who was unresponsive. They say that person died, two others are at UK Hospital being treated for malnourishment and police have opened a possible abuse/neglect investigation. [WKYT]

By highlighting the need to increase the federal minimum wage in his State of the Union address, President Obama breathed new life into a critically important issue. [EPI]

A Breathitt County woman has pleaded guilty to stealing $211,000 from an agriculture program where she worked. [H-L]

On the same day as Rand Paul’s celebrated filibuster against drone strikes last week, the Senate engaged in a less noticed but more typical form of delay and obstruction. [New Yorker]

A federal judge has ordered the state of Kentucky to pay about $219,000 in legal fees and expenses for the plaintiff’s attorneys in the challenge to a state law prohibiting sales of liquor and wine in groceries. [C-J/AKN]

The number of Americans who claim to have no religious affiliation is the highest it has ever been since data on the subject started being collected in the 1930s, new research has found. [HuffPo]

Tags: Adam Edelen · Barack Obama · Congress · Corruption · Eastern Kentucky · Economy · Education · Kentucky Business · Polling · Senate

5 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Novena // Mar 14, 2013 at 8:38 am

    “A Huge Sign of Progress”

    That more and more people are shunning religion give me pause for hope in the future. In most civilizations, there is a cultural lag. Science and common sense seems to be creeping up on superstition, magic, fantasy, and ignorance.

  • 2 FreeManNKy // Mar 14, 2013 at 9:03 am

    Novena, I get you believe that religion is bad. I get you are hopeful for the future. This report wasn’t they were abandoning religion for science. They are abandoning religion for reality TV. It’s Idiocracy (the movie) coming to pass. I am Methodist but, embrace Science as well.

    If people were saying they didn’t believe because of science…. that would be different.

    Also, the minimum wage is a BS topic. (Putting on my Paultard hat) We need to look at how they devalue our currency making our money worthless.

  • 3 Novena // Mar 14, 2013 at 10:25 am

    “Response to FreeMan”

    Good points–since you read the piece much more closely than I did. I,too, think Reality TV is for the birds (to be honest, I was just commenting on Jake’s introductory blurb). I do believe the minimum wage should be raised to afford all people here a chance at a decent life. (Sometimes I also believe that religion can leave people in chains, rather than igniting them to change their socio-economic conditions). Concentrating on “a next world”–which might not exist–could well be playing into that inertia. Glad that you embrace Science! Wish more folks did (G. W> Bush & Co. certainly did not).

  • 4 FreeManNKy // Mar 14, 2013 at 5:18 pm

    Novena,

    I don’t see any solid evidence of raising the minimum wage as increasing the quality of life. What it tends to do is eliminate people in the work force (i.e. younger workers like me in the 1990s who worked minimum wage). I am not going to pull the “I’m a business owner” but, I do own a business and I never hire at min. wage. That said, if the profits are slim now on a business that uses min. wage and you raise it…. most likely will cause layoffs. I just see more harm than good with a minimum wage at all.

  • 5 Novena // Mar 14, 2013 at 7:23 pm

    “Response to FreeMan’s Reasoned Analysis”

    As usual, FreeMan, you supply us some reasonable claims. On the other side, I would point out that the working poor are long overdue for a minimum wage increase. Doing so would likely provide more economic spending on their part and thus help reduce our awful poverty rate and stimulate the overall economy. Right now the US ranks 11th among 24 industrial, developed nations in terms of minimum wage laws. The latter are nothing to be proud of in the richest country on Earth.