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More On Putting EpiPens In Kentucky Schools

February 20th, 2013 · 2 Comments

Putting EpiPens in Kentucky schools just makes sense. It’s not something people in their right mind would oppose.

Jefferson County Public Schools says they’re neutral on requiring Epi-Pens in Kentucky schools:

JCPS is taking a neutral stance concerning House bill 172. If it passes, JCPS schools and its staff will adjust accordingly.”

What the hell does neutral even mean? How can the wealthiest school district in the state be “neutral” when it comes to something cheap that could keep some of the most vulnerable kids in rural Kentucky alive in an emergency?

The “neutral” bit is bogus because JCTA officials have been all up our rears calling us bought and paid for because we dare have an opinion about this important issue. How dare Jake share his own experience. SHAME!

Another union is also going crazy in Frankfort as they burn phones up on the issue. Because that union also opposes saving kids who could otherwise die in an instant. The argument? It costs too much in the first year.

But, uh, here’s the deal: THEY’RE FREE FOR SCHOOLS THE FIRST YEAR.


CLICK TO VISIT

Specifically:

The EpiPen4Schools program was created to allow qualified schools to obtain EpiPen Auto-Injectors at no-cost.

So, uh, about that talking point.

It’s a shame that two educational unions would fight something so important.

Tags: Corruption · Education · Health Care · Youth

2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Monica // Feb 20, 2013 at 2:00 pm

    “Qualified schools.” Hmmm. Do you think that means schools that really don’t have the money for the EpiPens and are deemed ‘qualified’ based on a percentage of students eligible for free or reduced meal?

    Well, if it’s THAT, then most of Kentucky schools will qualify to get the pens.

    I’m embarrassed that anyone is fighting this bill; much less educators.

    If I were a teacher, I would want an EpiPen available. If you know about the EpiPen and what it does (and Jake, YOU do; that was for the other readers), you also know that it is never the wrong thing to use in a iffy situation.

  • 2 jake // Feb 21, 2013 at 11:48 am

    The bill passed unanimously out of the House Ed. committee. Looks like a common sense discussion worked for the most part.